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jdm

Have A Laugh Tools

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Here's another one. Chinese hand setting knock-off set, not even that cheap.

They did not match any color marked on the box, there is no flat head, and two or three were of the same size. Fortunately that was easy to fix by re-drilling to measure and labeling.

post-1542-0-37541500-1448915588_thumb.jp

Edited by jdm

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The description of this spring bar tool makes me laugh.

 

I think this tool is a waste of time and money.

 

For sure Mr B.F. does not let business get in the way of opinions!

Edited by jdm

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I'm getting good at finding these. Pin vice from the shop that claims to be your uncle's sons.

 

  • Double Ended: Ø0 to Ø1.20mm & Ø1.50mm to Ø2.50mm

Which is not really true, the actual pin sizes with which you're left on your own are 1.50 - 1.70mm.

Inexactness in deficiency :)

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I bought this pin remover tool on Aliexpress for $2.35. The idea of a screwed base to adjust to the pin height is good, problem is that at some point it hits. Also, the threaded shaft is lose and wobbles, total width is way exaggerated, and the spare pins are all 0.8mm which can or can't be the right size.

P7263171.JPG

Still I can't complain as the same thing on Amazon is 9 euros or so.

All in all, the plastic $0.64 ones from the same seller are probably better :) 

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When you guys are sad or bored, please have a look at Aliexpress.

From a sapphire crystal listing (which In Chinese English are called "sapphirine chips"

Please leave a message of which size you want, or it will be sent randomly

 

 

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Resurrecting an old thread. Elsewhere I've posted about my bench polisher, which is perfectly executed with insulated wiring, spare motor brushes, and precise concentricity. What I find laughable is  the 12/17mm stamped wrench, supposedly for the chuck arbor - which has a 14mm cut. Better nothing at all!

 

DSC_0030.JPG

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Good topic...

I think mine has to be the first tool I ever bought for the hobby, the ever present on ebay cheap Indian screwdriver set.

Here is me trying to be a serious watch repair person with my loupe in place and my new screwdriver poised above the movement...then the tip falls out into the movement...the horror, the horror...well after I got over the initial shock I started laughing so hard the wife came in to see what was so funny in the world of watch repair.

I am a mechanic by trade and know the value of quality tools. Why I ever bought them is still a mystery to me.

The cheap brass set screw would not stay tight for love nor money and finally stripped out all together. No matter what one did, every time I picked one up the tip would fall out.

I also deal with a lot of Chinese assembly instructions. The good ones are kept in a folder for when I'm feeling down and need a pick me up.:D

 

 

 

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Bought these two Chinese G-clamp sets at the chain store, but on different days. Same shelf, same label, same price - not even that cheap. Mediocre quality, but that I can accept. What is surprising is that at one factory, 3" is about 75mm, but at the other only a bit more than 60mm :huh:

DSC_0050.JPG

Edited by jdm

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2 hours ago, jdm said:

Clamp from the above after 2 months straightening a cabinet door. Looks like is made of recycled rust and dross.

DSC_0069.JPG

I think you will find the Chinese instruction manual specifically says, not suitable for use on cabinets.

不适合在任何地方使用

 

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A machinist mentor told me it was a standard prank in the shop to ask to borrow the new guy's micrometer, then clamp up parts with a dummy mic (some old junk mic), holler to the guy that his "clamp" was hard to tighten- from across the room- then when he freaks toss it to him in a way he can never catch it.

All that said I've seen some c-clamps that were so sorry they should have paid people to take them, and others that could probably serve as decent micrometers. I'm not anti China-cheap stuff, sometimes you find gems for practically free. But usually you get what you pay for.

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More surprisingly usable than having a laugh but.....

EBay 'why not, if it's really bad it's so cheap it doesn't matter' order, 99p incl delivery, (quickly enough to be UK based as the seller claimed though these often aren't which doesn't matter to me when buying cheap things). Battery for the led included and even decent sturdy box with it.

20x loupe on spectacle frame with led.

For very brief close inspection of teeth, jewels, pivots etc certainly good enough I previously used a 14x for this and my 5x on a wire loop for general work but the convenience of slipping the 5x up and the spectacle design on is worth it.

You have to wonder how they can do it.

 

Screenshot_2019-10-03-00-19-54.png

Edited by m1ks

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Funny, but - you cannot pay incredibly low prices and expect professionally executed  tools. Not fair IMHO.

Some of the cheap tools can be improved easily with little effort to get a still cheap but usable tool.
E.g. change the brass screws against steel ones for few cents in the above mentioned Indian screwdrivers. You can even use swiss blades. BTW loose screws and dropping blades will annoy you with swiss/french screwdrivers, too!

For years now I use a cheap Indian sliding pin tong for holding certain barrel arbors. Initially a ridiculous tool, after machining the suitable opening it serves its purpose perfectly.

Frank

 

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On ‎11‎/‎30‎/‎2015 at 12:21 PM, ramrod said:

everyone knows that red handles are superfine. it's in all of the watchmaking books. all of them.

:D

 some men are color blind.     that could get you a spot in the artillery.   vin

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On ‎7‎/‎26‎/‎2016 at 7:11 AM, jdm said:

I bought this pin remover tool on Aliexpress for $2.35. The idea of a screwed base to adjust to the pin height is good, problem is that at some point it hits. Also, the threaded shaft is lose and wobbles, total width is way exaggerated, and the spare pins are all 0.8mm which can or can't be the right size.

P7263171.JPG

Still I can't complain as the same thing on Amazon is 9 euros or so.

All in all, the plastic $0.64 ones from the same seller are probably better :) 

   i have one of these.  it is metal ,  not plastic AND ; it's still not worth  a shite !  vin

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On ‎4‎/‎7‎/‎2019 at 11:45 AM, jdm said:

Resurrecting an old thread. Elsewhere I've posted about my bench polisher, which is perfectly executed with insulated wiring, spare motor brushes, and precise concentricity. What I find laughable is  the 12/17mm stamped wrench, supposedly for the chuck arbor - which has a 14mm cut. Better nothing at all!

 

DSC_0030.JPG

   that wrench has a " special use".   i have had to grind a good wrench down to that size !  (some air grinders, for X)

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