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    • By Padd
      Hello Everyone,
      Padd here from the UK.
      It all started with a desire to fix a Submariner replica I bought off a lucky lucky man in Pisa, Italy while on a European tour.
      Next thing I know I'm investigating Submariner replicas and building my own, signed by me, using a Seagull ST2130 movement, adventure watch.
      Now I'm hooked, I took inspiration from Marks videos, now I'm happily starting to work on parts of the movement, and have recovered one or two movements where the stem came out, but wouldn't stay back in. I have built a few watches for friends and relations, but now I need to be able to service them when they come back to me.
      I also have a couple of movements that run really badly, so I will be practising on those over the winter weekends. Full repair/servicing kit IS my Christmas present.
      I really want to get one of those ST2130's, serviced and tweaked by me, doing a -------------------------- on my timegrapher. not a -.'-.'''--,'.'.' (and worse) that they do at the moment.
      I wont start to list my watch collection, but it runs from a Casio digital to a Rolex pocket watch with Seikos, Citizens, Omegas and home builds in the mix.
      Must do Mark's course, but I'm afraid I may have already learned 60+% of it already.

    • By PJA
      Just in case, I came across this "Watch-O-Scope" software. To those who have a need for it. Also here is an instructional video how to install. I hope it will help somebody here.
    • By maclerche
      I have gotten hold on a Elma Star vibrograf. Does anyone know if you can still buy paper and carbon for this machine?  
       

    • By SteveT
      I was wondering how do the timegrapher phone app's out there compare to a dedicated bench top machine. I'm guessing it's all down to the piezoelectric pickup? I installed tickoprint on my phone the other day. But to get the full features you need to shell out $30, if you then also have to shell out for a piezoelectric mic, then you are almost at the same price point as a cheap chinese bench top machine!
       
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    • Hi Everyone, New to this. Have a pocket watch as seen in the pictures. I've stripped it down so far. I have done a bit of quick learning by researching it. I believe it is turn of the century. All parts are serial numbered the same 12796. It's not a fusee but not sure if it is a "going" or "motor" barrel. The mainspring may be a T End and I am still working out size needed. From the pics is there a diagram somewhere for parts? Is this an English watch or is it one of the turn of the century mass imported American one?  I believe it was sold by a "watchmaker" R. Richardson who may have only been a seller. The case is silver and hallmarked as shown possibly 1895? The case maker I believe is C.H possibly Charles Horner. Who is the watchmaker is the big question. Whats parts are missing? Any help would be great as I am itching to put it all back together again. I will need some hands for the dial as well, if anyone can advise it would be appreciated. There are also inscribed numbers on this inside of the case, servicing references maybe? Thanks.
    • If you intend to work on PWs only, you will surely need no winders for ladies WW. You could get a coarse idea of the needed winder sizes if you take half of the movement diameter minus 20%. Frank
    • Hiya, Thank you for the offer!!! I don’t have a specific spring I’m working on now. I’ve been buying the supplies and equipment I need and have picked up a few pocket watches to take apart, clean, and put together. Some are missing parts. Once i start taking them apart I’ll definitely be posting pics and reaching out Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    • Yes, I don't think they've been made for some time and any offered as new were/are remains of old stock. There was a time even in the 70s as mechanical watches were heading toward supposed extinction that women churned out piecework of vibrated springs matched to balances from home. They'd have a Greiner Spiromatic and some killer tweezers and do this stuff at a speed and precision that's unbelievable. I'm almost sure the lady I met at Parmigiani from the post above was one of these workers, pulled in from semiretirement. There's no demand for such tools now and there's enough on the used market to satisfy the collectors and occasional users. My set has been updated numerous times in the last 20 years as I found better examples to replace the ones I had, selling off the lesser pieces. Being in Switzerland we're a bit spoiled as you stumble upon this stuff at random flea markets. I found a selection of screw slotting files a few months back, really fine ones they don't make anymore, for two bucks a piece, new old stock.
    • Save your money, the tweezers in the hswalsh link is of little use. OH did a very good job finding this tool, but it is the smallest of the set, too small for gents- or pocketwatches. I suppose it is the remains of a long sold stock. My old Bergeon catalog shows them, but they were no more available when the catalog was issued. Frank
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