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Which Watch Have You Got Coming In The Mail ? Show Us !!!


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5 hours ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

To me If that description if coming from someone with only a little watch knowledge and non technical, i guess the watch as a whole. Maybe should have said mid or low priced luxury. 

  I came accross the term " mid grade "  in a review of Seiko Lord matic .Mention was also made in the review that lord matic was about the best Seiko money could buy at time as Grand and king Seiko had stopped production due to quartz crisis. 

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, Nucejoe said:

So, besides precision gears/ pinions and  well polished pivots, whatelse outisde the escapement has to do with grade of a movement?

I have a link below to help you understand the 5600 series. notice at the very beginning of that discussion they call these high-end automatics. In other words even though these were mass-produced good for parts they were still produced with care. Then as you go up higher and higher hallway to the grand Seiko considerably more care was taken into making the watch. My understanding is basically the grand Seiko it have everything finished nicer they took more time on the balance wheel escapement etc. So basically anything in this series is going to be a good watch.

https://www.watch-wiki.net/doku.php?id=seiko_5600

http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&0&2uswk&Seiko_5619A

 

 

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1 hour ago, JohnR725 said:

I have a link below to help you understand the 5600 series. notice at the very beginning of that discussion they call these high-end automatics. In other words even though these were mass-produced good for parts they were still produced with care. Then as you go up higher and higher hallway to the grand Seiko considerably more care was taken into making the watch. My understanding is basically the grand Seiko it have everything finished nicer they took more time on the balance wheel escapement etc. So basically anything in this series is going to be a good watch.

https://www.watch-wiki.net/doku.php?id=seiko_5600

http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&0&2uswk&Seiko_5619A

 

 

Thank you John, very helpful as usual. 

 Didn't know my  lord matic 5619A is also called a duotime, thats its complication alright.   Gave the link to its pictures in my previous post in this same thread.

TG print out shows strong stable beats.

 A quesrion:     In the article, some variants were refered to as  "regulated"    I am just guessing its talking precise regulating,  for isochronism and all.  Are 5606 adjusted for positional variations. 

Thanks for taking the time to answer our questions.

 

 

 

 

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AsPurchased1-l1600.thumb.jpg.14b476a09e00d53fbad933866ad0968b.jpg

AsPurchased2-l1600.thumb.jpg.f740353a805fe5f6df2f6577e0eb4e38.jpg

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A slightly scruffy "La National" French cylinder pocket watch, with a nicely decorated main plate,  is on its way. Its missing its crown, stem and bow, but otherwise looks complete.

Hopefully with a little care and a clean and service,  it should run. I probably have something suitable to replace the missing parts with.

It came in 14 pence over the 404 club budget, but with inflation the way it is today, I think we may bend the rules and allow it in to the club.

 

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Not a watch, but a screw-head polishing tool. Offered on eBay as an auction, but the seemingly incomplete Lorch & Schmidt polishing set with a below mid-starting price got no bids, apart from my one in the last 5 seconds.

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However, only when enlarging the other sellers pictures, it seemed as if there were more collets hiding underneath the polishing disks and the polishing tool. This turned out to be the case.

After quite some TLC of the parts and the wooden box, the set turned out to be like this;

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IMG_2696.thumb.jpeg.b465e574c7cb1be532e5e45e3bacd6bb.jpeg

Less than 1/2 price than what these (be it fully complete) set are currently going for on eBay 🙂

Three parts, for polishing screw-thread-ends, are missing ...... I can easily live with that 😉

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Endeavor
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1 hour ago, Endeavor said:

Not a watch, but a screw-head polishing tool. Offered on eBay as an auction, but the seemingly incomplete Lorch & Schmidt polishing set with a below mid-starting price got no bids, apart from my one in the last 5 seconds.

420891221_Polishingset.thumb.jpg.f74956e4f353a2d2581aa86770a3a02c.jpg

However, only when enlarging the other sellers pictures, it seemed as if there were more collets hiding underneath the polishing disks and the polishing tool. This turned out to be the case.

After quite some TLC of the parts and the wooden box, the set turned out to be like this;

618580757_IMG_26952.thumb.jpeg.3f546f26a671a8f1cc1903d04d13648e.jpeg

IMG_2696.thumb.jpeg.b465e574c7cb1be532e5e45e3bacd6bb.jpeg

Less than 1/2 price than what these (be it fully complete) set are currently going for on eBay 🙂

Three parts, for polishing screw-thread-ends, are missing ...... I can live with that 😉

 

 

 

 

 

Cool nice tool said the actress to the bishop . Strangley enough i was watching the same one being used on a video yesterday. CS Watch repairs .

