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DouglasSkinner

Get Rid Of Superficial Rust

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Several of the watches I've encountered have what I would call superficial rust.  I can remove some of it by scrubbing but, quite often, there's a residual stain.  Any technique/preparation/compound that is readily available that can be used to remove stains without, say, removing the plating?  Particularly encounter problems with screw heads and parts of the keyless works (set mechanism).

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    • By MrRoundel
      Greetings folks. I've been working on watches as a hobby for about 20 years now.  I started out on pocket watches and have never cleaned a clock. In fact, I had a great cleaning machine, with the big jars, and a few other clock tools, that I gave away to an aspiring clock guy over at the Tascione site. But I digress...
      Nearly 20 years ago I bought a Hamilton model 21 ship's chronometer. It's an early one, pre 400 serial number, and is a thing of beauty, as these generally are. Back when I got it, I had a professional service it for me. It was done well, but wasn't cheap. $400-500, IIRC. I used to display it in my living room and run it occasionally just to hear the escapement and marvel it its accuracy. From about 2009 to 2014 it sat in my storage unit, waiting for new digs. In 2014 I wound it up and it took off running. I let it run down and then put it away for a couple of years. When I pulled it out, I discovered that it had a broken balance pivot. While originally I thought someone had knocked it over and wasn't copping to it, but now, after inspecting the upper pivot's wear, I don't think that's the case.
      After botching the first staff I got trying to replace the hub, I set it aside again for the past couple of years. The way I broke the staff was I overestimated how deep the hollowness went in my hollow punch that I was using to tap it on. It bottomed out in the punch and destroyed the pivot.
      Now that I'm finally over that disappointment, I decided to give it another go. I bought a staff that already had the hub installed. I may have to polish the lower pivot, as it doesn't seem to want to set in the hole jewel properly. I'm in the process of verifying all of this. I had to tear down the chronometer at least to the point where I could check to see if the broken part of the pivot was impeding the staff from setting properly. The hole jewel is clear.
      I'm doing the best I can to do it right, and get it running again. I won't be running it, but want it running just in case I should decide to sell it. Otherwise the value drops quite a bit. Since I have it completely torn down now, I might as well clean and oil it. Does anyone have a hot tip on the best cleaning solutions for cleaning these chronometers? I'd like to use something that will cross over and work for my cleaning of watches as well. I have both an ultrasonic and the small L&R mechanical. I have one more fresh batch of cleaner and rinse, petroleum, no-water, formula. Should I use that, or make, or get, something new? Any tips for oil and grease types to get me by? Any suggestions are appreciated.
      I do have the Manual for the movement.
      I know that this is risky business, my working on this chrono, but I just can't afford to spend another $500 to get it running. Plus, I heard that if you're going to run these, you've got to spend this $500 or so to service them every few years. That is not going to happen. Feedback, suggestions, warnings, tips, etc., are all welcome. Many thanks. Cheers.
       
    • By kmcderm133
      So, while waiting to fix the Seiko misadventures of my youth, I went looking for broken pocket watch movements on ebay. (I had read somewhere that a good way to start is clocks for their larger parts, then pocket watches as an intermediate stage and then wristwatches for the smallest movements and parts.) After losing several auctions for promising non-working pocket watches I found a New York Standard possibly "Model 11". It was mostly disassembled and there is much rust/corrosion. I think it's missing at least the clutch, for example. It needs new hands, but this isn't impossible. The main problem here is the rust. It looks like someone disassembled this watch on purpose but I don't know how it came to be so rusted. (Maybe it was parted out? It would be nice to have a tech book on this watch.) 
      So I've been looking over rust removal methods. One video says to use water and baking soda with a brush. Many advocate the use of a "solvent" without being very specific. I have a .pdf of a 1940's War Dept. Technical Manual for watch repair. (you know, for when you're in a trench and taking fire and need to know what time it is but your watch is broken) Among other things this book recommends using pith and I think maybe pegwood as well as solvents or the like that are only referred to by what I think are military requisition numbers.
       My circumstances are such that I can't afford a sonic jewelry cleaner, and I don't have a dedicated work area and limited storage for tools. The baking soda method appeals to me but I think this works mostly by abrasion, the baking soda being gritty. I'm afraid this could damage smaller parts. I could upload pictures if anyone's interested. 
    • By jakobvinkas
      Hello, I could not fint any answer to this on any other thread.
      Im using Isopropyl alcohol for the last step of hand cleaning movements. However i can not find a good way to throw used liquid away. How do you do it, I know that the liquid will turn into gas eventually however since i fill a small jar there is always going to come times when i need to throw it away. Where do i throw it?
      How do you do it?
      Thanks in advance, Jakob
    • By Shirdel
      Hi
      I have recently gotten interested to learn and acquire knowledge about watches and there movements.
      I have a question for the initiated,if there is rust in the parts of the watch must the patts be replaced or can they be cleaned with a rust removal process or is that not advisable due to the parts being very fragile in nature.
       
      Thanks again for youre time.
    • By dreja
      Hello,
      I have disassembled the Poljot 2209 movement.
      I would would need your advice, if it is ok to wash also the "double gear" and how to oil it later...
      Thanks
      Andrej

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    • I don't doubt that it didn't made a problem but the attached service sheet indicates 9010 for the third wheel. As a general rule HP (High Pressure, is not even really an oil) is used to parts that are driven from turning the crown, or directly by the barrel. All the rest get fine oil. _C_T_CT_2824-2_FDE_481688_24.pdf
    • Do the day change? With the dial removed check that the day / date  driving wheel turns, that date ring is free and its finger spring is engaged. You will need to remove the calendar plate to correct any problem in this area. At the same time check quick-set. Attached service sheet.   7S26C_36C.pdf
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    • I recently got a nice set of dust covers Envoyé de mon moto g(7) power en utilisant Tapatalk
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