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My Trio


Vich

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In the last month my treasured Tissot gave up the ghost, as it was a present from my mother I took it for repair where I found that the prices of repair locally (North East) were in the region of £120.00 and the jeweler/watch repair person advised that they would just replace the insides (ETA 955.112).  I thought that was high and decided to research.  To cut a long story short I purchased a new movement from Greece for £16.75 and then realised I could not replace it without removing the stem and crown.  Thanks to the videos on You Tube I became aware of Mark Lovick and so with advice gained as you can see in the photo it is up and running.

 

The Glycine was found by me as a teenager, broken and battered and discarded on the sea shore in Scotland and I picked it up and was about to send it skipping across the water but at a whim put it in my fishing tackle box.  When sorting out my mothers estate and clearing the house 35 years later it resurfaced dried out but battered and I noticed the serial number on the back.  To cut a long story short it was eventually sent to Glycine where it was serviced and was supposed to have a new crystal fitted but when returned I noticed that the crystal had just been polished !  I complained and it was sent back and they fitted a new crystal and returned it along with a complimentary Glycine leather watch strap - result.

 

I have been looking for a practical hobby (other than DIY) since retiring and in my family history research I found that my 3 generations of my family were watchmakers originating Derbyshire - maybe it was a sign.  I have been looking for a pocket watch by Benjamin Harlow (Lane End, Staffs) for a while and have had a casual interest in watches generally. After messing on with my Tissot I ended up watching more and more of Mark's videos and decided to have a shot at repairing for fun only. I decided to set a limit on the funds and started to think about what to do and somehow picked up an interest in Accutrons.  In the end I eventually decided that I would only look at Tissot and Bulova.  With my working background being in IT right back to the days when we used soldering irons I quite liked the idea of the "humming" Accutrons.  Which finally brings me to the third watch, a recent acquisition because if I was going to mess round with them I should of course have a reasonable working example (at  least that was my argument when I told my lovely Wife). 

 

I am building up a stock of Accutron stuff which is being sent to my son in LA and I will pick it up on holiday.  I bougnt an accutron 218 movement on e bay for £23.00 and to my delight when i inserted the Accucell it started humming (even if the rest does not work - project 2) and it sounds identical to my watch so with that and the other stuff to pick up in LA, non working Accutrons 214 and 218, I will have loads to play with.  I am reaching the end of the budget limit now with the purchase of all the tools etc it is quite expensive but judging by the posts and thanks to the interest engendered by watching Mark's videos it looks like fun.

 

So basically I know nothing about watches, have no experience but I can research competently and follow quite complicated instructions - I have not joined a forum before and hope you bear with me and advise whether I inadvertently transgress protocols in some way.

 

regards,

 

Vich

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Good on you, Vich - and more power to your tuning forks! :thumbsu:

I'm just a fiddler, myself - but I do a lot of research on brands and their history. Love the Glycine.

Unfortunately, I have a terrible disease - "watchitis" - basically, I can't stop collecting them! :devil:

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Hi Vich, that' a nice set of watches you've got there, I particularly like the Glycine!

That is a well written introduction. You will find this forum friendly and most informative. It will be interesting to see if you can continue to limit your spend, I set out parameters in the beginning but these soon got blown out of the water! I don't know why, but it's is a very addictive business.

You must keep us informed with the progress of your Accutron projects. I have a nice one myself, but it is one type of movement I will not interfere with due to the incredible sensitivity of the driving pallets.

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Welcome Vich to the forums,  Nice intro,  and as Geo mentioned the Bulova accutron has an extremely delicate drive mechanism which I believe can only be seen or adjusted under a microscope,  so be very careful.  Watches can become addictive so keep a close eye on expenditure as it can easily run amok.

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Hello Folks,

 

I will have to broach the problems about the pawl finger and index finger at some stage but perhaps not quite yet.  I have a 400x USB scope that allows me to look at them but I don't feel confident yet.  The Accutron 214 and 218 service manuals are in the public domain so I expect that someone has uploaded them by now.  Made my last purchase of spare parts today and eagerly await the booty to inspect.  My son is amassing the items, parts and watches, I have bought in the USA and I wiil bring the stuff back with me.

 

Thanks for the warm welcome,

 

Vich

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