sstakoff

ETA 2893-1 Service Walkthrough - Part 1 - Disassembly (repost)

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Service Walk Through – ETA 2893-1 / Hamilton Khaki: Part 1 - Disassembly

This is part 1 of my service of a Hamilton Khaki – dual time zone automatic based on the ETA 2893-1 movement. I purchased the watch on eBay and it runs for a short time then stops. Looks like it could use a good cleaning.

Note that the part numbers in the images and text are consistent with those found in the ETA technical document for this movement. Disassembly of this movement is quite straightforward. The only "special" tool you need would be an oscillating weight bolt tool - and you only need this if you intend to remove the ball bearing assembly from the oscillating weight, which really isn't required. In this tear down I do use the tool - only because I recently acquired it and wanted to see how it worked :)

 

Off we go....


 

1.jpg

The dial shows evidence of some sloppy workmanship in the watch's past – several scratches from prior hand removal.

 

 

2-1.jpg

Here you see the back of the 2893-1 with its automatic rotor - nicely signed Hamilton. The arrows indicate the location of the dial screws which secure the dial to the movement. These screws have a flat. Turn them just enough so the flat is facing the dial foot and the dial pops right off. Secure the screws so they don’t pop off during cleaning.

3.jpg

Preparing to remove the hands – with a safety sheet in place.

 

 

 

4-1.jpg

After removing the dial, remove the Dial Support Ring (47). This ring keeps the dial the proper distance from the second timezone disc. Without it, the disc will rub against the dial.

 

 

 

5-1.jpg

Remove the second timezone disc, or what ETA calls the Universal Hour Indicator (46) from the center. This is a bit tricky as there’s no obvious place to grip it. I used two very small screwdrivers on each side to lift the indicator straight up. Be careful not to scratch it!

 

 

6-1.jpg

With the disc removed, we can now remove the Dial Washer / Friction Spring (45), Corrector Setting Wheel (44) and Hour Indicator Driving Wheel (43).

 

7.jpg

 

9.jpg

 

8.jpg 

 

 

10-1.jpg

The Hour Wheel (42) can now be lifted off, followed by the Additional Indicator Maintaining Plate (41).

11.jpg

 

 

12-1.jpg

Next components to remove are the Date Indicator Maintaining Plate (40) and the Minute Train Bridge (35).

 

13-1.jpg

 

 

14-1.jpg

We move on to remove the Intermediate Date Wheel (39). The Date Jumper (38) has also been exposed when we removed the maintaining plate, so we remove it. Finally, we remove the Date Indicator (37) and the Date Indicator Driving Wheel (36).

 

15.jpg

16.jpg

 

 

17-1.jpg

Now on to some of the motion and keyless work. We remove the Minute Wheel (34)Cannon Pinion with Driving Wheel (33)Double Corrector (32), Date Corrector Intermediate Setting Wheel (31) and Setting Wheel (30).

 

18.jpg

 

 

19.jpg

This side is almost complete. We leave the setting components in place. Removing them now would be problematic as we have yet to release tension from the mainspring.

 

20-1.jpg

21-1.jpg

Flip the movement over and remove the automatic work. After removing the 3 blue screws (seen in the previous 2 pics) we lift the entire unit up gently by the Oscillating Weight (28).

 

22.jpg

 

23-1.jpg

With the automatic work out of the way – I notice that the Stop Lever (Hack) is missing! Will try and source one.

 

 

 

24-1.jpg

Back to the automatic work. Removing these 3 small screws will allow the oscillating weight to come off the Automatic Framework (21).

 

25.jpg

 

 

25.1.jpg

This is a special tool designed to release the Oscillating Weight Bolt

 

26-1.jpg

I remove the Oscillating Weight Bolt (28-3) and free the Ball Bearing (28-2) from the Oscillating Weight (28-1). There was no compelling reason to disassemble this portion of the movement, but the tool worked as expected!

 

 

 

27-1.jpg

With the Oscillating Weight out of the way, remove the Auxiliary Reverser (27).

 

28.jpg

 

 

29-1.jpg

Flip the unit over once again and remove the screw and Automatic Device Lower Bridge (26).

 

 

 

30-1.jpg

Remove the Reverser (25), Reverser Wheel (24), Reduction Wheel (23) and Intermediate Reduction Wheel (22).

 

31.jpg

 

32.jpg

A view of the underside of these components – handy when trying to remember which way to reassemble.

 

 

 

33-1.jpg

Remove the single screw and gently lift off the Balance Assembly (20) with the Balance Complete (19).

 

34.jpg

 

 

35-1.jpg

Carefully let the power down by releasing the Click (12-6) and slowly letting the crown wind down.

 

 

 

36-1.jpg

 Remove the Pallet Bridge (18) and Pallets (17).

 

 

 

37-1.jpg

Remove the Train Wheel Bridge (16). It is secured with a hefty screw!

 

38.jpg

 

 

39-1.jpg

Remove the Fourth Wheel (15), Third Wheel (14) and Escape Wheel (13).

