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Tutorials by Alex Hamilton


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1 hour ago, Kalanag said:

There is a new channel called „It‘s About F*****g Time“ by watchmaker Alex Hamilton (known on Youtube by his channel „The Watchsmith“) . The new channel is dedicated to watch repair tutorials for beginners and worth watching imho.

https://youtube.com/channel/UCXV8h3I9pnfZuDpg6xEM_8w

He's a great guy and has a brilliant sense of humour. He goes into quite deep detail as well. Hehe, he even gave me a shout out in one of his videos 😛

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Subscribed on my computer but was unable to find using search on the Fire Stick/TV where I watch most (so I actually had to log-in on the TV). Will run through what he's got posted to date...

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We can remove the balance- cock assembly  safer than the bearded guy.

Do not remove the cock screw, just loosen it enough to loosen the cock, once you have partially unpinned the locating pins,  proceed with removing the cock screw. 

With this approach you have the cock secured on the mainplate by the cock screw( not fully unscrewed, not removed) , preventing cock from falling off as you are unpinning it. 

                Better safe than to look pro.

 

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45 minutes ago, Nucejoe said:

We can remove the balance- cock assembly  safer than the bearded guy.

Do not remove the cock screw, just loosen it enough to loosen the cock, once you have partially unpinned the locating pins,  proceed with removing the cock screw. 

With this approach you have the cock secured on the mainplate by the cock screw( not fully unscrewed, not removed) , preventing cock from falling off as you are unpinning it. 

                Better safe than to look pro.

 

That’s a very good tip, thank you. Suffice to say I’ve had the cock jump off the plate when trying to lift it off the steady pins, only for it to land next to the movement with hairspring attached. And a few more grey hairs in my beard 🤣

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My watchmaker used to say " hairspring is the first part newbies ruins and spend most time on to sort out often with poor results". 

Bunch of good advice from Alex though,     don't ruin it to begin with.

 

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On 6/21/2022 at 4:25 PM, gbyleveldt said:

Hahaha no ways, I thought you knew from the Tissot video?

Nice one bearded buddy👍. Call me number 246. Lol 😆 

3 minutes ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

Nice one bearded buddy👍. Call me number 246. Lol 😆 

Maybe I'll send you this. It seems quite apt now i know you also have a mass of facial hair. (As well) 😆

16559152244372036939529477045648.jpg

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10 hours ago, gbyleveldt said:

Hahhahahahaa awesome!

So you are the man to talk to about Seikos, cool. Its good to specialise, my forté is being a lazy good for nuthin 😄. Nah this is my gym top 

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8 minutes ago, gbyleveldt said:

I can pretty much taste the irony. Gorgeous George🤣 He is a big one though . Wow

Actually a big softy and was prancing around with 5 other little dogs. When you are this big and dominating you dont need to be aggressive, life is sweet. Anyway love your channel 👍 watched a couple and will watch the rest as well. All power to you matey for having the bottle, something I've been considering for a little while. I hope you do well, lets get you up to some big numbers subs. 

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1 hour ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

So you are the man to talk to about Seikos, cool. Its good to specialise, my forté is being a lazy good for nuthin 😄.

I wouldn't call myself an expert by any stretch of the imagination. It's just easier to find parts for Seikos than for the average swiss watch so that's what I gravitate towards. That Tissot was a classic example of what a typical swiss movement costs to repair vs what it's worth. It's doing pretty well video wise but outside of that it's still worth maybe $100-$150 after it was restored. A nicely restored popular Seiko is worth more and costs less to repair for the same effort (I'm talking divers here). The point may be moot as I don't sell any of the watches I get going again haha.

Lazy, nah, any guy that works with his hands the whole day is far from lazy. At the end of the day, you can stand back and see what you've made with those hands. I know you said it in jest but us "works with our hands" types are a dying breed. My son turned 18 now and he couldn't be bothered (nor can most of his friends) working with his hands. They all want the cushy jobs; I guess it's my fault for being soft with them. Whew, that went dark quick...

1 hour ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

Anyway love your channel 👍 watched a couple and will watch the rest as well. All power to you matey for having the bottle, something I've been considering for a little while. I hope you do well, lets get you up to some big numbers subs. 

Thank you very much Rich, I really do appreciate it.

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I really liked Alex's video on dressing your tweezers and screwdrivers and ordered a rolling screwdriver jig yesterday.

I'm not that enthused about having him walk me through the mechanical disassembly/re-assembly of an ST36 where there is (or hasn't been yet) ANY mention of lubrication. 

To be fair he's only put up 7 videos so far and they've been well done. If nothing else, I'm planning to dress my (brand new) tweezers and screwdrivers and practice picking stuff up.

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I suspect he will be dedicating a video solely to lubrication, hence why he hasn’t brought it up yet. I get the impression that he’s compartmentalising each subunit of a movement per video and focusing only on that. Would be a great resource as well down the line: “I’m battling with a balance, oh yes it was such and such video”. Easiest way to get to the important stuff, as opposed to skipping through an hour long video with every thing in it.

