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I recently obtained this Harper watch (see pic).  It has a 17j A. Schild 1187 movement which had a broken mainspring and needed a good cleaning (lot's of oil, whew!).  I cleaned it and after some mishaps--including losing a cap jewel which I was able to rectify thanks to the generosity of a fellow Watch Repair Talk(er)--was able to replace the mainspring and get the watch running.

 

It's an inexpensive watch (I bought it for $3) but I was very heartened that I could get it running.  Id's say it dates from the 50s - 60s?

 

I have never encountered a watch with kind of back this one has.  It has two pieces: a back plate and a screw ring (name?).  Underneath the back plate was a gasket that had completely deteriorated over the decades.  Now my challenge is to find a replacement.  Not sure what it is I'm looking for.  Does this kind of back have a special name and how would one specify the size of the gasket?  From the size of the movement or the case?

 

You'll have to click on the image to see all of it.  Please excuse the clumsy image composition.  Still learning how to use Gimp 2.

post-940-0-28611200-1436286594_thumb.jpg

Edited by DouglasSkinner

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Lots of dive watches and USSR era Sekondas use that locking ring method. Less chance of chewing up a gasket when closing it.

The gasket measurements are taken from the case.

Locate channel it sits in and using some digital calipers measure the inner and outer diameter plus the depth of the channel.

I think it looks like you need a flat gasket.

See here for size availability.

http://www.watch-batteries.com/Gaskets/Flat.htm

This info was from my own amateur experience at finding a gasket for my dive watch and Sekonda.

Other actual watch makers will correct any mistakes I may have made.

Edited by ro63rto

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