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Which Watch Have You Got Coming In The Mail ? Show Us !!!


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Maybe this will be a donor, maybe I'll clean it up and add it to the collection.
Another USSR quartz. Hopefully a jewelled Luch 235X or a Poljot 2460.
At just over two quid,  and considering the seller claims it is running, I think it will prove an interesting purchase.

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I've been away for a while and thought I'd ease myself back into the watch world but... ended up jumping in with both feet for this one- I've wanted one of these for ages and figured the ma

Arrived today from Japan:  A lovely Hamilton Jazzmaster Automatic.  Nice clean lines, and is currently ticking away on the TimeGrapher:  +13 s/day, Amplitude: 258 deg., Beat Error: 0.4 ms. in face up.

Apologies for being uncouth- I've not put in enough effort in the community lately due to a relocation, health issues, children schooling from home, and just the general "2020 malaise" but I've got an

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3 hours ago, oldhippy said:

The last of the big spenders.😄

Hey I wouldn't want to rush  into things and blow a shed load of cash on just one watch. 😋
Admittedly I appear to be going slowly bankrupt in two quid increments... 🤨 but I'm having fun doing so.

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So, I've enjoyed assembling and modding ETA 6497/6498 and Seiko watches. I realized last night that I wanted to buy a true "beater" watch -- something that I'd like wearing, but that I'd trust to be waterproof and rugged enough to wear everywhere. My wife commented yesterday that I frequently don't wear a watch despite having a nice collection, and I realized that it was because I'm really worried about damaging my really nice watches. Even my most rugged watch, a Seiko SKX779 black monster, has a lot of sentimental value and I don't want to beat it up any more than I already have in the ten years I've owned it.

As I've never owned or worn one of the Vostok watches, I decided to buy one. The specific model I was most interested in wearing, a Vostok Amphibia SE with a fully lumed dial, was sold out. No worries there, as I realized I could build myself something equivalent or better -- taking advantage of all the cool variations of case sizes and shapes that are available.

Here's what I have coming in the mail:

My plan is to swap out the dial and hands first. I think that the all-black hands will probably look best, but I'm super curious about the quality of the "heat blued" steel hands. I've been learning how to heat blue steel myself, and I'm dying to know what a $6 set of heat blued hands from Vostok are like. I'm a tiny bit suspicious of them; given the premium charged by other manufacturers for real heat blued steel, $6 is a huge bargain. For the all black hands, I'm very tempted to pull out the lume and see how they look as "skeleton" hands.

I haven't settled on whether I'll keep the stock chromed-brass bezel, or whether I'll like the SS bezel with a Seiko insert instead. I'm not looking at a super fancy sapphire or ceramic bezel insert, but want something that matches the overall aesthetic of the watch (with its industrial-finish steel and thick acrylic crystal).

In retrospect, I probably shouldn't have bought the US-made upgraded stainless steel bezel until I become 100% convinced that the chrome-plated brass Vostok bezels aren't what I want. Since they're readily available used for just a few bucks each, it would have been smarter for me to have just tried a couple of those options first. Adding the SS bezel (and buying a Seiko bezel insert) will push this watch out of cool-but-cheap-enough-to-beat-up sweet spot I'm looking for. Also, if I had just purchased the watch, dial, heat-blued hands, and mesh bracelet, I would have come right in at a total cost of $100. As purchased last night, I spent $150. With one of the fancier Seiko bezel inserts, this climbs to $200. 😕

The base watch:

Vostok_Amphibian_090662.jpg.6ab9ba2caab8e93a86cdb3e9f45e2272.jpg

The fully-lumed dial glowing and under normal light:

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The heat-blued steel hands and the black hands I'm thinking about skeletonizing:

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My mom handed me this Gubelin “Ball of Light” from the ‘20s and asked if I could do anything with it. It’s a manual wind 17-jewel movement that started up immediately when I wound it, so I’m not inclined to do anything with it other than find a necklace or charm bracelet to pair with it for my wife.

