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    • By FitOutPost
      Hi, my name is Ross. I am a rookie watch enthusiast and I am really puzzled here.
      Could someone explain to me what kind of a problem am I facing with my timegrapher?
      I do two sets of measurements with the same watch (1 day or 6 days apart) and receive vastly different results - to the point of being completely different from what I observe in real life. 
      For example, my timegrapher shows that my watch is running fast (or ahead of time), while in real life I observe that it runs 7 seconds per day behind. I even recorded a video about it so you could see it for yourself: https://youtu.be/mhGzf6aLMlY
      How should I interpret that? Am I doing anything wrong?

      Problem_with_Timegrapher_-_Knowledge_Sharing__16.mp4
    • By east3rn
      Hello. 
      I am working on a vtg. Citizen cal.7520 automatic movement.
      I have put the watch on the timegrapher 
      The graph looks OK but the beat error shows 9.9ms. I presumed that beat error should be around 1.0~2.0 given the shape of the graph.
      Is the beat error actually bad or the timegrapher is wrong??
      Thank you!
       

    • By Padd
      Hello Everyone,
      Padd here from the UK.
      It all started with a desire to fix a Submariner replica I bought off a lucky lucky man in Pisa, Italy while on a European tour.
      Next thing I know I'm investigating Submariner replicas and building my own, signed by me, using a Seagull ST2130 movement, adventure watch.
      Now I'm hooked, I took inspiration from Marks videos, now I'm happily starting to work on parts of the movement, and have recovered one or two movements where the stem came out, but wouldn't stay back in. I have built a few watches for friends and relations, but now I need to be able to service them when they come back to me.
      I also have a couple of movements that run really badly, so I will be practising on those over the winter weekends. Full repair/servicing kit IS my Christmas present.
      I really want to get one of those ST2130's, serviced and tweaked by me, doing a -------------------------- on my timegrapher. not a -.'-.'''--,'.'.' (and worse) that they do at the moment.
      I wont start to list my watch collection, but it runs from a Casio digital to a Rolex pocket watch with Seikos, Citizens, Omegas and home builds in the mix.
      Must do Mark's course, but I'm afraid I may have already learned 60+% of it already.

    • By PJA
      Just in case, I came across this "Watch-O-Scope" software. To those who have a need for it. Also here is an instructional video how to install. I hope it will help somebody here.
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    • I’m inclined to agree with what JohnR says. But I’d also like to add some of my own cynicism which is that I think that the snake oil manufacturers will sell you anything if they can see a gap in the market.  But, I can see why it makes sense to have something very slippery and less likely to be pushed away than a light synthetic oil. That possibly is more important for high beat movement where there is a greater velocity.  With regards to “which is best”, I don’t think anyone should offer any opinions unless they have revisited work they have completed over a span of several years. I’ve been using 9415 for several years, but I’m yet to investigate its effectiveness long term. 
    • Klassiker, The questions you asked are great questions and questions that should be asked. First off, annealing can be a long precision process. Most watchmakers have come up with various home grown methods over many years. There are some videos by Steffen Pahlow where he anneals material with an alcohol lamp. It has been awhile since I have watched  it but I believe he encased the part with some brass tubing and heated everything with the lamp. I have a computer controlled kiln that can reduce temperature in controlled increments over time. The kiln was expensive and is probably not on the wish list of most watchmakers. The main concept is to reduce the temperature slowly, in steps, over a long time period.  Most watchmakers do not have hardness testing equipment but you will certainly know if the material is "soft" when you machine it. Drill rod is a generic term for small diameter shaft material that has been ground on a centerless  grinder. It is generally offered in Inch, letter and number diameters in relitavely  short (3 foot)  lengths. It is usually offered in oil hardening (O1,O2), water hardening (W1,W2), and air hardening (A1,A2) steels. The O,W and A designators refer to the chemical composition of the steels. It also implies that the steel is to be hardened by quenching in oil, water or air. Since air quenching has the least amount of temperature differential, it produces the least amount of distoration and cracking in the quenching process. It is used a lot in high precision applications such as stamping dies. Water hardening tool steels are far less expensive then the oil and air hardening steels and are used in lower precision applications such as knives and scissors. For some reason the W composition of drill rod has become the favorite for watch staffs.  david
    • I knew that Ronda offers Swiss made movement and Swiss parts movements. Typically the gold colored movements are Swiss made and the silver are Swiss parts. Out of curiosity, I popped the back off and.... Ronda 515... Silver plates.... Swiss in spirit only, lol. Thanks again @yankeedog
    • Well  my Florida brother. I hate to burst your bubble, BUT. Your pro diver  may or may not have a swiss  movement..most likely  it is a ronda 515...which may or may not  have come from Thailand. Ronda,a swiss  company  outsources there.some 515s are swiss,some are Thai. With invicta  it is really  the luck  of the draw. I like  your kirovskie  idea. Just be aware that that watch is not shock  protected..so you can NEVER  drop it.A quick  look  at them online reveals  a movement  that I think is a poljot  2409 with  without  shock protection...these movements  run well  for  a very long time. A have a few that  came in cheapo sixties  watches,that  run as well  or better  than  my cheapo swiss  watches of  the same era.
    • I just got this one and of course the crystal needs to be polished out, but the question is what battery did it take and how is it supposed to stay in place? Is there a battery holder missing? I can set a 39- negative down on it and press the back on carefully and it will run since the positive contacts the case, but surely that isn’t all there is to it. Has anyone else seen one like this? Steve         There is a clip in ring inside the back cover that may be part of the answer.     Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
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