 

40.jpg

 

 

41-1.jpg

Remove the 3 screws and the Barrel Bridge (12)

 

42.jpg

 

43-1.jpg

 

Flip the bridge over and lift off the Ratchet Wheel Driving Wheel (12-2)

 

 

44-1.jpg

Remove the screw and the Click Plate (12-7), followed by the Click (12-6), Intermediate Ratchet Wheel (12-5), Intermediate Crown Wheel (12-4) and Crown Wheel (12-3). Note that the Intermediate Crown Wheel is under the Click Plate. When I removed the plate, the wheel was stuck to it due to some old oil.

 

45.jpg

 

46.jpg

Here you can see the Intermediate Crown Wheel as it was stuck.

 

 

 

47-1.jpg

This shows the proper placement of the wheels.

 

 

 

48-1.jpg

Remove the Ratchet Wheel (11), the Mainspring Barrel (10) and Intermediate Wheel (9). Note the scrap of tissue that found its way onto the movement. I was so focused on taking pics that I didn’t notice.

 

49.jpg

 

 

50.jpg

Pop the lid off the Barrel

 

51.jpg

 Remove the mainspring arbor

 

52.jpg

And finally, remove the mainspring, leaving the empty barrel

 

 

 

53.jpg

The movement side is now completely bare. Let’s flip it over and finish off the keyless work.

 

54-1.jpg

Unscrew and remove the Setting Lever Jumper (8), Yoke (7) and the Setting Lever (6)

 

55.jpg

56.jpg

 

 

57-1.jpg

Remove the Date Corrector Operating Lever (5), Winding Stem (4), Winding Pinion (3) and the Sliding Pinion (2)

 

58.jpg

 

59.jpg

All stripped down

 

60.jpg

Ready for the Ultrasonic!!!

 

 

 

 

Hope you enjoyed this. In case you are interested, photo equipment used was:

 

Camera: Nikon D5300 DSLR

Lens: Nikon   AF-S VR Micro-NIKKOR 105mm f/2.8G IF-ED,

Shutter Release: Nikon ML-L3 Remote Shutter Release (wireless)

Lighting: Polaroid Macro LED Ring Flash

Tripod: Vanguard Alta Pro 263AB 100

 

 

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7 minutes ago, oldhippy said:

Very good. Now to put it back.:D

I have to put it back together???? Oh no!!!

I'm about half way done - just a bit short on time. But I'll get there....

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On 12.7.2016 at 2:02 PM, sstakoff said:

Service Walk Through – ETA 2893-1 / Hamilton Khaki: Part 1 - Disassembly

 

This is part 1 of my service of a Hamilton Khaki – dual time zone automatic based on the ETA 2893-1 movement. I purchased the watch on eBay and it runs for a short time then stops. Looks like it could use a good cleaning.

 

 

 

Note that the part numbers in the images and text are consistent with those found in the ETA technical document for this movement. Disassembly of this movement is quite straightforward. The only "special" tool you need would be an oscillating weight bolt tool - and you only need this if you intend to remove the ball bearing assembly from the oscillating weight, which really isn't required. In this tear down I do use the tool - only because I recently acquired it and wanted to see how it worked :)

 

 

 

Off we go....

 

 


 

1.jpg

 

The dial shows evidence of some sloppy workmanship in the watch's past – several scratches from prior hand removal.

 

 

 

 

 

2-1.jpg

Here you see the back of the 2893-1 with its automatic rotor - nicely signed Hamilton. The arrows indicate the location of the dial screws which secure the dial to the movement. These screws have a flat. Turn them just enough so the flat is facing the dial foot and the dial pops right off. Secure the screws so they don’t pop off during cleaning.

 

 

 

3.jpg

Preparing to remove the hands – with a safety sheet in place.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4-1.jpg

 

 

After removing the dial, remove the Dial Support Ring (47). This ring keeps the dial the proper distance from the second timezone disc. Without it, the disc will rub against the dial.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5-1.jpg

Remove the second timezone disc, or what ETA calls the Universal Hour Indicator (46) from the center. This is a bit tricky as there’s no obvious place to grip it. I used two very small screwdrivers on each side to lift the indicator straight up. Be careful not to scratch it!

 

 

 

 

6-1.jpg

With the disc removed, we can now remove the Dial Washer / Friction Spring (45), Corrector Setting Wheel (44) and Hour Indicator Driving Wheel (43).

 

 

 

7.jpg

 

9.jpg

 

 

8.jpg 

 

 

 

10-1.jpg

The Hour Wheel (42) can now be lifted off, followed by the Additional Indicator Maintaining Plate (41).

 

11.jpg

 

 

 

 

12-1.jpg

Next components to remove are the Date Indicator Maintaining Plate (40) and the Minute Train Bridge (35).

 

 

 

13-1.jpg

 

 

 

14-1.jpg

We move on to remove the Intermediate Date Wheel (39). The Date Jumper (38) has also been exposed when we removed the maintaining plate, so we remove it. Finally, we remove the Date Indicator (37) and the Date Indicator Driving Wheel (36).

