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Which Watch Have You Got Coming In The Mail ? Show Us !!!


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I've been away for a while and thought I'd ease myself back into the watch world but... ended up jumping in with both feet for this one- I've wanted one of these for ages and figured the ma

Just picked up this lot.  Got it mostly for the jump minute quartz, the phone dial electric and the blue nebula electric. Finally qualify for @AndyHull 's 404 club.

KING TURTLE !!!    

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I am now a couple of quid the poorer, but the proud(?!) owner of this two for the price of one. Who can resist a 25 jewel automatic for less than the price of a sparkplug for the lawnmower.

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Apparently it/they might need a battery.

I've got a few of those in the shed, maybe something like this might do the trick

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The ladies watch is a "Delvina", and you might think that name would be easy to research but "Delvina"  only narrows it down to three possible origins. Time will tell. Who knows, when we take a peek inside we might get more clues.

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I am a little worried by the implication that it/they might be "cogs parts steampunk" as there are no pictures of "the works", just external views, but there is no evidence of anybody doing anything too destructive  to them apart from abusing the Delvina with a little superglue.

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On the plus side, if it turns out to be just a bunch of steampunk cogs, at least I'll still be able to cut the grass.

Edited by AndyHull
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35 minutes ago, AndyHull said:

image.png.8871ca51982afdc72877969070695198.png

I am now a couple of quid the poorer, but the proud(?!) owner of this two for the price of one. Who can resist a 25 jewel automatic for less than the price of a sparkplug for the lawnmower.

s-l1600.jpg

image.thumb.png.f7ca305ce96a5cab5ad89dc14696bf7c.png

Apparently it/they might need a battery.

I've got a few of those in the shed, maybe something like this might do the trick

s-l1600.jpg

The ladies watch is a "Delvina", and you might think that name would be easy to research but "Delvina"  only narrows it down to three possible origins. Time will tell. Who knows, when we take a peek inside we might get more clues.

image.png.daab7a7c9ace2ff134080fb81bcde2cf.png

I am a little worried by the implication that it/they might be "cogs parts steampunk" as there are no pictures of "the works", just external views, but there is no evidence of anybody doing anything too destructive  to them apart from abusing the Delvina with a little superglue.

s-l1600.jpg

On the plus side, if it turns out to be just a bunch of steampunk cogs, at least I'll still be able to cut the grass.

The Limit almost certainly will contain an AS2066 movement Andy....

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Currently waiting on the postal service to deliver a Benrus CE13 (ETA930) movement. The cost for the complete movement was much less than international dial can refurb one. I bought it for a watch on which the dial has yellowed over time. .

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/BENRUS-MODEL-CE13-CE-13-POINTER-17J-MOVEMENT-FOR-PARTS-OR-REPAIRS-RUNNING/324231185754?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649

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An Ingersoll Sealion with a terrible condition hair puller strap is coming to join the 404 club.

"Described simply as not working", so no battery required for this one. :D

 

Edited by AndyHull
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16 minutes ago, AndyHull said:

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An Ingersoll Sealion with a terrible condition hair puller strap is coming to join the 404 club.

"Described simply as not working", so no battery required for this one. :D

 

EB88** I presume, got bunch of parts to most variants. Will trade for glass of milk in beautiful, beautiful, beautiful Scotland.

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3 minutes ago, Nucejoe said:

EB88** I presume, got bunch of parts to most variants. Will trade for glass of milk in beautiful, beautiful, beautiful Scotland.

highland-cow-and-calf.jpg

The only problem is, you may have to fetch the milk yourself, Morag doesn't look to be in a co-operative mood.

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3 minutes ago, AndyHull said:

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The only problem is, you may have to fetch the milk yourself, Morag doesn't look to be in a co-operative mood.

:o  On second thoughts, I like beer too.

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Now that is a bonny beastie , they always look fiercer than they are,  but with a calf stick to the Beer could be a lot less painfull. I dont think you would get much milk in the bucket. !!!!!

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5 minutes ago, watchweasol said:

Now that is a bonny beastie , they always look fiercer than they are,  but with a calf stick to the Beer could be a lot less painfull. I dont think you would get much milk in the bucket. !!!!!

