Jump to content

Polishing Setup


DJT2

Recommended Posts

Hi guys, I've been looking for ages at getting a Polishing machine & I've just come across this. I'm probably opening a can of worms by giving the link as I'm sure others may jump all over it. So please, please don't bid. However, I'd love your opinions. http://pages.ebay.com/link/?nav=item.view&id=252034854605&globalID=EBAY-GB&alt=web

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's the real deal if you are going to be doing heavy duty case refinishing on a regular basis. You could do a lot of good work, and damage, very quickly with it.

I certainly won't be bidding, as I do all my case refinishing by hand, and just the occasional touch with a Dremel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A Polishing machine is nice, and works well on really gold watch cases and jewellery. For refinshing watches i would recommend getting a Foredom TX300 Jewelers Kit, http://www.ebay.com/itm/Foredom-TX-300-Hi-Torque-Flex-Shaft-Kit-/330883038562?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4d0a2a7d62

 

With this you can do nearly anything you would ever need for refinshing or repairing watch cases, incudling adding satin finsh, sanding out any straches, drilling, riveting watch pins and hand polishing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's the real deal if you are going to be doing heavy duty case refinishing on a regular basis. You could do a lot of good work, and damage, very quickly with it.

I certainly won't be bidding, as I do all my case refinishing by hand, and just the occasional touch with a Dremel.

+1

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's the real deal if you are going to be doing heavy duty case refinishing on a regular basis. You could do a lot of good work, and damage, very quickly with it.

I certainly won't be bidding, as I do all my case refinishing by hand, and just the occasional touch with a Dremel.

+1

Hi Geo & Frenchie, I realise you guys apprehension to recommending such an industrial commercial machine to a complete novice like myself. After all, I have never ever touched a Polishing wheel in my life. I understand if not used correctly I could cause some real damage, but on the flipside.. With practice, practice, practice & alot of respect for the machinery. Intime (over yrs) it would become a real kick **BLEEP** skill to learn.

Although, I'd love learn all the aspects of watch horology. Including, lathes & machining parts etc. But I have to be realistic. I live in nice apartment over looking the Estuary in Lytham (no garage) . My kind wife has given me a mancave room & she would not appreciate me turning it into a metal shop. Therefore, I'll have to curtail my dreams/ aspirations & fucus on the areas of this hobby that would give me the most satisfaction & overtime I could become quite proficient at. Hey, it may take me the rest of my life to produce a professionally refinished watch case. But at least I'll die happy & trying

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's a nice bit of kit, but you would have to be a serious user for it to make sense. £270 is a lot for a machine you may only use infrequently.

 

The options suggested by the other guys makes more sense to me and it wouldn't hog as much space in your man cave.

 

This is my setup for machine polishing, and I rarely use the big one for watches.

 

post-1141-0-88543700-1437789472_thumb.jp

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The polishing machine I had was similar to this old boy. As long as you have the right compounds and polishing brushes and you understand what there for and you take your time (you don't need to use it flat out) you should be alright. There are a few polishing tutorials on youtube that you might like to look at. This is just my opinion but what you have your eye on I think it is far too big for watch case work.  

post-1154-0-78679800-1437809602.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's a nice bit of kit, but you would have to be a serious user for it to make sense. £270 is a lot for a machine you may only use infrequently.

The options suggested by the other guys makes more sense to me and it wouldn't hog as much space in your man cave.

This is my setup for machine polishing, and I rarely use the big one for watches.

attachicon.gifWPE.JPG

The polishing machine I had was similar to this old boy. As long as you have the right compounds and polishing brushes and you understand what there for and you take your time (you don't need to use it flat out) you should be alright. There are a few polishing tutorials on youtube that you might like to look at. This is just my opinion but what you have your eye on I think it is far too big for watch case work.

Thanks guys for comments, I realise it's a bit of overkill. My problem is that without a garage or outdoor space I'm stuck to converting a room in our apartment for my man cave. Therefore, what ever I chose needs to have its own ventilation system.

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Welcome to the forum, enjoy
    • https://ranfft.org/caliber/6487-Helvetia-800 Two springs listed for the calibre, one is 0.095 and the other is 0.1
    • Hi. Once silver soldered and cleaned up it shouldn’t need a brace across the joint. If all else fails I have a few movements with the braces on.  A PM if you need one.
    • The watch is automatic, but hte automatic module on the picture is missing. All the problems that You are afraid of actually are not problems at all. The only thing that You must take care is when pressing the seconds hand in place. You must then support the movement by the stone of the 4th wheel (in the center of the movement) in order to prevent shifting of the stone.
    • See, what has happen is a normal consequece of the reducing the hammer size and changing it's shape by the removing metal from it. But here the hammer is adjustable and just adjustment is needed to correct, and this is what You have done. There is a rule for the adjustment and it is that the hammer must lay firmly on the seconds counter heart and there should be a litle free play in the same time of the minutes counter heart/hammer which alows counter movement of about 0.5 min on the small dial hand (+/- 0.25). Of course, there is no way to make one hammer to delay from the other, as they are one single part. What has changed too is the slope of the hammer head and thus the orientation of the heart has changed, and thus the switching finger position. This led to need of the finger position correction. The rule here is that switching of the minute counter has to start when the seconds counter hand is on '59'. Of course, the seconds hand must be positioned as so the resetting is at '0' exactly. If switching is earlier than 59, there will be no problem, but it will be wrong as reading can be not correct. If the switching starts later, the problems that You described can happen.
×
×
  • Create New...