Jump to content

AS 554 from 1930


Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, Razz said:

Actually kind of rough, maybe munute wheel pinion problems? Is the 2.73mm canion oinion which seems rarer and not availble on Cousins UK. The seconds hand works and suprising nice amplitude but don't know the lift angle and BE this one says 17 j but is a pin pallet as well. Cap jewels on the escape and drive train pivots. Interestingly in has both water proof and shock resistant on the caseback and dial. Puts this around 1969 or '70?DSCN58362.thumb.JPG.4cb8d81d7a2a236641bf8c1e603ac89e.JPGDSCN58422.thumb.JPG.c00dbab8048bb2c6bf67d0ffc8f62d28.JPG

The double bezel that works independently is cool has the pi symbol on each. Wonder if it can be used like a slide rule ir something...

Nice interesting diver Razz, i have a sheffield dress watch, different movement altogether. Could be a wrong motion works part, how does the setting feel before fitting the cannon pinion, clutch and intermediate wheel meshing ok ?  The less traditional setting design could be suspect, the second wheel has a slip clutch assembly, that most likely needs looking at.

2 hours ago, Razz said:

Actually kind of rough, maybe munute wheel pinion problems? Is the 2.73mm canion oinion which seems rarer and not availble on Cousins UK. The seconds hand works and suprising nice amplitude but don't know the lift angle and BE this one says 17 j but is a pin pallet as well. Cap jewels on the escape and drive train pivots. Interestingly in has both water proof and shock resistant on the caseback and dial. Puts this around 1969 or '70?DSCN58362.thumb.JPG.4cb8d81d7a2a236641bf8c1e603ac89e.JPGDSCN58422.thumb.JPG.c00dbab8048bb2c6bf67d0ffc8f62d28.JPG

The double bezel that works independently is cool has the pi symbol on each. Wonder if it can be used like a slide rule ir something...

LA is 42 ° Razz

17 minutes ago, RichardHarris123 said:

The pallet fork should really be called a lever, English lever, Swiss lever etc but most people including myself call it a pallet fork.

Tbh i  much prefer to call the complete unit the lever, then use the seperate names for all of its components. Such as guard pin, fork, fork horns, fork slot, lever arm, pallets , pallet arms, pallet slot, pallet stones. I suppose pallet fork is the combination of the two opposite ends that make up the lever, its also called the anchor which is descriptive of its appearance. 

40 minutes ago, VWatchie said:

I'm not sure what kind of movement this is, but I'm curious to know if you're using the word "lever" as a synonym for "pallet fork"?

Its a pretty basic 1930s  swiss lever movement H and yes Nev was meaning the pallet fork.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

30 minutes ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

i  much prefer to call the complete unit the lever

I agree, I call it a pallet fork for two reasons, it was the name used when I started watch repair both in written documents and on videos and calling it a lever causes confusion as seen. 

Plenty of other examples where there's more than one name. What do you call the opposite side of the movement from the dial side?  I've heard you call it the watch makers side. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, RichardHarris123 said:

I agree, I call it a pallet fork for two reasons, it was the name used when I started watch repair both in written documents and on videos and calling it a lever causes confusion as seen. 

Plenty of other examples where there's more than one name. What do you call the opposite side of the movement from the dial side?  I've heard you call it the watch makers side. 

My overall preference is to use traditional names and terms, that became my habit when i was taught joinery by old boy chippies 2 generations older than me , that had their time in the 40's. But what i often do is adjust the names and terms i use according to who I'm talking with. Sometimes i will say trainside and occasionally watchmaker's side. I try to find a balance between accommodating other folk ( there's no point speaking a foreign language to someone who doesn't understand it ) and using a name that appears to me to be more relevant as to its use or description. But using the name lever can be quite confusing,  some watches might have parts that are also levers, release levers, which in effect is what the pallet fork is, an escapement release lever. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, RichardHarris123 said:

I've heard you call it the watch makers side.

I've also heard it called the "top side" and the dial side the "bottom side", which should make any non-repairer very confused.

There are many examples and sometimes it comes down to personal preference. Personally, I like to say "dial train" whereas most other people would use the term "motion works".

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think this is pretty typical when you have something that crosses many regional and international borders. @Neverenoughwatches yes Rich, that is the common way, learning from our teachers, however terms used in Yorkshire could easily be a lot different for tools, techniques or methods different from Scotland or Somerset. My (long winded) point is it all depends on where you first picked up the terms, if from books American watch terminology differs from English terminology and to a degree Swiss terminology. That also seems to extend to watchmaking schools. Confusing at first starting out but like anything else you get used to it. This will be why our long term members attach a glossary to new users introducing themselves as beginning their journey. 
 

