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Seiko Sportsmatic 7625-8293


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Picked this up recently for a snip from an excellent fleabayer in Japan:

 

post-80-0-31658500-1457205574_thumb.jpg

 

A fairly clean item from August 1968 with a good dial. Being a bit of a fan of Sportsmatics, I haven't come across this particular model before & wrongly thought at first that it had a cyclops crystal retro fitted. Further research showed this to be the original configuration, however the crystal was in fairly poor nick & appeared to have been polished a few times in the past. After some more detective work the part number was obtained & amazingly Cousins had one in stock:

 

post-80-0-18273600-1457206608_thumb.jpg

 

So far so good, although the rotor sounds a little rough (not uncommon on these). Lets see whats inside:

 

post-80-0-43477900-1457205578_thumb.jpg

 

Bit grubby with a scraping rotor, but the bearings seem OK, so the rotor gets bent upwards slightly - don't frown, it's what Seiko recommends!

 

Out of the case, dial & hands off, strip down the dial side. Note the broken setting lever spring, I have a donor movement from a previous project and will replace this:

 

post-80-0-88468600-1457205582_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-61565600-1457205587_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-06895900-1457205592_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-45987400-1457205596_thumb.jpg

 

Turn over & rotor off:

 

post-80-0-13575400-1457205601_thumb.jpg

 

Remove the winding gear:

 

post-80-0-62293800-1457205605_thumb.jpg

 

Strip down the above, a bit of wear on the magic lever but appears to work fine, clean lube & reassemble:

 

post-80-0-91219300-1457205612_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-61585400-1457206062_thumb.jpg

 

Onto the main stripdown:

 

post-80-0-85418800-1457206066_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-20739100-1457206071_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-53386600-1457206075_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-93160000-1457206079_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-37013400-1457206084_thumb.jpg

 

All in bits & cleaned:

 

post-80-0-12628800-1457206087.jpg

 

Lower Diashock dismantled, cleaned then reassembled:

 

post-80-0-83468700-1457206089.jpgpost-80-0-65186600-1457206092.jpg

 

Then it all goes back together:

 

post-80-0-65098900-1457206113_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-17995900-1457206118_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-05419300-1457206122_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-63800500-1457206129_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-56959400-1457206133_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-99103100-1457206175_thumb.jpg

 

On to the dial side, setting lever spring replaced:

 

post-80-0-17426700-1457206229_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-58108000-1457206234_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-22170400-1457206240_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-15017400-1457210051_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-18601500-1457206583_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-08179900-1457206587_thumb.jpg

 

Into the case, reattach winding gear, rotor  & caseback on:

 

post-80-0-32648300-1457206591_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-09512300-1457206596_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-19572200-1457206600_thumb.jpgpost-80-0-03835900-1457206604_thumb.jpg

 

The original crystal was used before the previous step to protect the hands, this is now removed the dial is given a final clean before putting the new crystal in place, which pushes on under finger pressure. The crystal is held firm by the bezel, which is a problem to fit as all of my dies are shallow & bevelled, unable to push the bezel down, so 2 pieces of 40mm waste water pipe are cut to suitable length, one piece is then fitted onto a stepped flat die, the other has a section removed and placed inside the first:

 

post-80-0-50002100-1457206611_thumb.jpg

 

Works a treat. Finally, with a new tan alligator strap fitted:

 

post-80-0-94329100-1457206614_thumb.jpg

 

It looks like the crown has been replaced with the wrong one in the dim & distant. Hopefully this will be rectified in due course.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thanks for posting an excellent walk through and great pics.

 

That is a really nice example too.

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Thanks for the kind comments all.

 

Jdm - timegrapher reading as requested:

 

post-80-0-62014100-1457261593.jpg

 

Taken dial down, there is a little variance on other positions & I will give it another look in a week or so once its bedded in. The original readings before service were: Rate +/-13 seconds, Amp 194, BE 1.2

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Thanks a bunch! 

 

Nice dial! Movement parts can often be scrounged; dials, hands, cases, not so much. 

