Jump to content

Brass tweezer recommendation


Recommended Posts

31 minutes ago, Knebo said:

Brass is so soft and wears so quickly that I didn't want to spend so much on Dumont or big brands...

You should consider titanium, reasonably cheap and material seems to be the best of both worlds between brass and steel, see my writeup above - just a suggestion

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, Waggy said:

You should consider titanium, reasonably cheap and material seems to be the best of both worlds between brass and steel, see my writeup above - just a suggestion

Thanks, I read it now. I'll include a pair of titanium in my next Cousins order (won't be long 😉 ).

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

49 minutes ago, Knebo said:

I have a couple of very expensive Dumont tweezers in steel alloy, No3 and No5 for very fine tasks. But my main tweezers are cheap No3 brass ones from Cousins "Swiss style".

 https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/brass-tweezers-cousins-swiss-style

They are cheap and don't come perfect. I spend some time very regularly to dress them. Like this they work very well.

Brass is so soft and wears so quickly that I didn't want to spend so much on Dumont or big brands...

I only use brass tweezers with wide tips anything over 2mm,  any narrower than this and they bend too easily when gripping. What do we use thin narrow tweezers for ? Mostly for picking up screws, springs and  jewels , these are not things that would be noticeably easily scratched so a steel option would be an ok choice.  Unless very skillful with tweezers picking up plates, positioning bridges and cocks ,handling the balance, wheels ,setting components etc, steel could very well scratch these parts as more grip is required this is why i use brass with wide tips and also some titanium ones now that I've just dressed extra wide to about 4mm.  The titanium tweezers have a nice light feel to them and dont scratch .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

I only use brass tweezers with wide tips anything over 2mm,  any narrower than this and they bend too easily when gripping. What do we use thin narrow tweezers for ? Mostly for picking up screws, springs and  jewels , these are not things that would be noticeably easily scratched so a steel option would be an ok choice.  Unless very skillful with tweezers picking up plates, positioning bridges and cocks ,handling the balance, wheels ,setting components etc, steel could very well scratch these parts as more grip is required this is why i use brass with wide tips and also some titanium ones now that I've just dressed extra wide to about 4mm.  The titanium tweezers have a nice light feel to them and dont scratch .

What you describe sounds perfectly reasonable. I can't disagree with anything.

I guess we come to a point where it's really about personal preference.

Personally, I use my brass tweezers dressed to about 1mm for almost everything. From plates to screws and jewels. I rarely find them bent. But I do have to dress them frequently.

Then I use thicker brass tweezers (2mm tip), e.g. for inserting the barrel arbor or sometimes for thicker springs. And No5 steel to manipulate shock settings (not grabbing, but just pushing with the 0.1mm tip). Wide and thin carbon tweezers for dials and hands (or jewel picker-uppers), respectively.  But this is all personal preference, I think.

Most approaches seem to be fair game as long as we're not scratching bridges with steel tweezers.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, Knebo said:

What you describe sounds perfectly reasonable. I can't disagree with anything.

I guess we come to a point where it's really about personal preference.

Personally, I use my brass tweezers dressed to about 1mm for almost everything. From plates to screws and jewels. I rarely find them bent. But I do have to dress them frequently.

Then I use thicker brass tweezers (2mm tip), e.g. for inserting the barrel arbor or sometimes for thicker springs. And No5 steel to manipulate shock settings (not grabbing, but just pushing with the 0.1mm tip). Wide and thin carbon tweezers for dials and hands (or jewel picker-uppers), respectively.  But this is all personal preference, I think.

Most approaches seem to be fair game as long as we're not scratching bridges with steel tweezers.

Some of the basics apply to just about about everyone but yep definitely a personal choice for the finer points. What i found with handling bigger parts with narrow tweezers is that the surface grip is low and the part would often slip and move around while it was being positioned so i try to use the wider brass 2mm for as much as i can even screws to i certain size.  Titanium is definitely worth a go , i bought these a while back but have only just begun to try them out, i made the tips really wide and then use the edges for lifting screws out.

