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Hi,

I've been interested in watches and clocks for decades. 

Recently in another forum, someone posted "Show me you watch". 

So I did. 

Every day I changed y watch and tool a photo and posted it online.

After 4 weeks (20 watches) I decided to stop as the only watches I have left didn't work. So this got me thinking. I have 3 pocket watches and a wristwatch that don't work. 

The pocket watches problems are all "Hair spring" (if that's the correct terminology). The wrist watch is another issue altogether - someone, before I bought it seems to have taken it apart and not put it back together again. 

Anyways.... I decided I'd like ot learn ow to repair mechanical watches for my own enjoyment/ frustration. 

I love the vintage automatics like Seiko 5 and Citizen. I love the cheap, but pretty like Indian military. I'd like to get a few from eBay that are listed as "Spare or repairs" and either repair or build up a bank of spare parts. 

I hope to learn a lot. 

John

 

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Good introduction John, and welcome aboard.  You should find this a very helpful forum, and if you study the repair videos and repair walkthroughs on this site, you will soon get a good idea of what is involved.

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