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Stian

Foam in cleaning machine jar 1

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Hi guys,

Another question from a newbie: I have a rotating cleaning machine with three jars. In the first jar I have Sambol Platina 1:20, in the second jar Elma reinigungskonzentrat 1:9 for rinsing and in the third jar sterilized water. Thereafter the basket goes in the heater chamber.

My issue for now is that the first jar completely foams up. The jar is 3/5 full with the solvent but becomes completely foamed up. Is this a problem with the solvent or is it not actually a problem? I got this solvent from watch-tool.de

Stian

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