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Eye Loupe Headband not fitting?


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Hi all,

Just getting into this hobby and got a loupe with a Bergeon steel handband to hold it. I cannot for the life of me, get this in a comfortable position. Has anyone had this problem too? If so what was your solution? I'm wondering if the specific headband I bought just isn't the right one for me and have to just try another brand.

Anything helps, thanks guys.

 

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The headband can be bent to better fit the individual.

There 2 ways of wearing the headband. The first way is to have the band exit on the same side of the eye and go around the back of the head and the come around to the the front, ending up on the forehead. This method requires more adjustments to get the loupe to fit properly.

The second method is to wind around the head in the other direction. i.e. run across the forehead first, around the back of the head and end up on the temple. This method seems to fit me better.

Try out both methods and see which suits you better.

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I know what you mean about the way the wire band can fit. I bought one over 15 years ago and another about 10 years back. The newer one looks identical to the first, but doesn't fit as well. Visually I can't tell any difference between the two. 

If you wear glasses of any type, you might consider the loupes that clip on the front of the temple. If you can get them to stay put on the temple, they're as comfortable as wearing your glasses, with the right amount of "boost".  Good luck.

 

 

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  • 1 year later...

I couldn't get on with a wire either so bought a cheap pair of reading glasses from the chemist, pushed out one of the lenses, drilled a 1" hole in the other and fitted the loupe through the hole. So easy to get on and off.

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@watchweasol  Sure no problem. As I said I couldn't get on with the wire holder for the loupe and had no chance of holding in with my face muscles for any length of time (how do they do that??!) so had an idea when I saw a cheap pair of £2 reading glasses in the chemist. I bought a pair and after taping up the lens with masking tape drilled a 25mm hole in the centre, I only had a wood drill bit so went very gently. I think it helped it was blunt or it would have probably broke the lens.  I then ground/filed/sanded out the hole (quite easy as its plastic) until a loupe fitted through (about 27mm for mine). I then removed the other lens . The loupe is removed and changed easily and is comfortable to wear. Hope this helps someone else.👍

Drill.jpg

 

Glasses (2).jpg

Edited by Burruz
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HI @watchweasol  Its primitive but I am grateful for your kind comments. If I wore glasses I would probably have got the clip on ones although these may have held the loupe too far from my eye. With my 'creation' I can adjust the depth as well by sliding the loupe further in or out. One thing I forgot to mention was that before I drilled the hole I took a look at myself in the mirror and marked the centre of my eye on the lens as it will probably be off centre. 👍

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great simple idea, I love it.  I was battling with optics when I started.  In the end I have a clip on loupe for some work, but recently purchased a stereoscopic microscope from Amscope.  Total gamechanger for me.  I've been straightening out hairsprings ever since 🙂

Edited by MikeEll
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Hi Mike

Yeah I think I will have to bite the bullet and spend some money on a microscope even if for inspection purposes only. Just got to figure out how I justify it to the missus!😁

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