Highland cattle are generally pretty docile, but as you said, if she has a calf with her, I wouldn't arm wrestle her for the beer, she would almost certainly win.

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At a quid fifty each plus a couple of quid postage, I thought this lot might be interesting.

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The three LEDs are possibly Macys or Rotary, from the design.

The seller mentions Riva, Macy's and Zetron, so since the Riva and Zetron are the two ladies LCDs, then logically at least one of the LEDs is probably  a "Macy's", and since I can't resist a bargain vintage LED watch, I put a low bid on, not expecting to win.

There was only one other bidder, but apparently they were even more of a miserable old skinflint than I am. :P

Lets hope the dreaded battery fungus hasn't done for those LED modules.

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So, here's kind of a fun story:

A few weeks ago, I purchased a Gruen Verithin Pentagon pocket watch in filled white gold. It had a distinctive engraving inside of its caseback that read "Leland S. Offer, Los Angeles, Calif." Based on the serial number of its case and movement, and with the assistance of some Gruen experts, I was able to date this watch to 1922 or 1923. Because I was curious and like a good story, I researched the original owner, one Leland Stanford Offer, who was a successful salesman living near Los Angeles at the time he purchased the Pentagon. Using Ancestry.com, I was able to learn the names of Leland S. Offer's living descendants. With the help of Google and some paid people searches, I was able to get in contact with Leland S. Offer's living grandson and one of Leland S. Offer's living great-grandnephews. I mailed the great-grandnephew Leland S. Offer's Gruen Pentagon, and the current plan is for the great-grandnephew and I to surprise Leland S. Offer's living grandson with his grandfather's watch on a Zoom videoconference later this week. I was happy to reunite this family with the pocketwatch free of charge, but the great-grandnephew insisted on covering my expenses. Because of this, I've been on the lookout for a nice replacement Gruen Pentagon pocketwatch.

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I had been lusting after a 14k or filled green gold Pentagon, but earlier today I found a really nice solid 14k white gold specimen that was nicely engraved and featured pretty black enamel painting on its case. Here's the replacement Gruen Pentagon that is on its way to me now:

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I plan on polishing and heat bluing the hands from this watch. I would like to overhaul it myself, but I don't know if I have the skills to attempt this yet. I've been practicing on Seiko NH36A movements and the experience has, to say the least, been humbling. There's something about the super thin and delicate layers of aluminum in the NH36A movement that I can't help but destroy.

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13 hours ago, dpn said:

I've been practicing on Seiko NH36A movements and the experience has, to say the least, been humbling. There's something about the super thin and delicate layers of aluminum in the NH36A movement that I can't help but destroy.

You mean the calendar plates? These are not aluminum, neither particularly thin.

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7 hours ago, jdm said:

You mean the calendar plates? These are not aluminum, neither particularly thin.

Indeed ... and it's humbling to hear that they're neither aluminum nor particularly thin. I've damaged three movements trying to swap out an aftermarket day and date ring onto an NH36A. I have a devil of a time aligning the plates and getting the four screws back in without deforming the plates. My best effort has resulted in day- and date-wheels that turn correctly when the crown is in the second position, but which don't advance correctly when I'm advancing the hands in the third crown position. I am planning on disassembling that movement and reassembling it again over the weekend.

I haven't given up. I do have a neurological condition that makes me shaky and reduced the feeling in my dominant hand's fingertips, so maybe I'm not the best candidate to learn watch repair. I haven't given up yet, though. Practice practice practice!

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3 hours ago, dpn said:

I have a devil of a time aligning the plates and getting the four screws back in without deforming the plates

Try some technique. First, by all means bring work to shoulder height, forearms or at least elbow must rest on the bench.

For this particular task the plates have one or two small locating posts. Bring plates holes into one and place a pegwood stick over it, hold with left hand. Right hand places the screw to the nearest hole with tweezers and then gets the driver, which must be dressed right for a Seiko screw, that means the tip has a noticeable flat edge. It must wedge to the slot top edges. If the screw wobbles side to side with the driver in the slot that means the nose must be flattened more, With one screw in place the opposite one should follow easily. Do not locate the day finger into the wheel teetch until all screws are in but still lose.

