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Starting A New Tradition In American Watchmaking...


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I hope this doesn't come off as a sales pitch for RGM Watches, but I find myself very proud of the fact that the USA, once again, has a legitimate Company making high grade watches. Since the doors closed on the Hamilton Factory in 1969 (the year I was born), there has not been a single company that has produced an in-house movement here is the United States.

 

I believe that, to us as American Watch Addicts, we have a special attachment to this company. And, I'm sure the UK Watch Addicts have the same feelings about watchmakers like R.W. Smith, who incidentally, I believe will go down as one of the Greatest watchmakers of all time! 

 

I just wanted to share a couple of short videos that give the story behind RGM's momentous achievement of producing a great timepiece, the Pennsylvania Tourbillon.  

 

Part 1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4PrBLgjO0gU

 

Part 2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxrrHKTyxts

 

 

Regards,

Don

 

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Great news to here that good quality watches are going to be produced. Let's hope that the new stuff I is on par with the old Illinois & Hamilton quality.

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The American watch industry as was, had a past to be proud of, think of all the great names, Elgin,Waltham,Hamilton,Bulova, just for starters, I'm sure this new company will carry on the tradition. The only problem, being a poor person, will be the price, but then it's not aimed at my sector of the market. I hope they succeed.

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Yes, their prices are why I don't have one today. If I'm not mistaken, there least exspensive watch is around $2000, their tourbillon is $95K!

 

I do lover their in house movement, the 801 caliber. it is probably one of the most beautiful  movements being produced today...

 

RGM_MODEL_801P_B.jpg

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Yes, their prices are why I don't have one today. If I'm not mistaken, there least exspensive watch is around $2000, their tourbillon is $95K!

 

I do lover their in house movement, the 801 caliber. it is probably one of the most beautiful  movements being produced today...

 

RGM_MODEL_801P_B.jpg

 

That is very nice! And yes - it would be a crime to hide it away in a case without a display back.

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Also, I doubt these guys were the first to do it, but this is where I got the idea of using the Hamilton 10s movements for wristwatch conversions. They also produce some extraordinary engine turned dials as well.

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They are beautiful but am I the only one that thinks the blue screws are colored and not blued from heat treatment? True heat treatment makes a deeper color and some imperfections. They look great either way. Maybe that was their intention?

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I really admire RGM for doing this. I think with them and Roger Smith in the UK two of the most famous horological centres  are coming alive again and that can only be a good thing. Along with Seiko in Japan it is great to have other places of quality other that Switzerland.

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I would wager that they are heat treated as is customary in this level of finish...but I don't know for sure!

 

As far as color, it can be controlled if you have precise control of the heat levels. If you've every blued a piece of metal, you can watch it go through multiple colors and in that, varying degrees of blue.

 

As far as imperfections go, if the piece is perfectly polished and cleaned, you can get an amazing Blue finish with really no visible flaws. But, it is NOT easy! Believe me as I've spent the better part of a day re bluing a set of screws for an antique pocket watch. 

 

Speaking of Blued screws, that is the one thing about this movement that I really don't care for. Traditionally, blued screws were usually done on lower grade finishes and typically paired with guilded  movements. Polished screws were usually used with nickel finished or "white" movements...

 

Don

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Speaking of Blued screws, that is the one thing about this movement that I really don't care for. Traditionally, blued screws were usually done on lower grade finishes and typically paired with guilded  movements. Polished screws were usually used with nickel finished or "white" movements...

 

Don

 

The Blued Screws look "Right" with this finish!

 

post-90-0-71406000-1395323589_thumb.jpg

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