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    • By PaulnKC
      All,
      I am very nearsighted (between -6 and -7 in both eyes). With astigmatism. Now, in my late 50's I also have significant nearsightedness.
      I thought a flip up visor - which I could wear with my glasses would be best. I purchased an OptiVisor with a flip-down loupe. But not happy at all with the visual quality.
      I know you get what you pay for in optics. What is the best type of device for someone with old-bad eyes.
      I have never used a regular loupe - but thinking that may be the way to go. Any of you guys (or gals) have a reccomendation?
      -Paul
    • By rduckwor
      If this is inappropriate, please delete the post.
       
      I have an acquaintance who is closing his shop due to health after 43 years.  He has a large quantity of parts, stems, crowns, crystals and all the paraphernalia one would accumulate after a long period in the business.  He needs to liquidate his shop.  This isn't a "Hey do you have a __ for a __." kind of post.  We're talking serious stuff here.  Mass quantities.   If you need parts, equipment, etc. for your practice, please let me know.  I will pass along his email contact  to you.  Obviously, this is useful primarily only to those in the U.S. due to shipping costs.  But he has a huge amount of useful goods and is 100 miles South of Atlanta.  PM me if you need something.
       
      Thanks,

      RMD
    • By BrianG1
      Hi, I have a few bits and pieces, and clocks. And I am very interested in horology tips, conunundrms etc.
    • By marcoskaiser
      Would it be interesting for this forum to set up a list where we could exchange things like parts and tools?  I happen to have duplicate tools from my lot purchases, and feel that those could be better used. No money involved. Would that be feasible?
    • By Lenj
      Hi,
      Has anyone got one of these lathes?? if so are they any good for repairing pivots etc..I know they would not be any use for heavy work, but thought I would ask first..
      Have a good weekend all..
      Thanks Len


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    • Hi Dan, Welcome to the forum.
    • A soak in diesel fuel, naphta for day or two,  ends the old story of heads popping off the screws. I remove balance cock pallets and soak the rest, give one dip in a fluid I can stand the odor of. Any cheap multipurpose oil would do. I use several solutions, detergent seperately and brush extesively.  
    • Hello forum folks, I've been tinkering with watches for maybe 5 years now. I'm very much a beginner but I have been practicing on cheap watches and movements that it is ok to break. I've managed to make my own watch dial from a brass sheet, including brushing, rhodium plating, printing, and creating applied markers and numerals. I've also made a "smart" watch using epoxy-based putty for the case and my electronics knowledge. I have some basic skills in metal finishing including polishing and plating. So I've mostly worked on the non-movement aspects of watchmaking and am interested into learning about servicing movements. I live in the Milwaukee area and was thrilled to see MATC (local trade school) on lists of schools that teach watchmaking -- just to have that dashed when I contacted them and the class has been discontinued for lack of interest  So for now, I have online and book resources to learn. I have a mostly cheap watch collection other than a Longines that I treasure. I have a few different old timex mechanicals I got off of ebay, including 2 from JerseyMo which I saw is on this forum. I have have way more hobbies than time so I'll probably be around off and on. Dan
    • First thing would be to remove the pinions. They are sometimes quite well rivetted, so this may involve turning away some of the rivet or being willing to sacrifice the wheel (it could easily be distorted beyond use in punching the pinion out). Then you need to compare the hole in the wheel you want to use to the diameter on the pinion that will be pressed and rivetted in. If too big it gets tricky, you'll need to sleeve/bush the hole very securely. I would open the hole further, then chamfer both sides, make the bush with an undersized hole, then fit it in. Swage the bush with a convex punch in the hole from both sides, then a flat punch that is larger than the bush. The idea is to deform metal into the two chamfers on the wheel. Finally flatten and clean up. Now open the hole to receive the pinion. If the hole is too small it's easy, just open it up and press/rivett the pinion in.
    • Thanks @jdm its easier if you know the correct name / term, that helps a lot.
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