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GeorgeClarkson

Repairing My New Seiko 7T32-7C20 Flightmaster Chronograph

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First part of the disassembly, fixing and reassembly of my new Seiko 7T32-7C20 Flightmaster Chronograph that  recently bought as defect.

 

The damage was caused by trying to manually setting the date at around 11:30PM, when the watch usually starts to change the date automatically.

 

Enjoy the first part of the video.

 

 

 

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Excelllent, I am really enjoying this. Thanks for providing such a useful guide. I can't wait to see how it progresses.

I am uploading the second part, it is taking the whole day thanks to my crappy upload speeds (almost 4Gb on max 1MB upload... make your calculations on how much it takes...), and I will post the link as soon as it is done.

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That's a really nice looking watch! Jealous

I seem to be buying nice watches that need work but can never work up the nerve to open them up.

I've got 2 x 7s36 , 1 x 7t34 and 2 x miyota 3u62 that are vying for attention.

My main problem is i don't have a permanent workstation. Do you?

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Hell, if the video is 4Gig I would use half my monthly bandwidth allowance just to watch it, may pay to process the videos  through compression software.

Just adjust the resolution that you want from the cog wheel and let YT do the rest.

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Fantastic work. I am not envy .Have a 7T34 that i should dig into someday next week . And a Y187 that has a problem with a contact . But all the plastic. Ujk:)

Yeah. When I saw what was inside my 7t34 I immediately closed it up again. Also a ym62 that keeps stopping. Edited by ro63rto

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And finally, the third and last part of this series of videos... Pointing out how I repair the movement replacing the date driving wheel and how I repair the hour wheel, instead of replacing it.

 

Have fun!

 

Another great vid George by following your vid I have also successfully serviced/repaired a 7T32.PS when you strip how do you store the parts because I found the magnetising of parts from the stepping motors a problem.

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Hi CB, my take on it, or the way I do, I stick the motors to a piece of rodico and carefully find a separate container (maybe a compartment parts tray with lid) to store them and the other electronics (non washable) parts...each in its own compartment. Then I clean all the other parts accordingly. I don't worry much about magnetism since eventually they will all be exposed from the natural working on the watch. Some people demagnetize the parts they wash but I find it an iffy thing with the equipment at hand.

 

 

George, excellent videos, I have not words to thank you enough since I haven't yet worked on this movement but have one waiting for treatment! Big thanks to you for a wonderful job and post.

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

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Hi CB, my take on it, or the way I do, I stick the motors to a piece of rodico and carefully find a separate container (maybe a compartment parts tray with lid) to store them and the other electronics (non washable) parts...each in its own compartment. Then I clean all the other parts accordingly. I don't worry much about magnetism since eventually they will all be exposed from the natural working on the watch. Some people demagnetize the parts they wash but I find it an iffy thing with the equipment at hand.

 

 

George, excellent videos, I have not words to thank you enough since I haven't yet worked on this movement but have one waiting for treatment! Big thanks to you for a wonderful job and post.

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

Good idea Bob I will use next time for sure

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I also use some rodico. I never put the rotors in the washing machine, I just clean them with the rodico very carefully. As per where I store jem: I have a small compartment plastic box with lids: a small piece of rodico keeps them safe from broking if it falls on the ground.

Hi CB, my take on it, or the way I do, I stick the motors to a piece of rodico and carefully find a separate container (maybe a compartment parts tray with lid) to store them and the other electronics (non washable) parts...each in its own compartment. Then I clean all the other parts accordingly. I don't worry much about magnetism since eventually they will all be exposed from the natural working on the watch. Some people demagnetize the parts they wash but I find it an iffy thing with the equipment at hand.

George, excellent videos, I have not words to thank you enough since I haven't yet worked on this movement but have one waiting for treatment! Big thanks to you for a wonderful job and post.

Cheers,

Bob

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Just wonderful work, George!  Like others said...I'd much rather this stuff than watching a lot of the dross on tv these days.

 

You are obviously a methodical and gifted watchmaker.  I take my hat off to you, Sir!

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