Tom

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, tomh207 said:

I think this is pretty typical when you have something that crosses many regional and international borders. @Neverenoughwatches yes Rich, that is the common way, learning from our teachers, however terms used in Yorkshire could easily be a lot different for tools, techniques or methods different from Scotland or Somerset. My (long winded) point is it all depends on where you first picked up the terms, if from books American watch terminology differs from English terminology and to a degree Swiss terminology. That also seems to extend to watchmaking schools. Confusing at first starting out but like anything else you get used to it. This will be why our long term members attach a glossary to new users introducing themselves as beginning their journey. 
 

Tom

You definitely pick up different names from different people of all ages from everywhere. Like learning different dialects of the same language. Its all part of the learning curve of any trade. 

1 hour ago, VWatchie said:

I've also heard it called the "top side" and the dial side the "bottom side", which should make any non-repairer very confused.

There are many examples and sometimes it comes down to personal preference. Personally, I like to say "dial train" whereas most other people would use the term "motion works".

Both those two terms describe to me perfectly that they are one and the same. After a couple of years of knowledge you can figure out what is being talked about. There are times that i get caught out with something i haven't encountered before. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, RichardHarris123 said:

The pallet fork should really be called a lever, English lever, Swiss lever etc but most people including myself call it a pallet fork.

Yes, this is what I exactly ment to write in answer.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Finally got around to having a dry run with the original roller that came with the watch and what should be a genuine nos staff that does match the movement caliber specified as an AS 554.  No go at all , the bottom of the big table sits directly on top of the fork. So it seems the complete balance assembly has been modified to fit a staff that was made to fit inbetween the plate and cock. Unless I've gone wrong somewhere and identified the movement wrong and the staff should be a different one. Problem is the original staff broke in two and is very poorly made making it difficult to measure.  Looks like this will have to be shelved until another 554 comes  my way, or if anyone has one and can verify the staff measurements for me. Now i think about it I do have the stem, i could use that it check the caliber 🤔

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • 0.3mm hole drilled which was surprisingly easy and went a whole lot better than i expected considering i did it free hand with a carbide bit in a small pin vice,and no breakages. I only have some 0.34mm and 0.5mm blue steel so my plan is to open up the hole to 0.5mm and reduce the pivot down to size to fit the plate bearing before fitting it in the arbor.  I'm not entirely sure on the hole depth, my head is tell me 3x the hole diameter . I dont have a 0.4 mm Nev or i would have.  Turn a new arbor 😲😵 me thinks you overestimate my ability Nev 😅
    • I have never understood how a square can be produced on a lathe, seen plenty of videos but not sure how it works. How do you make the huck on the arbor?
    • personally from my point of view I would say no. This is where more than just an evaluation on one side is needed somebody needs to take the watch apart and see what else is bad. Like it's possible the pivots for those wheels are missing which we really can't see in the picture right now. Then that does appear to be rather heavy rust on the balance bridge and I wonder where else were going to find that rust? just a little clarification here are you new to working on an Omega 1010 watches or are you new to working on watches altogether? The reason I need the clarification is that if you're new to watches and even if this watch came to you for free repairing it is going to be extremely expensive as Omega watches tend to be very expensive for spare parts. you never can tell about watch companies what part numbers we can find.of course the biggest problem of all is this is Omega watch part of Swatch group and Swatch group doesn't like us so they're not going to sell you the spare parts unless you have a swatch account. then if you have to find aftermarket Omega parts because they know that nobody can get those parts that tend to be really expensive is why repairing Omega watches is going to be very expensive. According to the parts list found at the link below there were some jewels available I'm not sure if they're the right one because I haven't quite figured out which jewels those are yet. I'm also attaching a PDF of the parts list to help you identify whatever it is you're going to need it looks like some of the plates were once available although getting a new plates will be problematic it might actually be better to find a scrap watch to steel parts from.   http://cgi.julesborel.com/cgi-bin/matcgi2?ref=OME_1010       Omega 1010_complet_2236.pdf
    • You mean all that stuff about aliens and black helicopters isn't true?
    • Thanks yes it’s nice to make tools and equipment if we can , I needed a fixed steady for my Pultra I had one for a Pultra with 70mm centre  and I was going to cut it down to be able to use it on my P type ( 50mm centre) but it seemed a shame to butcher such a rare item so made one. Dell
×
×
  • Create New...