Jump to content

How Do You Refill Your Oil Dishes?


Recommended Posts

Maybe this is a dumb question but how do you refill your oil dishes without wasting three months worth of oil dripping down the rim of the oil jar? 

I've tried straight up pour it in. This results in drips down the edge of the bottle.

I've tried polarity tricks similar to what I've used when pouring water (use a chopstick is a cup to avoid drips, etc). I this case I use an acrylic stir stick as a pour stick. Results have been better but still wasting some oil. 

What else can I do? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Paulj said:

I'm also very new but filling the oil cups I use only requires a few drops in the cup..... I just dip my widest oiler into the vial of oil then rest it in the hollow of the cup.  The oil will run into the cup... rinse and repeat.

Screenshot by Snip My at Dec 11, 2022 at 10:56:05 PM.png

The most sensible answer by far.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure this question came up a few weeks ago? I use my No 1 tweezers, dip it into the oil container, then transfer it over to the cup - making sure the tips of the tweezers contact that base of the cup - and open them up. Voila - usually enough so I only need to do this once. Obviously you want to pre and post clean your tweezers when doing this using liberal amounts of IPA

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, gbyleveldt said:

I'm pretty sure this question came up a few weeks ago? I use my No 1 tweezers, dip it into the oil container, then transfer it over to the cup - making sure the tips of the tweezers contact that base of the cup - and open them up. Voila - usually enough so I only need to do this once. Obviously you want to pre and post clean your tweezers when doing this using liberal amounts of IPA

It certainly did come up Gert, then went down a hare horifice as to the reasons why a syringe shouldn't be used. I kept well out of the discussion 😌

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, gbyleveldt said:

I'm pretty sure this question came up a few weeks ago? I use my No 1 tweezers, dip it into the oil container, then transfer it over to the cup - making sure the tips of the tweezers contact that base of the cup - and open them up. Voila - usually enough so I only need to do this once. Obviously you want to pre and post clean your tweezers when doing this using liberal amounts of IPA

Clever! I'm going to try this out. Thanks! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use tweezers as well, but just to be different I use my No.5's. another method I saw recently was to get some 1ml syringes and the finest needles available, the fill the syringe and use the needle to transfer the tiny amount needed, then keep the syringe with the rest of its contents safe until a top up is needed.  That is probably one of the less wasteful methods I have seen. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I find it depends upon the size of the  bottle but my hairspring tweezers work quite nicely. Squeeze them together insert into the bottle. It will I Or action holds a nice drop near the tip place the tip into your oil container open the tweezers and the drop will go into the oil. Just remember to keep her tweezers clean afterwards.

I've seen a bottle of older Elgin oil or it actually had in the bottle itself a small glass rod with a little ball on the end.  which seemed like a nice idea for getting oil out but you would have to have a bigger bottle and typically are Swiss bottles are a fraction of the size of the Elgin  bottle. Then later on they There are using tiny squeeze bottles

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
  • 1 year later...

Thanks!  I haven't started oiling yet, but I want to know before I start wasting the stuff - it is too expensive to waste a molecule!

I may try all of the above suggestions  with a cheaper oil to get my "feet wet" (and then they get slippery and I fall down! 🤣

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I follow your walkthrough with great interest!  I'm not sure how I would do it but still think I would try to follow their recommendation. My only question is how do you practically go about quickly rotating the rotor in the benzine? I would follow their recommendation. Oiling correctly is often an underrated art with far greater consequences than most people realise. I don't think it's a coincidence that JLC recommends 941. That said, in this particular case, I think you can safely use 9010 if you don't have or don't want to invest in 941. Yes, it is undeniably strange. Maybe the explanation is that there is a difference between viscosity and "viscosity index"!? I understand that 9010 is a much older oil than 941. I guess JLC has found through practical experiments that they get marginally better results with 941 for just the rotor bearing, but who knows?
    • Hi Everyone I am not going to attempt to fix the movement. I want to remove it so I can clean the face. I will then see if the watch/movement can be repaired by a watch expert. If not I'm going to locate a new movement. I just wanted to clean the face my self and have the knowledge to remove the movement. Thanks 
    • Alright... while I still hope for some answers, I'll continue my walk-through.  For now, just a quick post about the cleaning procedure. I did peg all the jewels and cleaned off dirt, oil etc with Rodico. Pivots cleaned with EVE pin polishers (only briefly to remove dirt). Then parts go in a couple of cleaning baskets (round brass ones) and inside of stainless tea filters... inside the Elma waterless cleaning (one 10min cycle) and rinsing liquids (two 10min cycles) in the ultrasonic.   After the cleaning, I put the parts in storage trays, cover them with a type of cellulose "paper" (that lets through the air, but protects from dust). And put that in the oven at 57°C (not too hot to avoid melting the shellac on the roller jewel).
    • Have you taken any out and had a look at them?
    • Your first few posts need approving, not sure of the number after that no approval needed. 
×
×
  • Create New...