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    • By George19
      Hello,
      Now going to tackle my second Seiko repair after fixing a displaced 7S26-C rotor/bearing (posted in another thread). I'm still a newbie at all of this, but learning by watching, reading and doing. I'm really enjoying the work, I wonder why I did not learn this art years ago.
      I was given a Seiko 7009-3040 automatic for free. I took a look at it and saw that is had a bent second hand. Closer inspection showed the little [ S ] emblem has been disconnected from the face and is rolling around between the dial and the face (show here resting next to the 4 o’clock position. It was actually in the day/date window hiding at first. After a bit of tapping it came out.
      I was thinking it might be not too hard to fix?  Separate the  movement from the case of course. Then glue the [ S ] emblem back in place on the dial using a very small amount of super glue. I can see two small holes for mounting. Bend the second hand back to straight.
      So the real questions are
      is super glue OK for this application, I would assume to let the dial stay out of the case for a day or two to protect the rest from 'glue fogging'. looking a the second hand, I'm almost sure it just might break if I try to straiten it? had anyone else seen this happen, the emblem falling off and fouling the hands? Thank you very much in advance.
      Cheers

    • By Mark
      In this video I am correcting a few mistakes I made in the Seiko 7S26 service and lubrication series of videos.
    • By Mark
      In this video I am correcting a few mistakes I made in the Seiko 7S26 service and lubrication series of videos.

      View full YouTube video
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    • How are you holding the screw for polishing? Typically it would be held in a tripod tool if going for a flat polish. I would recommend a couple of paper steps before polishing, I typically use 20 micron for serious flattening then 12 micron and go straight from there (after cleaning) to diamond paste, Aluminum is not a good substrate for polishing, the surface oxidizes in minutes and that is as hard as ruby. If you don't want to find or make a tin or zinc plate, thick plexiglass works well. Roughen the surface with a clean file before using.
    • polishing or restoring screw heads is an art !       with a lathe (or a drill press)  cut the head and then go to "wet and dry" sand paper to 1,000 grit,   you are done.  the slots are a whole different art.     vin  
    • The original application to build the "UK Time Corporation" factory that became Timex Dundee was posted by Timex in January 1946, according to this article. https://www.eveningtelegraph.co.uk/2016/01/29/dundees-timex-new-group-to-archive-stories-of-controversial-factory/ Production began in the early fifties and Timex produced watches and a variety of other hi-tec products there for 47 years. Little remains of the factory complex now, most of that area of Dundee having been "redeveloped" into the usual collection of out of town shopping centers and small industrial units.
    • Doubt that diamond paste will be effective on a filed surface as it will be 'rough' by polished standards.  ! would start with wet&dry papers going down to 2500 grit then go onto the polishing pastes.  Thoroughly clean after every grit/paste size and do on a flat plate.  Dialux bar polishing medium (grey I think for steel) may be better than diamond paste.
    • Quite cool pice of history..
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