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mousekar

What's The Difference With Moebius 8000??

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Hello All!

New to the forum and relatively new to watch repair. I tried looking for the answer to my question before posting and haven't found anything as of yet, so if I missed it, I apologize.

I wanted to know a bit more about the Moebius 8000 watch oils. Specifically the 8000 and 8141. When I look at a lubrication chart, I see these listed along side the 9010 and D5. Are these viable alternatives? They tend to be more cost effective. Are the 9000's synthetic and the 8000's not?

Will the 8000's work for the slower pocket watches, but not higher beat rate watches?

Here is the chart I am referring to:

2371a0f3ebaccabd80bf91b2a6c6824a.jpg

Thanks in advance for the knowledge! This forum is fantastic!

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For what it's worth, I chose the 8000 series in ignorance when I started out. They are cheaper, but the shelf life is only 2-3 years. Buy the smallest quantity you can... Whatever you choose, don't be drawn in by buying more to get a lower price, you will never use it before it goes out of date!

S

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StuartBaker104, I can get onboard with that. Just wasn't sure if that was the only real difference, or if the synthetics are better in other ways. Nobody that I've read ever brings them up when suggesting oils to purchase, so I wanted to see what the opinions were on the stuff. Guess I'm trying to figure out if it's still a quality oil, just with a much more limited shelf life.

I did read somewhere, that back in the day when pocket watches were king, that the expected time between services was about a year, and now it's more like 5-6. But if I'm servicing my own, then can I use these oils knowing I'll need to service them more often.

Then again, I've also read that every time you take them apart, there is always a chance that you take. Which I can DEFINITELY attest to.

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Question on watch oils, if they only have a shelf life of 2-3 years what is their service life in use?

You expect to get about 5 years from a service, if the oil only lasts for 2-3 years in a sealed container what chance in the environment of a watch movement.

 

Max

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Hey bob, I think I read somewhere else on here that you can use 9010 on the pallet jewels in a pinch. I think it may have been you, which is why I'm asking, but what are your thoughts with that?

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I think it is the first column?

 

Moebius is highly inconsistent and incomplete in their own application chart, that probably has not been updated in 30 years.

Their specialize pallet jewels oil is supposed 914 or 9145, about which it has been written:

 

9415 remains a grease until impact of the pallet, at which time it momentarily liquefies. This keeps lubricant where it belongs and away from the many parts of the escapement where it does not belong

 

Believe that if you wish.

Edited by jdm

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I think it may have been you, which is why I'm asking, but what are your thoughts with that?

 

err yes,...I've said that before but if pressed I only do so on slow beat movements. If you don't have 914 at hand (or don't want to invest on it and make Swatch richer....mmmm, shame on you! ) that's the solution...you are still making Swatch rich!!! I know they are everywhere even in the oil, it is a nightmare!!

 

In any case, 9145 works well in all movements for that function low and high beat. So there you have it, now you know where your money will go!!!

 

      :D

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

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Hey bob, I think I read somewhere else on here that you can use 9010 on the pallet jewels in a pinch. I think it may have been you, which is why I'm asking, but what are your thoughts with that?

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The chart in the first post confirms this. There was a time before 9145 existed and 8000 or 9010 was the recommendation. If it was ok when the watch was new, then why not now?

I used 8000 on pallet jewels before I bought some 9145.

S

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Thanks everyone. The watches that I'm currently working on are a Hamilton 917 and a Waltham Os trench watch. Like Bob said I'll have to save up for the 9145, as I just bought the D5 and Molykote DX. Sounds like I'll be ok for now with the 9010 on the pallet jewels for those, but 9145 will be the next purchase.

Also thanks for the clarification on the chart.

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Thanks everyone. The watches that I'm currently working on are a Hamilton 917 and a Waltham Os trench watch. Like Bob said I'll have to save up for the 9145, as I just bought the D5 and Molykote DX. Sounds like I'll be ok for now with the 9010 on the pallet jewels for those, but 9145 will be the next purchase.

Also thanks for the clarification on the chart.

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I just sprung for some 9145 and now I have all the oil I will ever need; I think.

9010, 9415, 8013, 9104 (HP 1300), D5, KT22. About 250 bucks in oil. Hell, I'm in the oil business I guess

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I would have only chosen between HP1300 and D5 and bought only one of the two. They are equivalents being the HP much more expensive but with a longer shelf life and synthetic.

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After reading this, I may have chosen the wrong oils.  I use 8000 for the Escape Wheel, Balance, Gear train and pallet fork pivots.  I use 914 on the pallet jewels and 8030 on the winding mech and spring.  For the center wheel, I use D5.  Should I be using 9010 instead of the 8000?  Crap, I'm the idiot that bought three jars of it too.... :cold:  The movements I work on are always vintage and are typically low beat.

Edited by jeffc83

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Jeff,

8000 is fine, just don't oil the pallet pivots on movements below 12 ligne. Above 9 ligne you should use your D5 for the train wheels not 8000. See the table in the first post for confirmation of this.

941 came out after the table was produced, but was made for pallet jewels.

8030 is clock oil, do you mean 8300 for the winding mech and spring?

S

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Jeff,

8000 is fine, just don't oil the pallet pivots on movements below 12 ligne. Above 9 ligne you should use your D5 for the train wheels not 8000. See the table in the first post for confirmation of this.

941 came out after the table was produced, but was made for pallet jewels.

8030 is clock oil, do you mean 8300 for the winding mech and spring?

S

 

Thanks VERY much for that advice my friend, I've been using 8000 on train wheels until now;)  Thanks again for the quick response!

 

Darn typo, yes, I meant 8300 for the mech and mainspring.  Should I be using 8200 or is 8300 acceptable?

 

EDIT:  If anyone is interested in 8000, I have PLENTY;)

Edited by jeffc83

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If anyone is interested in 8000, I have PLENTY;)

I might be interested in the 8000.  How much are you willing to let it go for?   I read somewhere that, if you were only going to use one oil for all pivots, 8000 was the way to go.  Amy truth to that?  Also, 8000 is a natural oil.  Should I be switching to a synthetic instead?  Total newbie here.

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I might be interested in the 8000.  How much are you willing to let it go for?   I read somewhere that, if you were only going to use one oil for all pivots, 8000 was the way to go.  Amy truth to that?  Also, 8000 is a natural oil.  Should I be switching to a synthetic instead?  Total newbie here.

 

Welcome!!!  I prefer the natural oil.  I'll look up what I paid for the 3 and divide it:)

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I paid just under 7 US dollars per vial.  I have no idea what this stuff would even cost to ship but wouldn't think It would be much...

I truly do appreciate the offer, but with shipping, that would be what I'm already paying, so I will have to pass on the oil.  But thanks for the offer, and for the advice.

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