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    • By PaulnKC
      All,
      I am very nearsighted (between -6 and -7 in both eyes). With astigmatism. Now, in my late 50's I also have significant nearsightedness.
      I thought a flip up visor - which I could wear with my glasses would be best. I purchased an OptiVisor with a flip-down loupe. But not happy at all with the visual quality.
      I know you get what you pay for in optics. What is the best type of device for someone with old-bad eyes.
      I have never used a regular loupe - but thinking that may be the way to go. Any of you guys (or gals) have a reccomendation?
      -Paul
    • By rduckwor
      If this is inappropriate, please delete the post.
       
      I have an acquaintance who is closing his shop due to health after 43 years.  He has a large quantity of parts, stems, crowns, crystals and all the paraphernalia one would accumulate after a long period in the business.  He needs to liquidate his shop.  This isn't a "Hey do you have a __ for a __." kind of post.  We're talking serious stuff here.  Mass quantities.   If you need parts, equipment, etc. for your practice, please let me know.  I will pass along his email contact  to you.  Obviously, this is useful primarily only to those in the U.S. due to shipping costs.  But he has a huge amount of useful goods and is 100 miles South of Atlanta.  PM me if you need something.
       
      Thanks,

      RMD
    • By BrianG1
      Hi, I have a few bits and pieces, and clocks. And I am very interested in horology tips, conunundrms etc.
    • By marcoskaiser
      Would it be interesting for this forum to set up a list where we could exchange things like parts and tools?  I happen to have duplicate tools from my lot purchases, and feel that those could be better used. No money involved. Would that be feasible?
    • By Lenj
      Hi,
      Has anyone got one of these lathes?? if so are they any good for repairing pivots etc..I know they would not be any use for heavy work, but thought I would ask first..
      Have a good weekend all..
      Thanks Len


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    • Hello everybody. I lived in Texas 51 years before moving “up north” to Oklahoma last year. One of my passions is fixing things - working on the house, appliances, cars, trucks, motorcycles, lawnmowers, and anything else that needs fixing and I’ve been good at it except when it comes to watches - what a humbling experience. Googling “broken set lever screw 6497” led me down a trail that led to this forum.   For watches: I like just about everything regardless of cost. I have a 1969 Datejust that my grandfather bought new (my watch addiction started there when I was little), and a 1966 Datejust I recently picked up, an Omega AT, a few Seikos, a Vostok, a couple Citizens, an old Bulova, a few Timexes, and a wristwatch-from-pocketwatch conversion with a genuine 6498 movement. Like many of y’all I’m sure, I’ve bought and sold a ton of watches since 1985 and haven’t slowed down.   The embarrassing screw-breaking watch is a Panerai look-alike with an ST36 Chinese copy of a 6497. It’s cheap but I figured it was good to learn on. Water was getting in, and the set lever screw was stuck so I broke it trying to get the stem out. Broke the two stuck movement mounting tab screws also, probably due to the water. Got a new ST36 and broke the same dang set lever screw trying to replace the stem. Can’t blame the water this time. Had no idea a tiny screwdriver could deliver enough torque to break screws. The price of education... I need to enroll in a course and stop red-necking this stuff.   I have plenty ST36 parts if y’all need any -except screws....   Great to be here,   Bobo         Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro  
    • Hi William, Welcome to the forum. Have been to Elvis and Dolly parton show at Grand ole opry.  Carried out research work in the Atomic City.    Glad to have you here with us. Best wishes. Joe
    • To find out if the slot is in the right place, get a piece of wood wide enough to take the movement, use a 3/8th inch bolt and cut a slot in the end to take the suspention spring, drill a hole near the top of the wood and attach the bolt with a nut. hook the pendulum onto the suspention spring, attach the movement to the board where the crutch is at about the middle of the slot on the pendulum, if the movement is working? the clock should work, attach the hands and see if it is keeping time, which I doubt as I think the slot is way to low, anyway now you have this set up you can just move the movement UP or down till you find the right place for the slot. You do not need to cut the slot while trying to find the right place,  just drill a hole a 1/16th of an inch wider than the crutch, you may end up with a few holes however when about in the right place then cut the slot an 1/2 inch above and below the hole, you can fill to holes or just buy a new pendulum stick.
    • I have the Hormec hollow grind sharpener, and a roller sharpener for wedge shape, and a large diamond file. I hate the Hormec and hollow ground blades (like them for clocks and other stuff though, PB Swiss make my old Snap-On stuff look like toys). I sharpen regularly with the diamond file. Wedge shape, not too shallow. I recall Hamilton recommending 15 degrees, I do a little more. Been meaning to sell the Hormec but after loaning it out try-before-buy to several folks they lose interest after actually trying hollow ground. I know one watchmaker who uses mostly hollow ground, but has 3 or 4 sets and is always messing with them. It doesn't really matter as long as the screws (and nearby parts) survive unscathed. When doing final assembly of a new watch with flat polished screws, where each screw gets hand polished on tin, I use a nickel (german silver) blade, which needs dressing every 3 or 4 screws.
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