Kind of cool looking, though.439C61CA-3140-41B2-A255-3101F66071BF.thumb.jpeg.ecf1f0321289a34aeabac70fc6eff69a.jpeg

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Very nice. The dial is perfect, and the lens like case back is in excellent condition too.

It has obviously been well cared for. 

A silver, or even white gold, medium weight chain would go well with it.

I wonder what it was originally attached to. It may well have been on a brooch or pin. Often these were very ornate and inlaid with precious stones.

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This little example comes on a rose gold 14kt pin brooch, with a few rubies and a diamond, and a rather hefty price tag considering its diminutive size.

Perhaps a visit to your local craftsman jeweller might inspire you to marry it up with something of your wife's choosing. 

If the mechanism hasn't been serviced recently, then it might be worth getting that done, so that it has a chance of lasting another 100 years.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Whilst cleaning out my father in laws attic ready for a new roof my wife found this little Siro Oris watch. The hair spring is broken and the balance staff pivots are broken on first quick look and not sure what else has gone but some hope it winds and the hands move. 

 

6AFB4924-00BB-4EB3-9889-112A02E1987F.jpeg

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AsPurchased-l1600.thumb.jpg.cecbf113034c615cb040a415e056c430.jpg

A Texas Instruments TI 401 LED watch in slightly rough but original condition.

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I blew the budget (again) on this one, by a whopping sixteen pence.

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I pushed the boat out a little on this one, as I had recently been watching a couple of videos about the chip that powers this, and other similar vintage TI module based watches.

Obviously for this low price, the thing doesn't probably work, but I'm fairly confident that I should be able to remedy that.

You may find these two videos interesting.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CeXYZKg5jdo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KdLnEOwTO6E

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If you wanted one of these back in 1976 it would have set you back $24.95 or to look at it another way $24.95 in 1976 is equal to $115.52 in 2020.


The top of the line model with the chrome plated case and steel band, which is what we have here was $44.95 which is around $208.13 in today's beer tokens.

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A few years later and LED watches had vanished, and LCD watches from Hong Kong were being given away for free when you filled up your car at the local filling station.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I picked this orphaned pocket watch mechanism up for a quid.

I really grabbed it for the hands, as the hairspring looks to be too far gone to fix.

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Intriguingly the name on the dial suggests that it is from New Zealand.

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The mechanism is obviously Swiss of course.

I do have a small pile of pocket watch hair springs, so perhaps I might take a crack at getting it going. I'm not sure what I would do with it if I succeed, maybe look for a suitable case, or maybe see if I can do something interesting with acrylic .

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34 minutes ago, Marc said:

Defeatist!!!!!!   🤣🤣🤣

Hmmm... I'll reserve judgement on the hairspring till it arrives, I may be able to do something with it... floss my teeth perhaps.

All joking aside,  I have spent long enough flogging dead horse hairsprings to tend to admit defeat when the thing is no longer in one continuous piece. Whether I will be up to the task of replacing it, and more importantly replacing it with something that actually works, is another matter.

However with the long dark months of winter slowly closing in, and with a second lock down looking almost inevitable, I may be crazy enough or bored enough to try. We are also assuming that the balance staff is complete, if not, the chances of finding one of those is pretty remote, so I might have to make one of those too.....

<sarcasm>After all, I have a book that tells me how to do it, how hard can it be? </sarcasm>

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@AndyHull I jest of course....

I admire your optimism and enthusiasm in even contemplating such a hair spring. I would go so far as to suggest that the two halves may be successfully reunited using a granny knot with no noticeable detrimental impact on its current performance. 🤣🤣

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3 hours ago, Marc said:

@AndyHull I jest of course....

I admire your optimism and enthusiasm in even contemplating such a hair spring. I would go so far as to suggest that the two halves may be successfully reunited using a granny knot with no noticeable detrimental impact on its current performance. 🤣🤣

Now I know you are joking. Everyone knows only a reef knot would work.

