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Thinning spring & coiling


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  • 3 weeks later...

This guy is impressive.

Recently (and I posted about it), I was faced with a 400-day suspension spring that was too thick.  The clock ran fast.  Rather than order another of the correct size, I used sandpaper folded over the spring.  I ran the folded sandpaper up and down repeatedly.  This worked wonderfully well to calibrate the rate of the clock.

But, the work in this video is many pay-grades above my little effort!

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    • Thanks so much for all the tips! I tried both methods. I tried pulling the pins with two pliers but they wouldn't budge. I then tried the method shown in the clip but that was way too much effort and I was pretty sure the bracelet would not have looked right once I was done. I ended up getting a similar bracelet that's easy to resize but I'm glad we gave this a shot.
    • Yes. This machine can function in 2 modes, soldering and spot welding. The spot welding mode can be used for broken screw removal as well as repairing broken mainspring bridles. If your DIY one works fine, then there is no need to buy another machine. But if you are thinking of buying a new machine, I suggest you wait awhile because I heard that there is a new machine under development that in addition to the above 2 functions, has a 3rd mode that can be used to fill pits in corroded metal surfaces.
    • Thanks for clearing that up, I was just going by how it appeared to work in the few videos I had seen on line, especially comparing it to my own manual current based jobby, when they was showing it being used to remove a broken stem it seemed to weld as no solder paste was used. I will see if I can find the video. Did seem to work very well though, just trying not to buy it as my DIY one seems to work ok and i dont do enough to justify the cost, but ghen again we do seem to say that a lot Found the video It's on this sellers page https://a.aliexpress.com/_mtyFJxo You can see solder paste being used for the dial foot but not when removing the broken stem from the crown, it looked to me to be more like the flash from a spot welder which was why I thought it was based on a capacitor discharge like one of those spot welders used for battery pack assembly.
    • Well what do you say, if this is the work of a reputable clock repair it’s pretty poor. It is definitly needing a rebush. What Old Hippy has said holds true. The old bush out the hole tidying up and a new bush pressing in. I my self would drill the hole to remove the punch marks and make a bush to restore the plate but for that you need a lathe. Looking at the bush the condition of the pivot may also need attention, burnishing at the least to restore the surface. It’s not impossible to do it by hand , but will take care and time.
    • Thanks old hippy Its  shame really as it was purchased from a reputable clock repairer for not an inconsiderable sum. As you say it has been botched; even I can I can see that and I'm not a clock repairer.  Plugging holes sounds quite technical; what's involved please? I'm trying to weigh up how much of this I can do myself.  Thanks so far.
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