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    • By George19
      Hello,
      Now going to tackle my second Seiko repair after fixing a displaced 7S26-C rotor/bearing (posted in another thread). I'm still a newbie at all of this, but learning by watching, reading and doing. I'm really enjoying the work, I wonder why I did not learn this art years ago.
      I was given a Seiko 7009-3040 automatic for free. I took a look at it and saw that is had a bent second hand. Closer inspection showed the little [ S ] emblem has been disconnected from the face and is rolling around between the dial and the face (show here resting next to the 4 o’clock position. It was actually in the day/date window hiding at first. After a bit of tapping it came out.
      I was thinking it might be not too hard to fix?  Separate the  movement from the case of course. Then glue the [ S ] emblem back in place on the dial using a very small amount of super glue. I can see two small holes for mounting. Bend the second hand back to straight.
      So the real questions are
      is super glue OK for this application, I would assume to let the dial stay out of the case for a day or two to protect the rest from 'glue fogging'. looking a the second hand, I'm almost sure it just might break if I try to straiten it? had anyone else seen this happen, the emblem falling off and fouling the hands? Thank you very much in advance.
      Cheers

    • By Mark
      In this video I am correcting a few mistakes I made in the Seiko 7S26 service and lubrication series of videos.
    • By Mark
      In this video I am correcting a few mistakes I made in the Seiko 7S26 service and lubrication series of videos.

      View full YouTube video
    • By anilv
      Hi guys.. Sharing some pics of my latest purchase. 
      An early Seiko 5. This was for sale on  local facebook page and I got it for MYR177 plus MYR10 for shipping.  That's less than USD50 all in. I'm not a fan of these ridged bezels but I was drawn to the clean face as these are getting harder to find. 

      The case back is from Nov '67. Seiko went from the seven digit serial numbers to the six digit ones sometime in '67 so this would be an early one. Oh and a 'proof' case back is always nice! It's a snap back.. Not a front loader. 

      Case looks like its been polished but it's not too bad. 


      Another view of the dial... On most older Seiko's you would find the lume has blackened and this affects an otherwise perfect dial but since this model didn't come with lume it's pretty much perfect. 

      Inside is a 6119 movement... I'm particularly find if this movement and despite the bezel I think this one is a keeper. 
      Anilv 
    • By mlfloyd1
      I replaced the crystal in my Seiko SKX009 but now the crown stem won’t go through once the movement was lined up in the case.
      Any suggestions?
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    • Dont know the longevity of watch straps as I have many watches and wear them at infrequent intervals but I can tell you about leather as I'm into leather as well as watches and I've made belts, wallets, bags, watch straps, purses etc. There are many different kinds of leather with the most durable and hardest to cut being stingray which also is the most expensive. I dulled a blade cutting 1 watch strap then there is alligator, croco, caiman, buffalo, cow, pig etc. and there are many different ways of tanning the leather. Tanneries can tan the same leather and produce soft or hard leather, leather with a grain etc. Full grain leather is the whole thickness of the leather and is the best. Top grain is the top layer of the leather after it has been split to make it thinner and produces the top grain and suede then there are the various fakes starting with PU leather which utilizes the suede left over from making top grain leather. They basically coat the suede with polyurethane to make it look like leather. If you ever bought a cheap belt and after a month it cracked on the top layer this is what you have. The suede part will hold up but the PU part cracked. then there is leatherette and another form of leather where they take the scraps, grind them up and combine with a glue and I think they call this genuine leather. A leather watch strap that is sewn together would be made from top grain leather on top or alligator or whatever and on the bottom a softer, more comfortable leather such as pigskin. Pigskin can last many years, I have a shoe lined with pigskin that I have for about 20 yrs. I put 5-7km on it daily and its lasted. 
    • Hello everyone, I have a quick question on the video i referenced above. At the end Mark discussion about dynamic poising. He shows seven different positions results but at the end  he just has three which is dial up, Pendant Down and Pendant forward(which im assuming is pendant up). My question is are you only supposed to adjust the watch in other positions to ultimately have these three positions the only ones that matter? Other question is what are the most important positions you should adjust for when it comes to wrist watches and pocket watches? I think I might be spending way to much time worrying about adjusting other positions on watch when i really dont have to be. I also know it all depends on the type of watch but if someone could give me like their general rules when it comes to this that would be great.   Thanks
    • I have this Hamilton 974 pocket watch. It is running strong however the minute hand move stops at 12:05 everytime it is set at 12 o'clock (the watch keeps running after the hand stops). I've replaced the cannon pinion, and the center wheel (center wheel was a tiny bit bent which I thought was the problem). I've watched it running and all of the train wheels are moving but the hands are still stopped. Any ideas?
    • I don't have the tool with me unfortunately but I think all that was there is pictured. I think it is just whatever cutting tool that is described in the images that is missing. The top part of the Mimo tool is separate to the lower part which is labelled 1CR1, and the top part rotates freely on the base. The red balance wheel holders are then placed on the top of the tool. The first image in the patent is a vertical cross section through the two parts of tool, illustrating the bearing surfaces.    
    • Interesting tool. Are there any other parts in the box? Are any hidden under the one marked "Mimo"? It just seems that something, or things, are missing, relative to the patent. I'd be interested to see the side view, and perhaps the other side of the "Mimo" part. Good job on tracking down some info on it. It looks like it might do well, providing it is complete. Cheers.
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