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Omega 1337 Quartz Movement Complete Service


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Hello fellow watch freaks.

It's been a while since I've posted a service walkthrough, but I had an accident that destroyed my left shoulder and needed surgery.  It's been a rough 6 months for me, with a LOT of soul searching throughout my recovery period.  But I'm back on the bench ... at least at home anyway; work is a different matter, and my close friends on this forum know about that ... nuff said.

This watch is owned by one of my older brother's friends.  My older brother is one of the most selfless people I know, and has always been there for me.  So when he asked me to do this for him it became TOP priority.

It was the first item his friend purchased after he left school and began work: so there's a lot of good memories tied to this watch.

As you can see it's an older quartz Seamaster with an 1337 Movement.

Omega1337-1.jpg

On first inspection you can see water damage to the Dial @ 3 o'clock.  So I wasn't expecting to see a happy movement inside.

Omega1337-2.jpg

But when I got the Caseback off things didn't look too bad at all. Just a bit of corrosion from a cheap nasty Chinese battery. 

Omega1337-3.jpg

The movement still looked nice and shiny and the Stem only had a touch of rust up near the Crown. 
So this watch looks like one we can save :)

Omega1337-4.jpg

Disassembly

OK, lets begin.  Fist remove the Hands and Dial from the movement.

Omega1337-5.jpg

Again, absolutely no moisture damage under the Dial ... this made me VERY happy indeed.

Omega1337-6.jpg

So on to the Movement Holder it goes.
Remove the Battery Clamp and Insulator Ring.

Omega1337-7.jpg

Then remove the 4 screws that hold the Circuit Cover.

Omega1337-8.jpg

Note that there is an insulator under the cover.  It is very delicate, so great care should be taken when handling it.

Omega1337-9.jpg

Once the cover is removed the circuit is exposed; but before removing it, unscrew the 2 screws holding the Coil Protector and remove it.

Omega1337-10.jpg

Then unscrew the Coil, and remove the Circuit and Coil.

Omega1337-11.jpg

Place both the Circuit and Coil in a safe place to avoid damage, as this parts are obsolete, and if damaged you'll have to scour the internet for a donor movement ... good luck with that!!

Omega1337-12.jpg

Next remove the Train Bridge

Omega1337-13.jpg

Here is a reference photo of the train. As you can see, the Rotor is a very different looking animal to the modern ETA rotors.
Carefully remove all the wheels, and store the Rotor in a safe place AWAY from the rest of the parts to be cleaned ... as this has to be hand cleaned due to it being magnetic.

Omega1337-14.jpg

Please Note: There is a very small washer that fits between the minute wheel and the extended pivot of the Second Wheel. 
Be sure to identify it, and make sure it's put in the small parts container for cleaning.

Omega1337-23.jpg

Here's the complete train removed from the movement for reference.

Omega1337-24.jpg

Flip the movement over in the holder and remove the 3 screws of the cover that holds the Calendar Ring.

Omega1337-15.jpg

As you can see that Motion Work and Calendar Work are fairly complex on this movement.
Make sure you take good reference photos and study them carefully so they are not confused with wheels of the train.

Omega1337-16.jpg

Remove the Calendar Ring.

Omega1337-17.jpg

Remove the Motion Work and Calendar Work.

Omega1337-18.jpg

Here's the complete Motion Work and Calendar Work removed from the movement for reference.

Omega1337-19.jpg

The Crown and Clutch should now be able to be removed.

Omega1337-20.jpg

Flip the movement over once again to tackle the Keyless Work
Unscrew and remove the Setting Lever Spring.

Omega1337-21.jpg

Lastly unscrew and remove the Setting Lever, Intermediate Wheel and Yoke.

Omega1337-22.jpg

The Omega 1337 Movement is now completely disassembled and ready for cleaning.

I will post the assembly soon.
 

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Thanks for all your kind words my friends :)

Now I've spent some quality time with the 1337, I have an addendum to add to the disassembly instructions; but unfortunately I can't go back and edit the original post.

There is a second magnetic part that MUST BE CLEAN BY HAND, AND NOT PUT IN THE CLEANING MACHINE.

The Omega 1337 movement uses 2 wheels magnetically coupled as the Cannon Pinion (Friction Point).  As I don't have the Omega Schematic at present I'm not sure of the correct terminology for this part.

Below is the location and an image of it pulled apart.  Make sure the surfaces between the wheels are spotless clean, as any contamination will great affect the function of time setting.

