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Paul78

Bergeron Automatic Oilers, yes or no?

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Hi all, I'm thinking about investing in the set of automatic oilers available from cousins. They cost about 200 quid with the VAT, that's obviously a lot of money so just wondered if any of you use them and are they worth the money? 

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If you are servicing movements on a regular basis, then I would highly recommend them, I have automatic Bergeons, and also use manual oilers too, I tend to use the auto oilers on all Swiss movements, and the manual on all other movements.

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I got the 1A oiler to use on Seiko diafix jewels. They are a pain to oil manually. Right away I broke the tip of the oiler. Got a new tip, dropped the oiler while replacing the tip, thought for sure I'd broken it again, but no, just bent a bit. Works OK.

Got it adjusted, those diabolical diafixes are now a piece of cake :woohoo-jumping-smiley-emoticon:

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Hi Paul,

I believe automatic oilers are nice to have and for some, when volume is involved, a must. Have in mind that they will not work satisfactory with thick oil or at all with grease for that matter. In a way this is fine since most of the time you will be using 9010 or similar...I suppose.

There is a small learning curve with them: from regulating to the actual way to use them. Nothing major but as everything watchmaking, it requires practice.

Another issue is the cost. Maybe cost and value is not really equivalent here...I find they are too expensive, both to purchase and to repair is anything breaks...think tips...

As for many old school watchmakers, they have always used manual oilers and have kept up pretty well. I remember our OldHippy saying he preferred manual oiling?

All I'm saying here is that automatic oils although useful, sometimes convenient (depending) and fast, may not be exactly what you really NEED but simply one more "pleasure" to play with that might or might not see much use in the end. It just depends of what you do, the volume you have and how practical it will actually be, given the work you do most.

IMHO, if you have the extra bucks, by no means, go ahead and "knock yourself out" as we say, but if you need to "justify" the extra expense -- either to yourself or to the tax/boss/other parties -- then maybe living without them would also be an option.

mmm, maybe for a tax write off would also be a good choice...

I hope this helps decide,

Cheers,

Bob

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Thanks for your input everyone, as I'm just learning the trade at the moment - I think it's probably best I stick to the manual oilers. Cost isn't an issue, I don't mind spending the money if it can be justified, but it seems you are all in agreement that they are more of a luxury toy rather than a necessity! Unless of course the workload is high. We probably do around 20 - 30 mechanical watches per month at present but the bulk of these go to our trusted repairer that we've used for many years, even before I owned the shop! He's passed retirement age though so I'm preparing myself for the day he decidedes he can no longer do it! 

So for now I think I'll stick to the manuals but get myself a better set of bergeons and new pots to go with them!

thanks all. 

Edited by Paul78

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Well, it's been a while since there was any activity in this thread, but I'd just like to add that I saw Mark Lovick use the Auto Oiler 1A - Bergeon 7718-1A (I believe) and was so very impressed that I just had to order one. Waiting for it now...

I find oiling cap jewels a bit of a pain and I often end up redoing it several times before getting that nicely drop-shaped dot of oil covering some 50 to 70 % of the cap jewel surface. There were times when I had to do it 10 times to get it right, taking "forever". My skills have improved but I still find it a pain to get it just right. When Mark does it in the video it looks like "music" :angel:

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If anyone here has the 'new' version 1A could I make a request please?

I would like a measurement of the cap diameter where it slots into the body of the oiler and the diameter of the oiler shaft where it clamps into the trigger assembly and the overall length of the oiler shaft please.

The reason being. I bought a second hand one minus the oiler, unfortunately it turned out the cap is cracked also hence both need replacing. They're now 'unavailable' in the UK and when I find them they're stupidly expensive. To the point I might as well buy a whole new 1A oiler.

My idea is to replace with a new version cap and needle if they'll slot in, unfortunately cousins support email service was of no use and either didn't understand what I was asking or uninterested in assisting.

Thanks.

 

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automatic oilers definitely help when it comes to oiling but you can do the same job with regular oilers. its like driving a mercedes instead of a chevy they will both get you where your going but one will be a smoother ride because there is more bells and whistles. Personally I agree with clockboy with only the 1A really being worth it. I like it because it makes servicing quicker, guarantees correct oil amount, and fits perfectly in jewel holes. Not to mention keeping the oil safe from contamination. 

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9 hours ago, Watchtime said:

thanks for sharing, very interesting to watch,:Bravo:

This was my very first attempt at recording (iPhone 6s) and editing (VideoPad) a video, so your praise means a lot to me! Thank you! :thumbsu:

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