Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Now that I have your attention with the catchy title!

Here is a hairspring that come from a watch that I have little invested in, but I would like to get it working...an old elgin ladies pendant watch.

I show the hairspring as it came out of the watch and then again after I have worked on it for awhile.  I think I am getting close, but now each adjustment seems more sensitive, so I am taking it very very slow.  I have watch some videos on bending hairsprings but watching and doing are two different things.

For tweezers, I am using a Dumont #3 in my left hand and Dumont #6 in my right (I am right handed).  I feel like I would have more control with two #6.  As you can see, I have stabilized the hairspring in pith wood because I felt like it would be better than driving the brass pin into pine or some other relatively soft wood.

Any thoughts?

2022-07-03 09_57_15-IMG_8799.JPG ‎- Photos.png

2022-07-03 09_57_29-IMG_8800.JPG ‎- Photos.png

Edited by LittleWatchShop
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, LittleWatchShop said:

so I am taking it very very slow.

the slow aspect is really really important.  hairspring work is not something you rush you really want to concentrate on what you're doing

1 hour ago, LittleWatchShop said:

I have watch some videos on bending hairsprings but watching and doing are two different things.

yes the videos that's a classic problem with the videos. For one thing in the videos most people of videos want to make a decent video they want to make you happy they want to show a good outcome and how many videos are really realistic on this is really hard and I may not succeed?

another thing helps his books this is the one I find is really good

 Bench Practices for Watch And clockmakers –  Henry B. Fried (Author) 1954 1974

the book is interesting in that it came in different versions in some versions don't have all the section so some versions are missing the hairspring section. They hairspring section is really really good as it covers how to fix things with hairsprings lots of things. Although Henry tends to make everything look really really simple somewhere out there I think on YouTube is a video of him straightening hairsprings. But the book works really really nicely

then Amazon can be quite amusing and somebody didn't tell the people at the last link that their book is very rare in the prices very bad just way too low in place notice Amazon prices are not desirable at all which is what sometimes happens with Amazon I have to wonder how they come up with those prices

https://www.amazon.com/Bench-practices-watch-clockmakers-Henry/dp/B0006CEZ08

https://www.amazon.com/Bench-Practices-Watch-Clockmakers-Henry/dp/096562191X

https://www.clockworks.com/product/bench-practices-for-watch-and-clockmakers-by-henry-b-fried

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, JohnR725 said:

 Bench Practices for Watch And clockmakers –  Henry B. Fried (Author) 1954 1974

I have this book and it does have an extensive amount of hairspring material.  I wonder how different it is from the one you list.

I was looking at the breguet section several weeks ago but did not review it in prep for this exercise.

I wish I had a set of those bending tweezers.  I have been looking for them but so far, no luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, LittleWatchShop said:

 I have stabilized the hairspring in pith wood because I felt like it would be better than driving the brass pin into pine or some other relatively soft wood.

I cut and place a piece of white paper over the pith wood before you pin the spring on, you can see details better in contrast ( white &  spring). 

Cigarette boxes the kind that contains 20 cigartte is good, better than thin paper. 

This should be easy to fix, at least you know where the bend was and already studded.

Good luck

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Nucejoe said:

pin the spring on, you can see details better in contrast ( white &  spring). 

another way to work on hairsprings is in the image I'm attaching

1 hour ago, LittleWatchShop said:

have this book and it does have an extensive amount of hairspring material.  I wonder how different it is from the one you list.

the problem is there seems we always variations slightly different table changes and of course different prices from extremely amusing to realistic for a paperback I've attached images of the table of contents so you can compare

hairspring glass.jpg

bp--2.JPG

bp--1.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, JohnR725 said:

the problem is there seems we always variations slightly

This is VERY helpful! 

Table of contents is identical except for Book III, III-Part II.  Notice the word "New" which indicates they have modified that section.  As you know, I am the co-author of a textbook, now in the third edition.  You gotta change something to make it "fresh" so that the previous editions are not so interesting.  In my case, though, we let our imagination get away with us...lol.

1 hour ago, JohnR725 said:

another way to work on hairsprings is in the image I'm attaching

I bought this quite a while back but have yet to see its value.  If I told you how much money I have invested in this "hobby" it would melt your screen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, LittleWatchShop said:

I bought this quite a while back but have yet to see its value.  If I told you how much money I have invested in this "hobby" it would melt your screen.

when I was in school in Switzerland we used it from working on hairsprings. It may be because you can look through the glass you don't get some shadowing effects you do that when you're looking out on paper. But that was a long time ago so maybe there are better ways today.

yes somebody else was telling them a while back what they had spent on tools this year and the number seemed a little on the high side. While as a students in school we had to purchase some tools new. I rapidly got introduced to nawcc regional meetings. Seattle wasn't big enough to have their own meeting every year so they alternated with Portland. Between them and several national meetings always a good place to buy tools and things because at that time there was no eBay to compete. Now you're stuck with eBay and the ability to get really good deals isn't going to be there sometimes sometimes you might be lucky.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thought I would post progress even though it is not done and disaster could strike at any moment.  Also to give @Nucejoea million kudos for the paper idea.  It makes a world of difference!

