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Gingerr6

Basic Cleaning.

Question

Afternoon Guys,

 

I have just purchased and Tissot with a 2824-2 that needs a refresh.

 

I have repaired 2 of the same movement before but this will be my 1st full strip and re build.

 

What's the best way of cleaning the parts either by hand or ultrasonic?

 

do I need specialist chemicals? bear in mind I wont be doing this all the time :)

 

list of parts would be appreciated.

 

Many thanks

James.

 

post-1206-0-56116000-1439987291_thumb.jp

 

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I think the movement is an ETA 2836-2. If so the strip down and drawings can be found on the ETA web site. It looks like the movement has had water ingress so a complete strip down,clean reassembly & lubrication will be required.

Agree with CB that acctually looks like a ETA 2836-2 movement . Tissot only has 21 jewels and has a different rotor .

Edited by rogart63

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Hi Ginger, the 2.5x magnification should be fine for stripping and assembly, although being old and blind I tend to use a 3.5x. The 8" means you will have roughly 8" of space to work between the visor and movement.

If you are just starting off, I would recommend using Ronsol or Zippo lighter fuel and a small brush to clean the parts. An ultrasonic tank would be a lot better, but I would hold back on that and proprietary cleaners until you find out how keen you are going to be.

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Hi Ginger, the 2.5x magnification should be fine for stripping and assembly, although being old and blind I tend to use a 3.5x. The 8" means you will have roughly 8" of space to work between the visor and movement.

If you are just starting off, I would recommend using Ronsol or Zippo lighter fuel and a small brush to clean the parts. An ultrasonic tank would be a lot better, but I would hold back on that and proprietary cleaners until you find out how keen you are going to be.

Excellent. I guessed as much on the 8".

Good tip about the lighter fluid :) thanks.

Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk

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Hi ginger, I recently cleaned a movement that had similar signs of water ingress & I found this video Mark did very useful. Although it's of a 7750 movement,  he does show &  discuss a couple of methods he used to clean the particularly bad areas. I think it's round 14mins in https://youtu.be/BesSK67Mzms. 

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