 

 

 

15.jpg

16.jpg

 

 

 

17-1.jpg

Now on to some of the motion and keyless work. We remove the Minute Wheel (34)Cannon Pinion with Driving Wheel (33)Double Corrector (32), Date Corrector Intermediate Setting Wheel (31) and Setting Wheel (30).

 

 

 

18.jpg

 

 

 

19.jpg

This side is almost complete. We leave the setting components in place. Removing them now would be problematic as we have yet to release tension from the mainspring.

 

 

 

20-1.jpg

21-1.jpg

Flip the movement over and remove the automatic work. After removing the 3 blue screws (seen in the previous 2 pics) we lift the entire unit up gently by the Oscillating Weight (28).

 

 

 

22.jpg

 

 

23-1.jpg

With the automatic work out of the way – I notice that the Stop Lever (Hack) is missing! Will try and source one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

24-1.jpg

Back to the automatic work. Removing these 3 small screws will allow the oscillating weight to come off the Automatic Framework (21).

 

 

 

25.jpg

 

 

 

25.1.jpg

This is a special tool designed to release the Oscillating Weight Bolt

 

 

 

26-1.jpg

I remove the Oscillating Weight Bolt (28-3) and free the Ball Bearing (28-2) from the Oscillating Weight (28-1). There was no compelling reason to disassemble this portion of the movement, but the tool worked as expected!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27-1.jpg

With the Oscillating Weight out of the way, remove the Auxiliary Reverser (27).

 

 

 

28.jpg

 

 

 

29-1.jpg

Flip the unit over once again and remove the screw and Automatic Device Lower Bridge (26).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

30-1.jpg

Remove the Reverser (25), Reverser Wheel (24), Reduction Wheel (23) and Intermediate Reduction Wheel (22).

 

 

 

31.jpg

 

 

32.jpg

A view of the underside of these components – handy when trying to remember which way to reassemble.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

33-1.jpg

Remove the single screw and gently lift off the Balance Assembly (20) with the Balance Complete (19).

 

 

 

34.jpg

 

 

 

35-1.jpg

Carefully let the power down by releasing the Click (12-6) and slowly letting the crown wind down.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

36-1.jpg

 Remove the Pallet Bridge (18) and Pallets (17).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

37-1.jpg

Remove the Train Wheel Bridge (16). It is secured with a hefty screw!

 

 

 

38.jpg

 

 

 

39-1.jpg

Remove the Fourth Wheel (15), Third Wheel (14) and Escape Wheel (13).

 

 

 

40.jpg

 

 

 

41-1.jpg

Remove the 3 screws and the Barrel Bridge (12)

 

 

 

42.jpg

 

 

43-1.jpg

 

 

 

Flip the bridge over and lift off the Ratchet Wheel Driving Wheel (12-2)

 

 

 

 

 

44-1.jpg

Remove the screw and the Click Plate (12-7), followed by the Click (12-6), Intermediate Ratchet Wheel (12-5), Intermediate Crown Wheel (12-4) and Crown Wheel (12-3). Note that the Intermediate Crown Wheel is under the Click Plate. When I removed the plate, the wheel was stuck to it due to some old oil.

 

 

 

45.jpg

 

 

46.jpg

Here you can see the Intermediate Crown Wheel as it was stuck.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

47-1.jpg

This shows the proper placement of the wheels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

48-1.jpg

Remove the Ratchet Wheel (11), the Mainspring Barrel (10) and Intermediate Wheel (9). Note the scrap of tissue that found its way onto the movement. I was so focused on taking pics that I didn’t notice.

 

 

 

49.jpg

 

 

 

50.jpg

Pop the lid off the Barrel

 

51.jpg

 Remove the mainspring arbor

 

52.jpg

And finally, remove the mainspring, leaving the empty barrel

 

 

 

 

 

 

53.jpg

 

 

The movement side is now completely bare. Let’s flip it over and finish off the keyless work.

 

 

 

54-1.jpg

Unscrew and remove the Setting Lever Jumper (8), Yoke (7) and the Setting Lever (6)

 

 

 

55.jpg

56.jpg

 

 

 

57-1.jpg

Remove the Date Corrector Operating Lever (5), Winding Stem (4), Winding Pinion (3) and the Sliding Pinion (2)

 

 

 

58.jpg

 

 

59.jpg

All stripped down

 

 

 

 

 

60.jpg

Ready for the Ultrasonic!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hope you enjoyed this. In case you are interested, photo equipment used was:

 

 

 

Camera: Nikon D5300 DSLR

 

Lens: Nikon   AF-S VR Micro-NIKKOR 105mm f/2.8G IF-ED,

 

Shutter Release: Nikon ML-L3 Remote Shutter Release (wireless)

 

Lighting: Polaroid Macro LED Ring Flash

 

Tripod: Vanguard Alta Pro 263AB 100

 

 

 

 

Very niceley done, very clear photoes...

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This helped me identify a part that I needed (reverser) and the fact that you actually put the part number in the high resolution photo, Amazing. Thank you for this.

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