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    • By deathkei
      Hello
      I measured my Omega Caliber 1120 through an timegrapher app. (Dial Up, full wind)
      I know the app is not very accurate.

      I checked about +100s/d difference and sharply tilted graph .
      The odd thing is that the bottom part of the graph is not printed every 100+- seconds.(red-colored circle)
      Is this a feature of the timegrapher, or does it indicate abnormal state of movement component?
       
      Thank you for the comments.
    • By FitOutPost
      Hi, my name is Ross. I am a rookie watch enthusiast and I am really puzzled here.
      Could someone explain to me what kind of a problem am I facing with my timegrapher?
      I do two sets of measurements with the same watch (1 day or 6 days apart) and receive vastly different results - to the point of being completely different from what I observe in real life. 
      For example, my timegrapher shows that my watch is running fast (or ahead of time), while in real life I observe that it runs 7 seconds per day behind. I even recorded a video about it so you could see it for yourself: https://youtu.be/mhGzf6aLMlY
      How should I interpret that? Am I doing anything wrong?

      Problem_with_Timegrapher_-_Knowledge_Sharing__16.mp4
    • By east3rn
      Hello. 
      I am working on a vtg. Citizen cal.7520 automatic movement.
      I have put the watch on the timegrapher 
      The graph looks OK but the beat error shows 9.9ms. I presumed that beat error should be around 1.0~2.0 given the shape of the graph.
      Is the beat error actually bad or the timegrapher is wrong??
      Thank you!
       

    • By Padd
      Hello Everyone,
      Padd here from the UK.
      It all started with a desire to fix a Submariner replica I bought off a lucky lucky man in Pisa, Italy while on a European tour.
      Next thing I know I'm investigating Submariner replicas and building my own, signed by me, using a Seagull ST2130 movement, adventure watch.
      Now I'm hooked, I took inspiration from Marks videos, now I'm happily starting to work on parts of the movement, and have recovered one or two movements where the stem came out, but wouldn't stay back in. I have built a few watches for friends and relations, but now I need to be able to service them when they come back to me.
      I also have a couple of movements that run really badly, so I will be practising on those over the winter weekends. Full repair/servicing kit IS my Christmas present.
      I really want to get one of those ST2130's, serviced and tweaked by me, doing a -------------------------- on my timegrapher. not a -.'-.'''--,'.'.' (and worse) that they do at the moment.
      I wont start to list my watch collection, but it runs from a Casio digital to a Rolex pocket watch with Seikos, Citizens, Omegas and home builds in the mix.
      Must do Mark's course, but I'm afraid I may have already learned 60+% of it already.

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    • Isn't the impulse jewel common to both movements? Since the "C" has a jewelled barrel arbor hole which isn't jewelled on the "B", in order for the jewel count to be correct for both movements the "B" must have a jewelled bearing that is not jewelled on the "C". It would be interesting to see what aspect of the "C" was improved by removing a jewel, even if it just turns out to be the cost of manufacture.
    • Awww. Mine are definitely much better JDR. . To be honest I don’t know, but that’s certainly an enviable display of screwdrivers. The grips aside, the main improvement I found was the precision ground stainless steel blade. Nice display box! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    • Isopropanol will soften and wash away the shellac. Take care with the balance and pallet fork. Just a quick dip of a few seconds, then straight onto watch paper to take off the excess, then use a puffer to dry the critical areas where the shellac bonds on the jewels. After 4 years using lighter fluid and thinking I was getting parts clean, I now use Elma watch cleaning product. Amazing how I fooled myself about how clean was clean. Also, try an ultrasonic which are very cheap nowadays. In general, IPA (isopropyl alcohol)is not a good cleaner, but is good for the final fine rinse if done quickly. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    • In order to properly service the movement you absolutely should remove the wheel so that you can clean any contaminated or degraded oil away (which if left could very easily result in premature wear and failure even if the side shake is acceptable now) and relubricate with fresh oil.  A dedicated 5 spoke wheel puller is the best way to go as it pulls at the hub, eliminating the risk of deforming the wheel, but not the only way. The important thing is to pull the wheel straight up with no twisting or canting of the wheel since the arbor is brittle and will snap sooner than bend. This can be achieved using two thin blades worked under the wheel from opposite sides to gradually wedge the wheel up. You may need to protect the bridge with some paper or tape to prevent scratches, and you need to use blades that are only very slightly thicker than the gap between the wheel and the bridge because you need to progress slowly, and don't be tempted to twist the blades. As long as the force is straight up in line with the arbor, and gradual enough to not deform the wheel, you should be alright. 
    • Discharge barrel power, then feel the side shake on the wheel( independently driven minute wheel), if no excessive side shake or other faults, just leave the wheel where it is, do not remove it.       
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