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Replacing the regulating pin and boot on a balance


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I have a watch whos regulating pin and boot (don't know if those are the correct terms), are misshapen.  The pin is crooked, and the boot fouls against it, so it pinches the hairspring rather than keeping the spring centered between them.  I want to replace it, but I don't know how it's connected.  I can't tell if its friction fit, riveted, glued, or whatever.  I will try to get a picture of the regulator from the top if it will be helpful.

Does anyone have any information on how to complete this task?  I do believe Cousins sells replacement assortments for both pieces.

IMG_20220716_151757.jpg

Edited by GregG
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39 minutes ago, GregG said:

 I do believe Cousins sells replacement assortments for both pieces.

I wouldn't count on finding a good replacement for these, and much less on having an easy job of replacing them without breaking something that is whole at the present time.

I would try first to gently straighten the pin with some wide tip tweezers. And then with the watch running, observe if and where it touches and correct it so that it moves evenly in between.

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1 hour ago, GregG said:

riveted,

The boot is usually riveted in place.  Somewhere in one of my books I've seen a picture of how to replace the pin but I'm reasonably sure that the latest project. Of course the easy way to figure out that is you look at the other side and see if the pin is just a street tapered pin or whether it has a base to it.

1 hour ago, jdm said:

I wouldn't count on finding a good replacement for these, and much less on having an easy job of replacing them without breaking something that is whole at the present time.

The classic problem of watch repair try to fix it to make it perfect or leave it the way it Is. Right now If you're really careful you should be able to straighten the pin.

 

 

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16 minutes ago, JohnR725 said:

The boot is usually riveted in place.  Somewhere in one of my books I've seen a picture of how to replace the pin but I'm reasonably sure that the latest project. Of course the easy way to figure out that is you look at the other side and see if the pin is just a street tapered pin or whether it has a base to it.

The classic problem of watch repair try to fix it to make it perfect or leave it the way it Is. Right now If you're really careful you should be able to straighten the pin.

 

 

Part of the problem is that the boot is causing the pin to bend.  For whatever reason, when the boot is tuned into place, it fouls so hard against the pin that it bends the pin.

I ordered a copy of Bench Practices by Fried.  It has a section dedicated to replacing the pins/boots.

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I just went through this, see this thread - 

 The Fried book is good, it goes into detail about making replacement pins. You can also buy an assortment at Cousins. 

With respect to the above thread, it turns out that K&D made a punch for their staking tools that is actually a holder for sub punches, I now have one and any new sub punches that I make will be for that holder.

 

Good Luck!

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12 hours ago, dadistic said:

I just went through this, see this thread - 

 The Fried book is good, it goes into detail about making replacement pins. You can also buy an assortment at Cousins. 

With respect to the above thread, it turns out that K&D made a punch for their staking tools that is actually a holder for sub punches, I now have one and any new sub punches that I make will be for that holder.

 

Good Luck!

Thanks for the link.  It looks like the "sub-punch" holder can actually be devised by turning a custom one and using a Seitz reaming spindle to do the job.  I would assume this process works for the boot as well as the pin?

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