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Stian

Do I clean the mainspring in the rotation cleaner basket?

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Hi gurus,

I have picked apart my first actual watch (although a cheap one I bought for this purpose), and am preparing to clean and oil it. For the mainspring, I am however not comfortable with how I'm supposed to clean it and could use some help!

I have an L&R style cleaner that rotates through three jars, and below is the picture of the bottom basket and the mainspring. My question is: do I simply coil the mainspring into the basket or do I need to clean it "old style" with a piece of paper and oil? I believe Mark said in a video that he puts the spring in the bottom basket of his machine?

--
Thanks,
Stian

Mainspring cleaning.jpg

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Main springs go into the bottom basket of my Elma, main plate, barrel arbour, and bridges into the middle with the weight distributed as evenly as possible to keep the basket as balanced as I can when it's spinning, all the small bits in the top, with the smallest in mesh capsules for safety, again positioned to maintain balance. When the baskets go in the cage I try and position the heaviest point in the top basket 180° round from the heavy point in the middle basket, it just helps reduce vibration.

If the main spring is particularly dirty or has a heavy coating of engine oil or WD40 then it gets a wipe first to reduce cleaning fluid contamination.

Don't forget to grease the spring before it goes back into the barrel.

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