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new to watch repairing


ShambaBasher

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Hello all

I'm new to watch repair, but have the basic kit from my father.

Just wondering what would be a good movement to start on? I was thinking of buying a SW-200 or ETA no date and just start from there (please don't say pocket watch lol).

Are there instruction manuals a bit like putting together a Lego model? Or are such guides not available. I really worry about using the wrong screws.

Best Wishes

Richard

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4 hours ago, ShambaBasher said:

Hello all

I'm new to watch repair, but have the basic kit from my father.

Just wondering what would be a good movement to start on? I was thinking of buying a SW-200 or ETA no date and just start from there (please don't say pocket watch lol).

Are there instruction manuals a bit like putting together a Lego model? Or are such guides not available. I really worry about using the wrong screws.

Best Wishes

Richard

What's wrong with starting on a pocket watch?  However, I would clarify that recommendation to be one that is a modern movement (vintage wrist watches or pocket watches can come with too many gremlins).  Something easy to find parts, in case you lose or damage one, and one that you can find videos on assembly/disassembly.  I started with a SeaGull ST3600 (ETA 6497 clone) and turned it into a pocket watch, but you can also turn them into a large wrist watch.  I learned lots from servicing that movement.

Edited by gpraceman
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16 hours ago, RichardHarris123 said:

I far as I know there aren't instructions as you described

19 hours ago, ShambaBasher said:

there instruction manuals a bit like putting together a Lego model?

At one time Swatch group did have something which was step-by-step walk-through of several watches. Unfortunately as it involves moving graphics they made use of flash which is been phased out. But otherwise was a step-by-step of disassembling and reassembling four different movements. For instance this is a sample of one page of a pocket watch.

image.png.8de3d38e909e30bf3cf19e89819aa871.png

15 hours ago, watchweasol said:

There are service sheets available but none on the Chinese, and Swatch Group products

Swatch group is interesting in that some stuff is available at least some of the modern ETA quartz and mechanical technical sheets. Vintage technical is interesting because often it was only scanned for parts availability and often times will be missing servicing information if it even existed at all. Watch companies have the silly notion that anyone working on their watch should know what they're doing so a lot of times service information was not available.

19 hours ago, ShambaBasher said:

SW-200 or ETA

I have the links below are you can find some technical information for the watches you seek.

https://sellita.ch/index.php/en/movements

https://shopb2b.eta.ch/en/

 

 

 

 

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