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    • By George19
      Hello,
      Now going to tackle my second Seiko repair after fixing a displaced 7S26-C rotor/bearing (posted in another thread). I'm still a newbie at all of this, but learning by watching, reading and doing. I'm really enjoying the work, I wonder why I did not learn this art years ago.
      I was given a Seiko 7009-3040 automatic for free. I took a look at it and saw that is had a bent second hand. Closer inspection showed the little [ S ] emblem has been disconnected from the face and is rolling around between the dial and the face (show here resting next to the 4 o’clock position. It was actually in the day/date window hiding at first. After a bit of tapping it came out.
      I was thinking it might be not too hard to fix?  Separate the  movement from the case of course. Then glue the [ S ] emblem back in place on the dial using a very small amount of super glue. I can see two small holes for mounting. Bend the second hand back to straight.
      So the real questions are
      is super glue OK for this application, I would assume to let the dial stay out of the case for a day or two to protect the rest from 'glue fogging'. looking a the second hand, I'm almost sure it just might break if I try to straiten it? had anyone else seen this happen, the emblem falling off and fouling the hands? Thank you very much in advance.
      Cheers

    • By Mark
      In this video I am correcting a few mistakes I made in the Seiko 7S26 service and lubrication series of videos.
    • By Mark
      In this video I am correcting a few mistakes I made in the Seiko 7S26 service and lubrication series of videos.

      View full YouTube video
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    • What the problem here is for your question is Mark's video is confusing. Normally when you do a balance staff you would statically poise first then sometimes dynamically poise. If your dynamic poising you use eight pendant positions usually. So in his video he comments for this particular watch he is dynamic poising. Then adjusting to positions is an interesting term or as your question is which positions should you worry about timekeeping in? Basically what you're doing by timing the watch on the timing machine in a variety of positions is your verifying the watch does keep time in those positions.  So for pocket watches dial up and crown up are the most common. For wristwatches I'm attaching what Omega recommends for their watches
    • check each as old hippy said but end shakes on a 3rd wheel allow a lot more play than lets say a balance or escape. you can get away with too much end shake and not loose much amplitude, too little will def not work though and will def result in a very low amp and or stop the movement. train wheels being loose is always better than too tight in my opinion
    • its farfo.com dont put the www. or just google farfo vintage watches ridgewood nj. archer is a memeber on teh Watchuseek forums and is very good esp when it comes to high end watches like omega. he is a certified omega repairer, not many of those around. he uses the same equipment they uses at the omega facilities. 100,000s worth of equipment
    • Try winding through the ratchet wheel, put screwdriver in the wheels slot,turn to wind , should wind full.
    • I made light pressure on the second wheel from underneath and the movement is now running fine. Will check again tomorrow.    
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