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Claytonc

Excited - re-assembled my first watch and it is running.

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Ah there's nothing like your first. Good job my man keep it up it looks to be running well. Do you own a timegrapher yet it will help a lot with regulating and help with fault finding. But with the amount of oil you bought I should let your funds replenish unless of course money is no object in which case get one ordered:D

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Thanks everyone. Yeah. Those oil disasters always take time to recover from. :) Going to have to wait a bit on a timegrapher. Note to self: Google timegrapher. :)

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Great job! Remember to buy the timegrapher, the staking tool set, the jeweling set and the escapement tester. Do not waste your money on cheap, disreputable tools, buy witschi, Bergeon, Seitz, and Bergeon respectively....It is only a few dollars...like US$10K....more?

PS. I have to make a living somehow, remember to tell them I sent you!!! :D

Cheers,

Bob

PS2. No, seriously, great job and just have fun!!

I remember my first one: I was so happy then, I threw away my only time keeping devise I had before: a solar alarm clock. You know, the one with the blade sticking up...in the garden... always making this sound in the morning: cock-a-doodle-doo, oh well! :D

 

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Sometimes not having a timegrapher is a blessing. It's fine if you trying to find/diagnose the problem but you will waste a lot of time trying to nail down that last bit of accuracy..getting it perfect. Most watches run ok enough. Give or take a minute or two a day.

A watch would have been a good runner 40 years ago but there will be wear and you have to accept that unless you are prepared to change all the wheels other stuff. Positional accuracy is especially tough to get right.

Sometimes ignorance is bliss.

Anil

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Congratulations from me as well, I stripped and reassembled my bro in laws watch as my first, it was not so much excitement as sheer relief that it worked, it was just gummed up really and needed a service. I was lucky it kept good time as well.  

I have since acquired the timegrapher and spent quite a bit on tools as well but sometimes I just like to look at them and clean them a bit - oh dear that sounds  weird, but tools are great.

Cheers,

Vic

Edited by Vich
Forgot why I did it

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