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Help removing broken pusher tubes Omega 176.005


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Hello all. I inherited a Omega 176.005 with a badly dented and pitted case. I got a hold of a replacement case that is in better cosmetic condition as well as a new set of pushers.

The problem is I can't remove the old pushers from the case as they have been broken off and the splines are completely gone. I bought a screw in pusher fitting & removing tool but without any splines there is no way for it to grab and unscrew them.

Plies were too big to grab them and I couldn't get enough leverage with tweezers. See the pictures below. Any ideas on how to get these off? Any help is appreciated.

case 1.jpg

case 2.jpg

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You first have to determine whether the tubes are screw-in or friction fitted types. Look inside the case to see if there are any signs that the hole is threaded.

If the tube is a screw-in type, wedging in a slightly tapered rod and turning it might work. WD40 and heat will help loosen it. Worse case scenario, you might have to carefully drill/ream/file until the remnant of the tube disintegrates. If the threads end up getting damaged, then you would have to thread the hole for the next bigger size pusher tube.

If the tube is a friction fitted type, there are specialized tools to push it out.

But spending money for an expensive tool for a one-time job doesn't make sense. Consider sending the watch to a competent watchmaker. 

https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/pusher-pendant-tube-fitting-removing-press-horotec-swiss

 

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3 hours ago, RichardHarris123 said:

Try heating the case to break any threadlocker, followed by soaking in Coca-Cola for 24 hrs. You can buy micro screw extractors or shape an old screwdriver into a  wedge shape. 

 

2 hours ago, HectorLooi said:

You first have to determine whether the tubes are screw-in or friction fitted types. Look inside the case to see if there are any signs that the hole is threaded.

If the tube is a screw-in type, wedging in a slightly tapered rod and turning it might work. WD40 and heat will help loosen it. Worse case scenario, you might have to carefully drill/ream/file until the remnant of the tube disintegrates. If the threads end up getting damaged, then you would have to thread the hole for the next bigger size pusher tube.

If the tube is a friction fitted type, there are specialized tools to push it out.

But spending money for an expensive tool for a one-time job doesn't make sense. Consider sending the watch to a competent watchmaker. 

https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/pusher-pendant-tube-fitting-removing-press-horotec-swiss

 

Thanks for the replies. The tubes are definitely the screw-in type. Any recommendation on the best way to apply the heat? Should I stick the whole thing in the oven or do I want to apply it locally at the tubes? Thanks.

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I usually use a butane microtorch for heating seized screws.

Depending on the type of threadlocker used, sometimes the parts need to be heated to 150°C before the bond is weakened. 

Before applying heat, make sure that any heat sensitive parts are removed, like orings, gaskets, etc.

Although it might have a right hand thread, it usually helps to turn the part in both directions to break the adhesive bonds.

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invest in some cutting broaches, they have a slight taper and the 5 sides are sharp and will dig into the side of the pusher, remove in a counter clockwise direction in case the pusher is threaded, if not threaded it does not matter which direction, I use a heat gun to heat stubborn pieces that are locktited in, if still will not come out the broach can cut the majority out so a threaded tap can be used to clean and straighten the original threads in the case head, one could make an easy 4-sided tapered broach from a proper sized length of steel.....

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