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Apologies for being uncouth- I've not put in enough effort in the community lately due to a relocation, health issues, children schooling from home, and just the general "2020 malaise" but I've got another beauty in hand that I'd like to share.

This is a Jardur Bezelmeter (model 960), probably from around 1945, which I picked up from eBay this week.  It cost a pretty penny too but it's a piece that's been on my wishlist for a long time and this particular one ticked all the boxes.

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The Bezelmeter has an interesting history- from what I have read it was marketed primarily to aviators and military personal during the 1940's and according to legend was commonly sold through military post exchanges. Collectors seem to believe that the watches often served active service members. Advertisements from the period make it clear they were marketed as tool for the adventurous professional.

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Introduced more than a decade before the Navitimer and Breguet Type 20, it was certainly a watch ahead of it's time. It's quite a large watch at 38mm and exhibits all of those traits we usually associate with a Pilot Watch- luminous hands, blackened dial, tachymetre scale, and of course the chronograph function.  Specialty features include the countdown bezel and 180 degree scale on the dial (useful to pilots executing a standard rate of turn). The movement is shock protected, the case is stainless steel and water resistant with a screw down caseback and cork seals; all fairly unusual features for a watch of this age.

All the Bezelmeters I've seen house either a Valjoux 71 or 72 movement inside.  I prefer the former as the earlier Valjoux 71 Bezelmeters had slightly larger cases and sported the more elegant cathedral hands. The movement in my Bezelmeter needs a service (naturally) as it only runs for a few seconds. I can't wait to get to it but unfortunately I've already got a line of other watches to clear out first.

 

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3 hours ago, RyMoeller said:

Apologies for being uncouth- I've not put in enough effort in the community lately due to a relocation, health issues, children schooling from home, and just the general "2020 malaise" but I've got another beauty in hand that I'd like to share.

This is a Jardur Bezelmeter (model 960), probably from around 1945, which I picked up from eBay this week.  It cost a pretty penny too but it's a piece that's been on my wishlist for a long time and this particular one ticked all the boxes.

IMG_2695.thumb.jpeg.2ba23ed03d29c7d1f75cea4e8024ca1d.jpeg

The Bezelmeter has an interesting history- from what I have read it was marketed primarily to aviators and military personal during the 1940's and according to legend was commonly sold through military post exchanges. Collectors seem to believe that the watches often served active service members. Advertisements from the period make it clear they were marketed as tool for the adventurous professional.

694430741_1944JardurAdvert.thumb.png.616f8e2d013f16486bb16372aba8ce37.png

1755532805_JardurAdvert.thumb.png.2c74930fb7b5bdf270be7468f835d5cf.png

Introduced more than a decade before the Navitimer and Breguet Type 20, it was certainly a watch ahead of it's time. It's quite a large watch at 38mm and exhibits all of those traits we usually associate with a Pilot Watch- luminous hands, blackened dial, tachymetre scale, and of course the chronograph function.  Specialty features include the countdown bezel and 180 degree scale on the dial (useful to pilots executing a standard rate of turn). The movement is shock protected, the case is stainless steel and water resistant with a screw down caseback and cork seals; all fairly unusual features for a watch of this age.

All the Bezelmeters I've seen house either a Valjoux 71 or 72 movement inside.  I prefer the former as the earlier Valjoux 71 Bezelmeters had slightly larger cases and sported the more elegant cathedral hands. The movement in my Bezelmeter needs a service (naturally) as it only runs for a few seconds. I can't wait to get to it but unfortunately I've already got a line of other watches to clear out first.

 

That is something else!😍 Love to see it again after you have done the restoration....😎

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AsPurchasedFront-l1600.thumb.jpg.7af3136b511711c8ac7dcc93f16d20e9.jpg

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Another novelty watch for the 404 club. A Fero with a rather odd exhibition case back, and palm tree motif dial.

Listed as not working, and with the regulator suspiciously pushed to one side, I suspect this may need a bit of attention. I may also need to resort to some serious metal bashing skills to sort out that 1960s stainless band too, although that is almost certainly not original.

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