 

My parts pile demonstrates this very well :-)

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Brilliant!  And so nicely photographed as well.  Oh how I wish my hands weren't so shaky as well as my confidence.  Looking at the pile of parts I would have no idea of the reassembly order.  This is where your craft and intelligence comes into play.  Bravo!

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  • 2 weeks later...

excellent tutorial! well done and easy to follow. that sportsmatic is a beauty. that is a great classic look with those beautiful dauphine hands. and these sportsmatics seem to have much larger indices than other seikos. maybe i'm imagining that  - but it seems so.

i've got three of them - and i think one more around here somewhere. mine are 6619's from 1964, 1967 and one i can't date. they're a nice dress watch and just the right size.

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Picked this up recently for a snip from an excellent fleabayer in Japan:

attachicon.gif01.jpg

A fairly clean item from August 1968 with a good dial. Being a bit of a fan of Sportsmatics, I haven't come across this particular model before & wrongly thought at first that it had a cyclops crystal retro fitted. Further research showed this to be the original configuration, however the crystal was in fairly poor nick & appeared to have been polished a few times in the past. After some more detective work the part number was obtained & amazingly Cousins had one in stock:

attachicon.gif37.jpg

So far so good, although the rotor sounds a little rough (not uncommon on these). Lets see whats inside:

attachicon.gif02.jpg

Bit grubby with a scraping rotor, but the bearings seem OK, so the rotor gets bent upwards slightly - don't frown, it's what Seiko recommends!

Out of the case, dial & hands off, strip down the dial side. Note the broken setting lever spring, I have a donor movement from a previous project and will replace this:

attachicon.gif03.jpgattachicon.gif04.jpgattachicon.gif05.jpgattachicon.gif06.jpg

Turn over & rotor off:

attachicon.gif07.jpg

Remove the winding gear:

attachicon.gif08.jpg

Strip down the above, a bit of wear on the magic lever but appears to work fine, clean lube & reassemble:

attachicon.gif10.jpgattachicon.gif11.jpg

Onto the main stripdown:

attachicon.gif13.jpgattachicon.gif14.jpgattachicon.gif15.jpgattachicon.gif16.jpgattachicon.gif17.jpg

All in bits & cleaned:

attachicon.gif18.jpg

Lower Diashock dismantled, cleaned then reassembled:

attachicon.gif19.jpgattachicon.gif20.jpg

Then it all goes back together:

attachicon.gif21.jpghttp://www.watchrepairtalk.com/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif22.jpghttp://www.watchrepairtalk.com/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif23.jpghttp://www.watchrepairtalk.com/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif24.jpghttp://www.watchrepairtalk.com/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif25.jpghttp://www.watchrepairtalk.com/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif26.jpg

On to the dial side, setting lever spring replaced:

http://www.watchrepairtalk.com/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif 27.jpghttp://www.watchrepairtalk.com/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif28.jpghttp://www.watchrepairtalk.com/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif29.jpghttp://www.watchrepairtalk.com/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif30.jpghttp://www.watchrepairtalk.com/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif31.jpghttp://www.watchrepairtalk.com/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif32.jpg

Into the case, reattach winding gear, rotor & caseback on:

http://www.watchrepairtalk.com/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif 33.jpghttp://www.watchrepairtalk.com/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif34.jpghttp://www.watchrepairtalk.com/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif35.jpghttp://www.watchrepairtalk.com/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif36.jpg

The original crystal was used before the previous step to protect the hands, this is now removed the dial is given a final clean before putting the new crystal in place, which pushes on under finger pressure. The crystal is held firm by the bezel, which is a problem to fit as all of my dies are shallow & bevelled, unable to push the bezel down, so 2 pieces of 40mm waste water pipe are cut to suitable length, one piece is then fitted onto a stepped flat die, the other has a section removed and placed inside the first:

http://www.watchrepairtalk.com/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif 38.jpg

Works a treat. Finally, with a new tan alligator strap fitted:

http://www.watchrepairtalk.com/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif 39.jpg

It looks like the crown has been replaced with the wrong one in the dim & distant. Hopefully this will be rectified in due course.

What a great job

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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