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20 minutes ago, VWatchie said:

would hit the "Buy it now" button! The seller determines the price. However, if the price was a million dollars I would politely and respectfully let the seller know the price I'm willing to pay (provided I'm interested in the item). If the seller then decided to go ballistic over my offer it is not my responsibility.

I have to agree, a buyer will only pay the maximum amount that he thinks the item is worth to him. I get this all the time when i go to car boots, i ask the price and if it's above what i want to pay then i either state what i want to pay or say thanks and walk away. Quite a few take the ump and tell me "its worth every penny and more"  of their price, my reply is the same every time   " it might be, but not to me ". Its that simple, its what it's worth to you and not anyone else. If it comes in for less then thats a bonus for you. I dont think a little bit of education passed onto a genuine seller is doing any harm, if hes upset then its probably because hes been caught out or been wildy disillusioned. Either way that isn't your problem. 

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20 minutes ago, AndyHull said:

Don't get me started on the so called "free market" and all its pseudo-scientific mumbo jumbo.

Free markets are nearly extincted. Perhaps eBay is one of the last few left, but most of what we "officially" buy is at rigged prices in a rigged "money"-system.

Perhaps in the not too far future they have printed so much of these confetti $ / £ / € that you have to pay indeed a million "confetti-notes" for a Rolex  🫢

Edited by Endeavor
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17 minutes ago, AndyHull said:

We won't be able to breath the air or drink the water, but we will be rich I tell you RICH!! 🤑

Yes, we're supposed to worry about CO2 emissions (making the planet greener and more prosperous), but not to worry one bit about pollution, nuclear weapons, and WWIII. It's a sad world.

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27 minutes ago, AndyHull said:

Don't worry that we are poisoning the planet, killing ourselves with corn syrup and cheep ass food and

No no no Andy you've got it all wrong mate, clearly nothing at all to do with money. It was ideal American solution/experiment to make everyone's fast paced life easier and more convenient. No point eating healthily, what's the point of that, no nothing at all to do with money 🤨. I heard something once it went like this  # why are there no windows in food processing plants ?  So that nobody can see what's going on ! # 🤣 thats stuck in my head ever since i heard it . "THE BIG FAT LIE"

Edited by Neverenoughwatches
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3 minutes ago, Endeavor said:

Perhaps in the not too far future they have printed so much of these confetti $ / £ / € that you have to pay indeed a million confetti-notes for a Rolex  🫢

Yep, nothing but a system to keep the common man enslaved.

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I have to confess that Harry Enfield was much more amusing than my fellow Scot, and so called father of economics, Adam Smith.

Smith did delve much deeper into what drives the wheels of trade than most people imagine.

Its a pretty tough and stodgy read for modern tastes though.

Most people have heard of his work "The wealth of nations." (strictly speaking its actually called "An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations", but that is a bit of a mouth full), but far fewer have encountered "The Theory of Moral Sentiments".

Smith's "Wealth of Nations" is much misquoted and rarely read by those who profess to follow the capitalist religion, but such is the way of blind faith followers. Few if any of these religiose zealots will have even heard of , nor be interested in his theory of moral sentiments, despite its in depth analysis of the very behaviours they indulge in. 

image.png.8d936637467e79518cca306acf00c724.png

I doubt that he realised when he penned his works that they would be so often used to attempt to vindicate the baser inclinations of the greedy some 265 years later.

If you are ever in the area, you might like to take a trip down the Royal Mile in Edinburgh to the Cannon Gate church, and ponder a while with him, the changes that have taken place since his time. As to actually reading his works... I suspect you may need to stock up on the extra strong coffee before you dive in, but they are, arguably worth the effort.

"As we have no immediate experience of what other men feel, we can form no idea of the manner in which they are affected, but by conceiving what we ourselves should feel in the like situation. Though our brother is on the rack, as long as we ourselves are at our ease, our senses will never inform us of what he suffers. They never did, and never can, carry us beyond our own person, and it is by the imagination only that we can form any conception of what are his sensations. Neither can that faculty help us to this any other way, than by representing to us what would be our own, if we were in his case. It is the impressions of our own senses only, not those of his, which our imaginations copy. By the imagination, we place ourselves in his situation ..."