Hairspring is not planar, so I have to work that out.  I realized that whoever goobered up the hairspring also dissappeared the regulator, so I am essentially stuck with this incomplete situation, however, I think a donor I got on ebay will at least address that...will know when it arrives.

This exercise may never end up in the watch, but I think it is important for me to do in order to incrementally improve my skills for when I have no other choice.

2022-07-04 10_06_02-IMG_8801.JPG ‎- Photos.png

2022-07-04 10_05_52-IMG_8802.JPG ‎- Photos.png

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice work! The general rule is for truing "in the round", correction is done at 90 degrees to the max error; truing "in the flat" correction is made at 180 degrees to max error.

 

In your case there are bends next to bends, so keep those rules in mind but work as each case demands. Work from inside out. Pretty sure you'll save this spring!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am gonna stop here until I get the regulator from a donor.  This still needs some tweaking and it really is supposed to be an over coil, so I will make the measurements when I get the donor and then proceed further.

My technique changed as I progressed.  I quite using the Dumont #3 in my left hand and, instead, used another curved tweezer.  Not a #6, but I have some curved tweezers that I dressed to work nicely for this application.

2022-07-04 13_18_12-IMG_8804.JPG ‎- Photos.png

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/3/2022 at 6:14 PM, LittleWatchShop said:

I have this book and it does have an extensive amount of hairspring material.  I wonder how different it is from the one you list.

I was looking at the breguet section several weeks ago but did not review it in prep for this exercise.

I wish I had a set of those bending tweezers.  I have been looking for them but so far, no luck.

This has a good section on hairsprings inc. Vibrating. It was £18.99

16569683302673784023744784888960.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/3/2022 at 7:53 PM, JohnR725 said:
On 7/3/2022 at 7:46 PM, Nucejoe said:

 

another way to work on hairsprings is in the image I'm attaching

How is this used John ?

3 minutes ago, LittleWatchShop said:

Is there an echo in here?

Haha sorry. I know i just saw yours two mins after i posted this 😆

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I have bought myself a Hudie watch which was a chinese brand owned by the also now defunct Hongqi watch factory. The watch is about 25 years old. I want to remove the movement so I can polish the case and caseback, as well as regulate the movement because it's running a bit fast. And more than anything I am curious to see which movement resides inside. However there is a problem. The caseback will not budge at all. I put it in my vice and tried to remove it with my bergeon caseback ball and it will not move a millimeter; the ball just gives out and slips after enough force is applied. I tried heating the caseback too to no avail. I had this problem once before and krazy glued a nut to the caseback and removed it that way but I'd prefer not to do that again if anyone knows any other tricks. It's so stuck I thought it might be a snap on caseback but I do not see any opening to slip a tool in and I also believe the majority of these hudie casebacks are screwdown design like the other similar chinese ones. I actually think it might be glued on because I scrapped off something that seemed like epoxy and in that case I have 0 clue if it'd even be possible to open. Thank you.
    • Ladies and gents, I found the most awesome old gold watch chain!  It has spring links!  I am always so careful with my antique pocket watches, and still fear to drop them, even while on a chain. I've re-staffed a number of balance wheels that no doubt suffered a similar fate. But this chain has lessened that fear somewhat.  So my "watch of today" was my beautiful Elgin 339 clipped to this chain.
    • For me, there’s no binary yes/no answer to this. It really is a matter of feel, experience, inspection under magnification, the age of the movement and what a replacement costs vs invested effort to “revive” it that all play a role determining the answer above. For an Omega 56x series reverser wheel you’ll spend more time trying to revive a reverser (which, by the way is also much more serviceable, but also harder and more expensive to find a replacement for) than you would an a Sellita SW200 where replacements are cheap and easy to find.
    • That's what I did after my Pearl machine stopped working. I've run about 5 watches through it so far and get results as expected. One interesting note is that their customer service says the machine comes with a 2 year warranty but that is not indicated on the website and when asked via email they are unable to provide a copy of the warranty, which I believe runs counter to US federal law 🤷‍♂️  Luckily for me the service center they use for repairs is local to me so if I ever do need to have it serviced I won't have to ship it in its HUGE box.
    • @JohnR725I live in a “3rd world” country (South Africa) and even here you can’t make a middle class living charging $120 to service a watch. I make many times that spending that same amount of time in my day job. But quote the average someone $200 to service their inherited vintage Omega (that stopped working 20 years ago) and you’re told you’re effing mad. This is why watchmaking is dead as a profession in modern times; everyone wants that cool mechanical watch, no one considers what it costs to maintain it. A wrist watch is no longer an essential tool, it’s novelty jewellery. So I do it as a hobby, a make a few videos and I fix broken things. If this hobby can make a little money to at least contribute to its vast expenses then that’s a bonus. I have many other hobbies that are just money pits, so there’s at least that. Speaking of making videos: there’s a lot of criticism being levelled at YouTube watchmakers, either because they don’t show enough detail, or that they talk too much, or that they’re hacks, or whatever other negative thing you can imagine. But these YouTube watchmakers have done more to expose watchmaking to the average Joe than what any of the professional watchmaking institutions have ever done. Professional watchmakers scoff at these “hacks” in their comment sections but fail to see how these YouTubers create interest in the average Joe and turn them into enthusiasts. Anyway, enough rambling from me…
×
×
  • Create New...