Omega1337-26.jpg

The movement is all back together, and I have LOTS of photos I have to edit and upload.  So please be patient and I'll have the assemble instruction up later today.

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Unfortunately I do not have an exploded diagram of this movement, with the correct terminology for the parts or the factory oiling procedures.  The following is my own procedure for assembly, and I will leave the oiling to your own discretion.  Personally I used Moebius Quartz Oil and Moebius 9501 for the Keyless Work.

If anyone has a copy of the 1337 Technical Document please upload it to assist others.

 Assembly

I started with the Keyless Work...

Lubricate the Stem and install the Sliding Pinion and Stem.  Also screw in the Setting Lever Screw.

Omega1337-27.jpg

Install the Yoke and place the arm into the slot in the Sliding Pinion, and replace the Setting Lever.

Omega1337-28.jpg

Install the Setting Wheel and fasten down.

Omega1337-29.jpg

The last part of the Keyless Work to be installed is the Setting Lever Spring.

Omega1337-30.jpg

Next install the train...

Install the Minute Wheel, being sure to replace the small washer.

Omega1337-23.jpg

Omega1337-31.jpg

Install the Intermediate Wheel and the Second Wheel Driving Pinion.

Omega1337-32.jpg

Next install the Second Wheel.

Omega1337-33.jpg

The lower jewel for Rotor is a blind pivot point, this needs to be lubricated BEFORE installing the Rotor.

Omega1337-34.jpg

Install the Rotor.

Omega1337-35.jpg

And lastly install the Third Wheel.

Omega1337-36.jpg

Carefully install the Train Bridge, be careful to check the free running of the train before tightening fully.

Omega1337-37.jpg

Next flip the movement over and proceed to install the Motion and Calendar Work.

Firstly make sure the Magnetic Friction Wheels (Cannon Pinion) are very clean.  Especially the flat plates between the wheels.

Omega1337-38.jpg

Install the Magnetic Friction Wheels (Cannon Pinion)

Omega1337-39.jpg

Then install the Calendar Setting Wheel.

Omega1337-40.jpg

Next install the Motion Work Setting Wheel.

Omega1337-41.jpg

Install the Intermediate Date Wheel.

Omega1337-42.jpg

Lastly is the Date Indicator Driving Wheel and the Hour Wheel.

Omega1337-43.jpg

Now all the wheels are installed you have to time the Calendar Setting Wheel, Intermediate Date Wheel, and Date Indicator Driving Wheel.  This will take some study to setup correctly without the documentation; but take your time and you'll find it will become obvious how these wheels interact with each other.

Once you have set the timing up, replace the Calendar Ring and Date Indicator Maintaining Plate.  Then gently hold the plate down with a piece of Pegwood, and with the Crown in the second position, work the wheels and test that the pivots are located in their jewels and the timing of the Calendar Work is correct.

Omega1337-44.jpg

Once you are completely satisfied that everything is working as intended, screw down the plate.

Omega1337-45.jpg

Flip the movement over again and replace the Battery Insulator.

Omega1337-46.jpg

Install the Coil.

Omega1337-47.jpg

Install the Circuit and Circuit Insulator.

Omega1337-48.jpg

Replace the Electronic Module Cover.

Omega1337-49.jpg

Next replace the Coil Protector.

Omega1337-50.jpg

Install the Battery Insulating Ring.

Omega1337-51.jpg

Install the Battery Clamp.

Please Note: The Battery for this movement is the 391/381.

Omega1337-52.jpg

Lastly install the Dial and Hands.

Omega1337-54.jpg

This completes the assembly of the Omega 1337 Movement.  I hope this walkthrough gives you the confidence, steps and reference photos to tackle this movement yourself.

 

Edited by Lawson
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Hi Lawson,

Great pictures and amazing results but that was already known! Very, very good job! Thank you and more because I know how hard it must be for you going to all this trouble at this time. Much appreciated!

Cheers,

Bob

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Hi Lawson

I am very sorry to hear about your Accident, wish you all the best and a speedy recovery[emoji1303]

p.s. I finally bought a L&R Master watch cleaning machine, thanks for all the input and helping me decide on a cleaner. will post some pics soon.

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  • 7 months later...

Lawson - excellent article on the omega 1337.

Can I ask 2 questions please. Is the watch glass a press fit?

1. The watch has only sentimental value and having bought a new glass I am finding difficulty finding a jeweller in the Ruislip area who can fit the glass for me which leads me to think it is difficult and beyond my to fit it with a press.

2. The winder and spindle does not engage and comes off it my hand when I pull it out. I have looked at your walk through which shows how to access the levers. Is it straightforward to reset them?

