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Challenges rewinding Seiko mainsprings


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Just curious, do others have challenges with Seiko mainsprings using Bergeron winder?

I’ve hosed like a 1/2 dozen of these damn things — always the same problem—getting that reverse bridle into the winding spool. Doesn’t help that Seiko also uses a very low height mainsprings (under 1.0mm) that don’t fit the #7 winder very well.

or is it just my lack of experience and/or missing some sort of trick of the trade on this one?

thanks—jay (levine98) 

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There is quite a big discussion on this very subject on this forum about halfway through the topic below, but the short version is that it appears to be a combination of reverse bridal and shallow barrel design which makes Seiko mainsprings more difficult to wind, even for the experts, many of whom choose to hand wind instead of using mainspring winders.

 

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6 hours ago, Waggy said:

There is quite a big discussion on this very subject on this forum about halfway through the topic below, but the short version is that it appears to be a combination of reverse bridal and shallow barrel design which makes Seiko mainsprings more difficult to wind, even for the experts, many of whom choose to hand wind instead of using mainspring winders.

 

Thanks for pointing me to this—I’ll check it out. 

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