17180997551527740453970697731323.jpg

17180999983678957965732225467588.jpg

4 minutes ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

Some of the basics apply to just about about everyone but yep definitely a personal choice for the finer points. What i found with handling bigger parts with narrow tweezers is that the surface grip is low and the part would often slip and move around while it was being positioned so i try to use the wider brass 2mm for as much as i can even screws to i certain size.  Titanium is definitely worth a go , i bought these a while back but have only just begun to try them out, i made the tips really wide and then use the edges for lifting screws out.

17180997551527740453970697731323.jpg

17180999983678957965732225467588.jpg

🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣 i really must be more aware of what is in my photo shot you're  all lucky i have underpants on 🤣🤣🤣🤣

Edited by Neverenoughwatches
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

Some of the basics apply to just about about everyone but yep definitely a personal choice for the finer points. What i found with handling bigger parts with narrow tweezers is that the surface grip is low and the part would often slip and move around while it was being positioned so i try to use the wider brass 2mm for as much as i can even screws to i certain size.  Titanium is definitely worth a go , i bought these a while back but have only just begun to try them out, i made the tips really wide and then use the edges for lifting screws out.

17180997551527740453970697731323.jpg

17180999983678957965732225467588.jpg

🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣 i really must be more aware of what is in my photo shot you're  all lucky i have underpants on 🤣🤣🤣🤣

your tweezers are more dressed than you 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/11/2024 at 9:06 AM, Knebo said:

Brass is so soft and wears so quickly that I didn't want to spend so much on Dumont or big brands...

I almost always use only brass tweezers myself. I got hold of a bunch of second-hand Dumonts on eBay in good condition. After I dressed them initially, it's pretty rare I've had to dress them again. I really like them because it takes very little energy to pinch them together. It gives an improved sense of control. The only downside is that the opening is a bit too narrow.

However, I think you should be a bit careful using brass tweezers if you need to be a bit rough because the metal is soft, and brass shavings can get into the movement or somewhere you don't want them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I'll go halves with them John , we can share it 😉
    • Besides locktite Nev, is there anything random that you use to fix in the pivot ?
    • Thanks Hector, I do think though that the problem I am experiencing is specific to Miyota movement in general and the 6T series in particular.  When you describe putting the bridge you are talking about the train wheels.  The problem here is that under that same bridge you have the 4 train wheel, the barrel, 2 extra winding related wheels and the center sweep pinion.  I can mostly put them in their holes but 2 of those (the 4th wheel and the second pinion are completely under the plate so I can't nudge them in the right position.   I managed it with a larger Miyota 8200 series but with the smaller 6T15 it is even worse. Anyway, I'll retry tomorrow evening or this week end.  This evening is going another rock climbing day (going from very light pressure on tweezers to much more force going through the fingers, although in climbing we also want to use the absolute minimum grip which won't make us fall to save the muscle and be able to climb longer routes). to add insults to injury, if you read this thread from the start, I initially messed up the disassembly as I couldn't detach the rotor.  I normally (and I think I did this time too) put all my parts in their individual compartments in the part tray and I am doing my best to be very careful about them.  But in the week and a half it took to figure out how to detach the rotor I somehow lost the screws from the bridge.  I have a few others which will be needed later.  I know they are reference 922-600 but I couldn't find what it means in general term so I don't know if I can buy replacements or an assortment of screws and replace those 2 by others.
    • Something that can happen with a lyre spring, the back of the arms can bind against the shoulders of the chaton cut out where the spring is fixed in when the spring is lifted out of the way. To stop the spring bending or breaking it needs pulling forward slightly before lifting so it clears the edge of the chaton.
    • One way is to file it by hand. Good file with sharp edge is needed. Another way is with the aid of milling attachment. There is one more way, thyat is really only on the lathe, but the arbor has to be attached perpendicular to the axis of the spindle. Will be easier to show pictures than to explain this. I must say 'Good night' as my wife is now awake and is roaring when I get closer to the computer...
×
×
  • Create New...