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Which Watch Have You Got Coming In The Mail ? Show Us !!!

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33 minutes ago, oldhippy said:

I did.

OH, my apologies.

having gone back and re-read the article myself in a little more detail I can see the source of my confusion. It would seem that "gunmetal" is a bit of an ambiguous term, referring as it does to both a specific alloy, and also to a colour.  A bit like like "silver" which is both a metal and a colour.

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Ah... hence the confusion. "Gunmetal finish" on steel, as opposed to "gun metal", i.e. red brass, bronze, or cannon bronze.

Well, lets see what arrives in the post. If it is "gunmetal finish", then I'm going to have to figure out how to clean it up without loosing the black finish.

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32 minutes ago, Marc said:

OH, my apologies.

having gone back and re-read the article myself in a little more detail I can see the source of my confusion. It would seem that "gunmetal" is a bit of an ambiguous term, referring as it does to both a specific alloy, and also to a colour.  A bit like like "silver" which is both a metal and a colour.

Thats all right. There was no need to apologise. I good debate is what its all about.

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This is currently on the way to me. It's the first brand new watch that I've purchased in many, many years. No special occasion but the watch commemorates 1963, the year I graduated from high school. It is 42.5 mm in diameter which is right in the size range I prefer. It comes with either a black or silver bezel. I wanted the silver which was out of stock so I waited just a bit. If purchasing a new "anything" one should receive his heart's desire, not just what happens to be available. 

This one features a Miyota 6S20 movement with the smooth second hand. I've not personally seen that feature so I'm looking  forward to it although, the normal one second advancement of a quartz second hand is not an issue for me. According the the USPS tracking system, it is scheduled to arrive on Monday, 4/29. Can't wait to see it up close and personal.

Dan_Henry_1963_Pilot_Chronograph_Silver_1300x.png

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6 hours ago, AndyHull said:

Ah... hence the confusion. "Gunmetal finish" on steel, as opposed to "gun metal", i.e. red brass, bronze, or cannon bronze.

Well, lets see what arrives in the post. If it is "gunmetal finish", then I'm going to have to figure out how to clean it up without loosing the black finish.

@AndyHull assuming gunmetal finish your best bet may well be to polish it up to a bright steel finish and then re-blue it with a gun bluing kit. There are plenty of them about that are a lot simpler than the hot caustic process described in the link that I posted. Just google DIY gun bluing

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s-l1600.jpg

What can I say. I'm a sucker for a blue dial, and anything with that 70s vibe. This ticks both boxes. It also allegedly does tick, but stops.. and apparently has 17 jewels, but there were no pics of the movement, so another pot luck watch.

The winning bid was ... drumroll ... yes, you guessed it, exactly £4.04 - so no surprises there folks. :¬)

Edited by AndyHull

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On 5/4/2019 at 12:24 PM, AndyHull said:

s-l1600.jpg

More low cost fun. Just a little over three and a half quid each. My guess is, possible franken-dial, probably original and probably original. I spent more on two coffees and a couple of sticky buns in the supermarket cafe yesterday.

Nice! I love HMT.

That purple faced one, I have a 'vintage genuine' swiss Henri Sandoz with the exact same colour and applied indices and numerals haha. Slight patterning but otherwise much the same.

Good old Indian eBay.

Edited by m1ks

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Having worked my way through quite a lot of the last batch of oddities standing at the door of the "404 Club" clamoring to get in, I decided I hadn't suffered enough, so I popped a bid on this.

s-l1600.jpg

Advertised as a "Vintage Men’s TIMEX automatic day/ date, watch not working", and given its insanely scruffy appearance, and that dial, (and the resultant rock bottom price of course) how could I resist. It looks like a real gem in the rough.  I sense a lot of cleaning, oiling and polishing is likely to be required. I will of course keep you all posted as to its progress.

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AsPurchased2.jpg.e411205c73fdd4fa7ee537384d572877.jpg

I spotted this unloved 1940s or 1950s charmer, put my usual bid on and got it for considerably less, so I now own an "Ostalba 15 jewels - Swiss Model"

I have no idea what is inside, but the seller did claim it is "in working order". How could you not love this little gem?

Edited by AndyHull

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Many years ago, when the world was young, I picked up some dead "talking watches" in Tandy (the UK brand name of RadioShack).

I managed to get a couple of them to function, however their whereabouts is now a mystery. While trawling the bargain basement of ebay's watch lots, I have seen quite a number of talking watches, but they invariably go for a lot more than the 404 club rules allow.

s-l1600.jpg


However I saw a couple of these today, and put my pocket money bid on them fully expecting them to go for nearer £20 to £30. However I was wrong. I now have two talking watches heading my way, for the princely sum of £2.30 each +P&P

More novelty items for the collection.

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AsPurchased2.jpg.f41459be87d15811c436017b87680007.jpg

Dial looks original.

It should be the Yin to the Yang of the one I posted above. As a bonus, the seller claims it actually works, which is a relative rarity for prospective 404 club members.

I think I may swap out the steel strap though.

Edited by AndyHull

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On 5/20/2019 at 2:40 PM, AndyHull said:

AsPurchased2.jpg.e411205c73fdd4fa7ee537384d572877.jpg

I spotted this unloved 1940s or 1950s charmer, put my usual bid on and got it for considerably less, so I now own an "Ostalba 15 jewels - Swiss Model"

I have no idea what is inside, but the seller did claim it is "in working order". How could you not love this little gem?

Never seen a watch marked ''Swiss Model''

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A couple more HMTs. They look suspiciously franken, but at three quid each, and claimed to be working, I couldn't resist.

TwoJanatas2.thumb.jpg.428b2596392b011c208f07636a5dd561.jpg

I'm still waiting for a chance to go through the small collection of HMTs, and get them all back to a clean wearable, serviceable condition. I also have a few new faces in the Timex pile that need some TLC. I will of course post some pics when I get somewhere with them.

Edited by AndyHull

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.. and finally on my very slow slide in to horologicaly induced  bankruptcy..  six quid + p&p secured this lot.

s-l1600.jpg&key=53d3755b969d5ce851d4c48591e1c5a8974f825877a3db102b97769ac593d9dc

I've got a similar lensed visor but it came with more lenses. It has two slots to mount them simultaneously but I think that's a gimmick more than a useful feature.

I like the magnifying station, very useful. What power is the magnification?

 

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