Other than the above, the watch is keeping good time but obviously cant be worn without the glass.

I would appreciate your advice

regards

Chas G

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  • 11 months later...

Good article. Helped me a lot when i serviced my 1332. (nb: use non-magnetic tweezers!) In addition to the parts shown i also removed what's called the corrector and the lower magnetic screen to completely stip the main plate.

One important comment: the circuit insulator (the plastic cover for the electronic module shown in pic 21 in the assembly-post) goes below the electronic module, as the way it's cut out suggests.

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  • 3 months later...
  • 8 months later...

I know this is an old thread, but would anyone be able to give me some help on how I would fix this corrosion? I am just starting out in watch repair and I picked this omega up for a bargain price, and when I opened the back up the old dead battery had been left in it for ages.

picture attached. 

Ollie

F7EE4F9E-8F64-4D8E-B1C1-DC7C5ACF66F4.jpeg

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hi guys, sorry to necro this thread as my first act as a new member. I promise I'll introduce myself properly soon.

Thank you for putting this together [mention=246]lawson[/mention]. It's given me the confidence to attempt a strip down, clean, and service of a non-running 1337 I recently obtained in a job lot. Hopefully gummy oils and not a failed circuit (coil tests ok) are the problem.

Anyway, I've stripped it down and cleaned the plates and gear train in my ultrasonic (excluding the rotor). I noted the need to dry clean the magnetic rotor and canon pinion separately as discussed above. I also noted the suggestion to pay close attention to the small washer(s) between the second and centre wheels. However, I did clean them in the ultrasonic. I've just found a service guide for the practically identical 1332 movement and it recommends removing the two washer between these wheels and dry cleaning them. The guide mentions that they're magnetic and should be placed so as to repel each other (presumably in place of lubrication). I've added the guide here. I hope I'm not breaking any rules re the size of attachments to be hosted by the site.

Having cleaned them in my ultrasonic, am I likely to have demagnetised them? Were you using an ultrasonic or a proper rotary parts cleaner, [mention=246]Lawson[/mention] and how did you go?

IMG_0569.thumb.jpg.816a92c3295e3e3858ca25b52297639e.jpg

1332.pdf

 

 

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Hi guys, sorry to necro this thread as my first act as a new member. I promise I'll introduce myself properly soon.
Thank you for putting this together [mention=246]lawson[/mention]. It's given me the confidence to attempt a strip down, clean, and service of a non-running 1337 I recently obtained in a job lot. Hopefully gummy oils and not a failed circuit (coil tests ok) are the problem.
Anyway, I've stripped it down and cleaned the plates and gear train in my ultrasonic (excluding the rotor). I noted the need to dry clean the magnetic rotor and canon pinion separately as discussed above. I also noted the suggestion to pay close attention to the small washer(s) between the second and centre wheels. However, I did clean them in the ultrasonic. I've just found a service guide for the practically identical 1332 movement and it recommends removing the two washer between these wheels and dry cleaning them. The guide mentions that they're magnetic and should be placed so as to repel each other (presumably in place of lubrication). I've added the guide here. I hope I'm not breaking any rules re the size of attachments to be hosted by the site.
Having cleaned them in my ultrasonic, am I likely to have demagnetised them? Were you using an ultrasonic or a proper rotary parts cleaner, [mention=246]Lawson[/mention] and how did you go?
IMG_0569.thumb.jpg.816a92c3295e3e3858ca25b52297639e.jpg
1332.pdf
 
 

Hello matey!
I’m interested in why / how US cleaning would demagnetise these washers? Firing cavitated micro bubbles at something would be fine I would think, although I’m not up on physics to a particularly high level. Have you found that they are demagged or tested them?


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Hello matey!
I’m interested in why / how US cleaning would demagnetise these washers? Firing cavitated micro bubbles at something would be fine I would think, although I’m not up on physics to a particularly high level. Have you found that they are demagged or tested them?


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G'day Pip.
Well my thought was that if you drop a magnet you upset the highly regular polarisation of the elements and it loses its magnetism (sorry if I'm a bit vague on that, high school science was a long time ago).
If the transducer is vibrating the sides of the unltrasonic (again, my assumption which may not be the way it works) and the parts are sitting inside a jar likewise being vibrated, might that vibration not transfer to the parts, having the same effect as dropping a magnet - messing up the ordered polarisation of the elements?
I haven't had a chance yet to have another look at the parts yet - will have to wait until the weekend - to see what's going on magnetism wise.



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