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Just bought myself an early birthday present. I've been eyeing Seiko 6139 series chronographs for a while, and finally enrolled in Mark's level 5 chronograph course.

Been keeping an eye on eBay and the plan was to piece one together from various watches and parts, but then this 1972 6139-6012 came up in nice shape, with the railroad bracelet, and as far as I can tell a reasonable price.

It'll be my first chronograph, so I'm looking forward to it!

image.thumb.png.99fddc1473749e145dbd2350e67524d7.pngimage.thumb.png.6fbe76550f7934ddbe94d6a0a353dbef.png

 

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3 hours ago, ManSkirtBrew said:

Just bought myself an early birthday present. I've been eyeing Seiko 6139 series chronographs for a while, and finally enrolled in Mark's level 5 chronograph course.

Been keeping an eye on eBay and the plan was to piece one together from various watches and parts, but then this 1972 6139-6012 came up in nice shape, with the railroad bracelet, and as far as I can tell a reasonable price.

It'll be my first chronograph, so I'm looking forward to it!

image.thumb.png.99fddc1473749e145dbd2350e67524d7.pngimage.thumb.png.6fbe76550f7934ddbe94d6a0a353dbef.png

 

Congrats on your incoming Seiko.  Those 6138's & 6139's are great to work on.  

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On 4/29/2023 at 3:05 PM, SpringMangler said:

Be interesting to know if it's the same pig of a bezel to remove as that on the Squale. Let us know how you get on.

The bezel popped right off only because it was poorly glued on for some unknown reason , the facet spring still around the rim. The bezel insert is in fact identical to my Smiths diver also is the watch case, the crystal and the bezel apart from the bezel is possibly aluminium its extremely light and the Smiths is brass. The insert is resin filled as we thought, i now have to figure out if they can both be removed and swapped as i prefer the smiths brass bezel ho keep original.

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I'm trying to learn the polishing of screw-heads, bluing of screws and bluing of hands.

Stumbled over this 48mm brand-less, key-wound, silver cased, Swiss anchor, Breguet hairspring, porcelain dial pocket-watch which seems to me a nice candidate for the time-consuming operation. The allegedly running movement doesn't seem to be tinkered to death and judging the winding-keyhole, not used "forever".  The hands are nicely delicate for bluing, so what possibly can go wrong? 😬

And it has, for a change, a doggy on the case-back 🐕

If anybody recognizes the movement (with such a long regulator-pin) or can put a date on the watch or its origin, I would love to hear .... 😉

 

TU.thumb.jpg.e06e083a714f12f5a3daf72056e784e5.jpg

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TU-4.thumb.jpg.921a9d6783a15a1a6030c34cdd373824.jpg

 

Edited by Endeavor
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2 hours ago, Endeavor said:

or can put a date on the watch or its origin

The silver hall marks may help to provide some idea about the date (latest date at least). Movement size and keyless works may match up with something in BestFit.

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1 hour ago, Marc said:

Movement size and keyless works may match up with something in BestFit.

For the movement size we have to wait, for the keyless a lot longer 😉

The only pictures I have so far are the sellers pictures and the (silver?) marks aren't very clear, at least to me;

TU-5.jpg.201d5b3d6589dec21a28259dc699108d.jpg

 

Edited by Endeavor
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3 hours ago, Endeavor said:

(silver?) marks aren't very clear, at least to me;

the problem with the hallmarks are that's not a British watch. the UK hallmarks are much nicer usually narrow things down to a specific year region etc. but this is a French/Swiss watch their hallmarks if existing at all tend to be very war or basically worthless.

