Jump to content
Claytonc

Excited - re-assembled my first watch and it is running.

Recommended Posts

Ah there's nothing like your first. Good job my man keep it up it looks to be running well. Do you own a timegrapher yet it will help a lot with regulating and help with fault finding. But with the amount of oil you bought I should let your funds replenish unless of course money is no object in which case get one ordered:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone. Yeah. Those oil disasters always take time to recover from. :) Going to have to wait a bit on a timegrapher. Note to self: Google timegrapher. :)

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great job! Remember to buy the timegrapher, the staking tool set, the jeweling set and the escapement tester. Do not waste your money on cheap, disreputable tools, buy witschi, Bergeon, Seitz, and Bergeon respectively....It is only a few dollars...like US$10K....more?

PS. I have to make a living somehow, remember to tell them I sent you!!! :D

Cheers,

Bob

PS2. No, seriously, great job and just have fun!!

I remember my first one: I was so happy then, I threw away my only time keeping devise I had before: a solar alarm clock. You know, the one with the blade sticking up...in the garden... always making this sound in the morning: cock-a-doodle-doo, oh well! :D

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes not having a timegrapher is a blessing. It's fine if you trying to find/diagnose the problem but you will waste a lot of time trying to nail down that last bit of accuracy..getting it perfect. Most watches run ok enough. Give or take a minute or two a day.

A watch would have been a good runner 40 years ago but there will be wear and you have to accept that unless you are prepared to change all the wheels other stuff. Positional accuracy is especially tough to get right.

Sometimes ignorance is bliss.

Anil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congratulations from me as well, I stripped and reassembled my bro in laws watch as my first, it was not so much excitement as sheer relief that it worked, it was just gummed up really and needed a service. I was lucky it kept good time as well.  

I have since acquired the timegrapher and spent quite a bit on tools as well but sometimes I just like to look at them and clean them a bit - oh dear that sounds  weird, but tools are great.

Cheers,

Vic

Edited by Vich
Forgot why I did it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Hello dear watchmakers. I am trying to train myself to polish a watch. I got myself a Dramel 3000 and put a little pelt wheel. I applied green polishing paste and tried polishing a caseback in speed of 5 (out of 10 ) With Dramel, I tried polishing up and down then from side to side. I did get some scratches and even some printings out but the caseback is left with foggy traces. What have I done wrong and how should I fix it? I have attached the photos of polished caseback. (I forgot to take photo before doing the job) Great thanks.   
    • I think the slot cut in the base of that particular holder will prevent you from fouling the subseconds pivot in that particular position.    The continuous change of rate suggests to me that you may have uneven delivery of torque. That assumes that it continues to change when the watch is left in that position to settle down. The same can happen with A hairspring which isn’t vibrating consistently due to magnetism/sticking/fouling, but looking at your trace, my first guess would be friction in the train.    So, if this were my watch, I’d firstly do the billy-basics and check that the train runs freely with the pallets removed. What this test does not show you is of the train continues to run freely when under load. That seems to escape a lot of people. Under load, the side-thrust changes the orientation of the wheels and can lead to unwanted friction. Most common place for this to occur is between the barrel and centre wheel. So check the side-shake of the barrel and centre wheel - it’s sometimes easier to do this with the pallets installed as it allows you to gently push the barrel (or centre wheel) back and forth which usually reveals side-shake quite obviously.    Things I would try to avoid assuming, although ultimately you may need to try many things: - That the beat error is the cause.  - That the mainspring is set. 
    • They make a dust cover for that mike specifically but I think is very overpriced for something easily made. https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/dust-cover-for-use-with-witschi-microphone?code=T52813
    • As the other comments its a pop off case back and most likley a pin lever movement but non the less its worth doing a job on, look forward to seeing the movement.
    • Same issue I have the 1900 which has that naughty spring as well. As a precaution I have the holder sitting on a large duster to soften the blow if it drops out.
×
×
  • Create New...