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1 hour ago, gbyleveldt said:

I suspect he will be dedicating a video solely to lubrication, hence why he hasn’t brought it up yet. I get the impression that he’s compartmentalising each subunit of a movement per video and focusing only on that. Would be a great resource as well down the line: “I’m battling with a balance, oh yes it was such and such video”. Easiest way to get to the important stuff, as opposed to skipping through an hour long video with every thing in it.

Just finished watching the 7s26/36 seiko 5 sports restoration, cracking video and the finished watch and end display made it look bloody gorgeous 👍. Need more subscribers matey a lot more.

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Thank you Rich! Those were my first ones so feeling my way in the dark then. I’m still sitting with a dilemma as to format. Do I talk and try and be informative (boring you to tears in the process). Or do I just keep my trap shut and get on with it? Looking at the analytics, it suggest people prefer me quiet. Which is fine as it’s less work. But then it’s no longer informative and only entertaining. Hmmmm

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    • Hi Fernando, read carefully what @eccentric59 wrote, it is the key to You problem. Lubricate the cannon pinion. Take care to understand what is it's function. When You set time, the train doesn't move, but only the cannon pinion moves. Put hte lever back in it's place, it has nothing to do with time setting
    • Hi fernando. Let us know how you get on.
    • OK, in You case You will assemble the movement with the line attached to the barrel and fusee and will  wind the line  entirely on the barrel after that. It is important when replacing the line to know the correct lenght of the line. The rule is that when line wound on the fudsee entirely, about 1/4 turn still to remain on the barrel. Yes, no tension. The ratchet is not placed yet, the spring in the barrel is complitelly unwound. At the end of the step the fusee is empty and the line is attached to it and strained perpendiculary to it, not on tangent. The escape wheel. Use whatever that will not damage anything. Yes, this is typing mistake, sorry. The word 'pendulum' here is not correct, You should use 'anchor' and yes, it is removed from the movement at this point, according my instruction 1 (Ihave used the word 'lever' there):   Ok, let sey the barrel arbour makes 6 full turns when winding the spring in the barrel from unwound to fully wound state of the spring. Let sey that the barrel makes 4.5 full turns when winding the clock from fully unwound (the line is on the barrel) to fully wound (the line is on the fusee) state. This means that You should not wind the spring in the barlel when adjusting the initial tension to more than 1.5 turns of the arbour of the barrel.  If You make 2 full turns, then when winding the clock, the barrel will be able to turn to only 4 turns, so the limiting device will not limit the rotation of the fusee arbour and You will be able to force the line much more than when the limiting device acts, also the power reserve will be less. Hope this is clear now... Yes, but again - not the pendulum, but the anchour.   About the loosing time... In this kind of escapement, the frequency pritty much depends on the torque. The higher torque - the highrer frequency. This is because this escapement forces the pendulum to oscillate significantly faster than it's own resonant fequency. The frequency depends on the 'depth' of the escapement too - the deeper escapement is, the lower the frequency, and the higher amplitude of pendulum oscillations. The heavier the pendulum is, the harder to the movement (the escapement torque) to force the pendulum to oscillate faster than it's own frequency. And in the end, the own pendulum frequency depends only on the pendulum lenght and a little on the suspension spring 'strenght' This are all the relations between all the factors. You can try to use the old spring (if it is not broken) and see if the clock will work faster with it. Yes, the old springs of fusee clocks sometimes give bigger torque than modern ones, no matter if they seem to be 'set' You can shorten the pendulum to achieve correct frequency. If the torque is reduced, but enough for the movement to work reliably,  then reduced torque will only lead to lessen the wear. The torque in fusee movements is more or less constant all the time, this is the function of the fusee. You can use the Clock Tuner  free app for android to adjust faster the clock rate. You will need to know the BPH of the movement, so count the teeth of the wheels and pinions and calculate the BPH
    • Hi! My bad. I meant to say that when the pallet fork is installed I cant move the wheels "using the crown in the setting position" Really in truly my number 3 was redundant and badly written (trying to explain myself went all wrong). I dismantling partially the watch (calendar, remontoir, Balance and Pallet fork). I think I would need to go that way...  Thanks for your comments...    
    • this is what happens if you don't fully do all of your research. I found the safe answer I found your exact caliber we got a mainspring number we got a price at a decent price for the original spring verified that the spring number at least on bestfit agrees with what we have so it was safe yes I did look in the GR catalog I had seen that 200 watch has a spring similar to what you perceive it should be. But to be honest I never looked at the 200 watch to see what its mainspring was. then the other amusement I went back to the bestfit online because if the 200 have the same spring I were to see that when I snipped out the image up above. Turns out they don't even show a 200 listing at all.  
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