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Until last week I knew nothing about clock repairs, but have spent the last 50 years in engineering and generally fixing anything else I can lay my hands on !

Then two clocks, both with Westminster chimes were given to me to see if I could do anything with them, so after reading lots of articles, buying an ebook, and watching some very good YouTube clips, I am now of course an expert 🫣.  One is now working again after resetting the chime barrel more by luck than judgement, and the other is in an awful lot of bits awaiting some tools and bushes, to hopefully sort out the oval holes in that as well. 

I'm surprised how interesting I have been working on these clocks, and as I have always fancied doing some sort of model engineering, this might be the ideal time to get a small engineers lathe.

I look forward to reading the items on the forum and I hope I don't ask too many stupid questions, please forgive me if I do 🙂.

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Thank you for your introduction and welcome to this friendly forum.

We all look forward to your contributions and continued involvement. 

Look on ebay for a Unimat 3 lathe I have two one with the milling attachment and I have loads of accessories. I'm retired from watch clock making but clock making is what I concentrated on. The unimat 3 will handle up to Longcase clock barrels and the center wheel. So unless you are going to service Turret clocks the Unimat will do all you want.  

 

Edited by oldhippy
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1 hour ago, oldhippy said:

Thank you for your introduction and welcome to this friendly forum.

We all look forward to your contributions and continued involvement. 

Look on ebay for a Unimat 3 lathe I have two one with the milling attachment and I have loads of accessories. I'm retired from watch clock making but clock making is what I concentrated on. The unimat 3 will handle up to Longcase clock barrels and the center wheel. So unless you are going to service Turret clocks the Unimat will do all you want.  

 

Thanks I'll have a look. In the past I have considered a Myford Super Seven but at the time I didnt have the room for one.

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The Myford is a hell of a lot bigger than the Unimat. It really depends what you are going to use it for. If you are thinking about just standard work I tell tell you you will want to get into more complicated work and you might find what you started out with is not good enough.  

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