4 hours ago, Marc said:

BestFit

the problem with bestfit is its time-limited. The two volume set is basically from the 60s to the mid-70s and doesn't really cover anything of vintage. There is some previous versions of the bestfit they go back farther and there is at least one other book I know of that is much farther back but unlikely for something like this there is the tiny like .1% chance that under the dial you might find something but probably the most to get is a serial number

but still it's a nice pretty silver case and the movement looks decent it looks like it hasn't been played with a lot. A lot of times will start to see modifications to the barrel assembly for instance that will become more understandable in the dial comes off as that should be a suspended barrel and a lot of times will modify it because well because a cam I guess just like sometimes are stopped works to be found in typically that gets misplaced. The consequences of vintage watches and lots of people playing with them over the years as opposed to just cleaning the watch and doing whatever is necessary they feel obligated to change or modify things but not necessarily in a good fashion

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  • 2 weeks later...
32 minutes ago, AndyHull said:

AsPurchased1-l1600.thumb.jpg.735de0dba971c69284a1dafdcacbc983.jpg

AsPurchasedRear1-l1600.thumb.jpg.a9f6abc793bc9e602562c346e04977a9.jpg

Possibly a fairly early USSR era Sekonda, and probably based on the Poljot 2408 If so, its from somewhere around 1956-1966

It comes with a free biohazard strap, so that is ... something. Needless to say it is a 404 club candidate.

Have you got a HAZMAT suit?  The first thing I do is cut of the strap and bin it.

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On 5/22/2023 at 3:33 PM, AndyHull said:

AsPurchased1-l1600.thumb.jpg.735de0dba971c69284a1dafdcacbc983.jpg

AsPurchasedRear1-l1600.thumb.jpg.a9f6abc793bc9e602562c346e04977a9.jpg

Possibly a fairly early USSR era Sekonda, and probably based on the Poljot 2408 If so, its from somewhere around 1956-1966

It comes with a free biohazard strap, so that is ... something. Needless to say it is a 404 club candidate.

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This one arrived, and looks promising. I couldn't remove the case back, which is actually a good sign, as it means that there is a high probability that nobody else has been tinkering inside it. I had to resort to supergluing a nut to it, as I was afraid that my case back openers were going to mar it.

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Once inside, it all looks pretty untouched, but somewhat filthy. The dial looks to be in good shape though, and a spot of lubrication and a wind proved that it will run. I'll strip it down, service it and post the results when I've finished

EDIT: I was wrong with my guess about what was likely to be in it, it contains a Bostok 2209.  A USSR produced 17 jewel movement from some time after 1955. Not what I thought it would be, nor was it a Pobeda (Победа) K-26 movement, the first watch movement ever in space, which would have been even more interesting.

Since it is branded Sekonda, it must be some time after 1966, but judging by the late 1950s design cues and the 16mm lug width, probably nearer 1966 than the 1970s. The original "Sekonda” watch brand was a company set up in 1966 by “Chasprom” the USSR watch industry central agency who’s remit was to sell their Russian made watches to a wider audience.

Edited by AndyHull
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With a bit of TLC and a thorough cleaning, it runs surprisingly well.

image.png.b0da48bda204c690a8c69efd056860bd.png

I can't guarantee the lift angle is correct, and those minor deviations in the trace were caused by me coughing.

I also added a small dial dot, as somehow one of the dial feet was missing the bottom third or so and the screw wouldn't catch. This was causing the dial to sit squint and pop up to touch the hands. I'm not sure if this is how it left the factory, but it is corrected now and everything is running smoothly.

I'll finish the regulation tomorrow once it has had a chance to settle down, but I think it is a pretty worthy addition to the 404 club
I've popped it on a burgundy leather strap and am wearing it as I type this. Time for bed now I think.

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Edited by AndyHull
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The seller from whom I bought the 1860-ish pocket watch (featured a few post back) had another interesting pocket-watch, which I decided to buy. I'm still working on the Le Phare 114CVV chronograph pocket-watch, but for €85, I didn't mind this similar looking, allegedly Valjoux (?), pocket watch. It seems in a little less condition than my Le Phare and the case is silver-plated instead of solid silver. It has a few (reset) flaws, but all is complete, seemingly original and in running condition. Another future project 😉

Valjoux-3.thumb.jpg.35ce77a8cf0b7a50049a34a818469fb7.jpg

Valjoux.thumb.jpg.aad298b285616e71fb442348e7cbe64d.jpg

 

 

 

Edited by Endeavor
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23 minutes ago, VWatchie said:

And amazing dial. Legible, sporty, precise.

I like the Le Phare too 🙂

I'm awaiting a new spring and may have to polish / shape the balance-staff pivots (never done that before; no pressure, just too much adrenaline 😬)

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Edited by Endeavor
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