Or as the great man never said, or even implied... "greed is good".. 

Rant over... normal service has been resumed.

Edited by AndyHull
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2 hours ago, AndyHull said:

take a trip down the Royal Mile in Edinburgh to the Cannon Gate church,

Been quite a few times at the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, but didn't know ....... 😕

Edited by Endeavor
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11 minutes ago, AndyHull said:

I have to confess that Harry Enfield was much more amusing than my fellow Scot, and so called father of economics, Adam Smith.

Smith did delve much deeper into what drives the wheels of trade than most people imagine.

Its a pretty tough and stodgy read for modern tastes though.

Most people have heard of his work "The wealth of nations." (strictly speaking its actually called "An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations", but that is a bit of a mouth full), but far fewer have encountered "The Theory of Moral Sentiments".

Smith is much misquoted and rarely read by those who profess to follow the capitalist religion, but such is the way of blind faith followers.

image.png.8d936637467e79518cca306acf00c724.png

I doubt that he realised when he penned his works that they would be so often used to attempt to vindicate the baser inclinations of the greedy some 265 years later.

If you are ever in the area, you might like to take a trip down the Royal Mile in Edinburgh to the Cannon Gate church, and ponder a while with him, the changes that have taken place since his time. As to actually reading his works... I suspect you may need to stock up in the extra strong coffee before you dive in, but they are, arguably worth the effort.

"As we have no immediate experience of what other men feel, we can form no idea of the manner in which they are affected, but by conceiving what we ourselves should feel in the like situation. Though our brother is on the rack, as long as we ourselves are at our ease, our senses will never inform us of what he suffers. They never did, and never can, carry us beyond our own person, and it is by the imagination only that we can form any conception of what are his sensations. Neither can that faculty help us to this any other way, than by representing to us what would be our own, if we were in his case. It is the impressions of our own senses only, not those of his, which our imaginations copy. By the imagination, we place ourselves in his situation ..."

Or as the great man never said, or even implied... "greed is good".. 

Rant over... normal service has been resumed.

Walk a mile in someone else's shoes and you still wont fully understand them.

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2 minutes ago, Endeavor said:

Been quite a few times in at the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, but didn't know ....... 😕

When you have communed with the great man, don't forget to take a wander round the corner and across a few streets to Chambers Street to look in on my favourite clock in the National Museum of Scotland. They also do a nice cup of coffee there to warm you up after sitting a while with Mr Smith.

3 minutes ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

Walk a mile in someone else's shoes and you still wont fully understand them.

True, but at least by that point he has probably stopped chasing you to try to recover his shoes.

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2 minutes ago, AndyHull said:

When you have communed with the great man, don't forget to take a wander round the corner and across a few streets to Chambers Street to look in on my favourite clock in the National Museum of Scotland. They also do a nice cup of coffee there to warm you up after sitting a while with Mr Smith.

True, but at least by that point he has probably stopped chasing you to try to recover his shoes.

One way to get a bargain without going through ebay, I'd find someone with size 10 furlined boots, its bloody cold outside.

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3 hours ago, AndyHull said:

Those boots and knees do look a little familiar.

I know that statue on that little market-place, but never read what it said ...... I must have been more occupied with looking at the surroundings what "nature" had to offer 😂

Edited by Endeavor
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  • 2 weeks later...
On 2/28/2024 at 4:16 PM, Endeavor said:

If we were to stop interfering with other peoples life, there would be a whole lot less wars.

I have been thinking about this sentence since it was posted and have come to the conclusion it is more true than it first appears. Looking at history it's packed full of examples.

It's not what we say that matters, it is what we do and its results.

Never forget that the evilest deeds have always been done with the best of intentions.

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