I tried to describe more practical tips in my  walk-throughout for the 6R15 which is practically the same mov't

 

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Great advice, thank you! I used the NH36A walkthrough, but shamefully admit that I hadn't read your 6R15 walkthrough first.

You nailed the problem I was experiencing with my screwdrivers -- I didn't realize that they needed to be dressed for Seiko screws, and they wobbled like crazy and made screwing them in very difficult.

Lesson learned, and thank you for the tip. I'm chagrined, but grateful for the advice.

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21 hours ago, jdm said:

For this particular task the plates have one or two small locating posts. Bring plates holes into one and place a pegwood stick over it, hold with left hand. Right hand places the screw to the nearest hole with tweezers and then gets the driver, which must be dressed right for a Seiko screw, that means the tip has a noticeable flat edge.

@jdm, thanks for the tip. Flattening the screwdriver blade *really* helped. I assembled and disassembled one of my NH36A movements four times last night, and it was significantly easier going with a better screwdriver blade.

There's still something going with how everything is aligning -- I'm going to reread your guide and try again with a fresh movement. I suspect that things might be slightly misaligned when I screw everything down, even though the brass pegs are correctly slipping through both plates. I've been screwing down each screw completely, rather than waiting for all four to be loosely in place, and I've also been putting the date finger into the wheel before screwing down everything. I hope that'll help.

For everyone else: I'll stop replying to this thread, and will post separately if I'm still having problems. I apologize for partially hijacking this thread. 

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On 8/14/2020 at 8:56 PM, dpn said:

My best effort has resulted in day- and date-wheels that turn correctly when the crown is in the second position, but which don't advance correctly when I'm advancing the hands in the third crown position.

Topic now hijacked, make sure that before fitting the outer plate you advance time until the black day/date wheel has its finger resting on the inner plate, toward the center. That aligns and stabilize the whole shebang before proceeding further.

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 @jdm Thanks a ton for the advice and encouragement. I suspect that the movements I've been practicing with are well and truly messed up now, as I can't get the (fragile) arm on the "Date Disk Guard" to engage with the "Day-Date Corrector Wheel". I'm referring to the extraordinarily fragile part highlighted in yellow here:

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Blunting my screwdriver was a game changer; it's far easier for me to get those screws in and out now. I've disassembled and reassembled the day/date components of the movements half a dozen times since you clued me in on the potential problem with my screwdriver.

I am wondering if my aftermarket luminescent date and day wheels are the problem, as everything appears functional if I use the stock date and date wheels.

Regardless, I have two more fresh NH36A movements on their way. Armed with a better screwdriver and a good deal more practice than I've had before, I hope I'll be able to complete this work this time.

@ all: Apologies again for hijacking this thread. I think that I've gotten it back on topic by mentioning that I have two more NH36A movements on their way in to me!

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7 hours ago, dpn said:

I can't get the (fragile) arm on the "Date Disk Guard" to engage with the "Day-Date Corrector Wheel". I'm referring to the extraordinarily fragile part highlighted in yellow here:

Sorry that you are having problems, but please be aware that in general that jumper is not fragile at all, rather is of good design and easy to handle. Leave it above the date ring until all screws are in, then position and tighten. It never engages the corrector wheel.

7 hours ago, dpn said:

I am wondering if my aftermarket luminescent date and day wheels are the problem, as everything appears functional if I use the stock date and date wheels.

Date ring and day disk. Measure and compare accurately.

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Waiting for the following $20 "beauty" to restore... I already worry about those two mainsprings (one for the escapement and one for the alarm). "SU" for Soviet Union, so likely before its dissolution, December 26, 1991.

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PoljotAlarm3.thumb.jpg.06b306d57a73822546b742a778542471.jpg

 

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Cool!  An alarm watch!   I like alarm watches.  Does it strike against some kind of miniature gong?  Or is there some kind of bell that covers over the movement?  How does it work?

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