Jump to content

Use of jeweling tool in adjustment of jewel endshakes


Recommended Posts

I have a few questions on the use of a (lever-type) jeweling tool in the adjustment of jewel endshakes, as I have never done this before.

1. If the endshake is too much or too little, how do you choose where to adjust the endshake? Do you adjust the endshake on the train bridge, or the main plate, or both? How do you decide which is the best?

2. When inserting the pusher into the spindle of a lever-type jeweling tool, such as a Favourite, is the best practice to take out the entire spindle from the tool frame to insert the pusher? And likewise, take out the entire spindle from the tool frame to remove the pusher? Or is it perfectly ok to insert or remove the pusher when the spindle is still inside the jeweling tool frame. Which way is safer/ best practice.

3. Is there an attachment to the base of the jeweling tool to hold the mainplate or bridges? I don’t seem to see any for sale, new or otherwise. Can I make one?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, ifibrin said:

1. If the endshake is too much or too little, how do you choose where to adjust the endshake? Do you adjust the endshake on the train bridge, or the main plate, or both? How do you decide which is the best?

I consider the interface of the part with adjacent ones, in the escapement for instance you want pallets to interact with  escape teeth at one end of the fork and at the other end fork horn isn't to rub on the roller table.   Once you do move the jewels, you ought to instal the parts back on the mainplate plus its bridge and test if the parts involved are doing what they are suppose to satisfaortrily. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Wow! Mr Wostep himself 🙂 Thanks for pointing us to this video.  
    • Did you ask the question on the group of how should I do this? On any type of special end Mainsprings and I words things that have protruding off the edges that need to go into holes or slots In the barrel there is an easy procedure. Yes I know it's another tool to purchase but watch repair is all about purchasing tools. You need a mainspring winder the mainspring into the winder you leave a little bit out you do not wind it all the way and like you would normal Swiss type spring. Click a little bit sticking out to stick that into the barrel with the rest of the winder which means it all has to fit you have to pick the right diameter you rotated around until your slot lines up with the protruding part of the mainspring. You then pushed that part of the mainspring in the slot hold it in place with like the back end of a tweezer or the biggest screwdriver you have any push the spring out. The very simple procedure if you understand what you need to do. Otherwise you can hand winding up in but that is generally frowned upon for a variety of reasons. That doesn't mean that it doesn't happen every single day right now someone on the plan is probably hand winding a mainspring it just can't have issues it's better if you could use a winder
    • A forgotten part of a horological history is what you're quoting. I don't have an exact time frame but somewhere in the 60s through the 70s there were a variety of solutions that you could have. One of them was called miracle lube and there are a variety of other names for them. I finally saw material safety sheets for one of them and basically it was mineral oil dissolved in the rinse the final rinse your cleaning that is. So the oils in the rinse it gets everywhere in its stride Larry action pulls the lubrication in to all the cracks crannies and under the plates but it's worked. Ms. very popular in high volume watch shops where there are doing literally hundreds of watches per week and they're doing M at a very bargain price because typically was wholesale work and go the jewelry store and jewelry store didn't care as long as it was cheap enough. For the most part all of those products are gone except they still have the clock one available. So if you're really desperate you could use something like this you get lubrication literally everywhere that it would evaporate and leave the oil in all the cracks and crannies. I assume because are still making the clock version there must be people out there purchasing it.
    • No that's definitely a bad attitude. Especially with American pocket watches the banking pins are movable and you should definitely move them leave them in some random place because you can what would be the consequences? Just to be technically correct that's not exactly a wostep handout. If you look carefully at the title which I think I changed after I downloaded it it's a combination of wostep and North Seattle community college As that's Where I down off their website. Which is why it's kind of a mixed up mess of things. But still it's good even if it is kind of a mess Then there's the problem with escapement terminology and time and wherever you're located or and a combination of all of us. If you look at various handouts on the escapement and I'll add in a couple more for you they have differing terminologies and they'll get obsessed with certain terminologies and stuff. The terminology becomes kinda Of amusing like so many things in watch repair there can be actually multiple names for the same part just depending upon where and when. But as you like handouts let's attach a few more. I usually think of the banking pins is there for Horn clearance only. But other people think of them as solutions to potential problems that they perceive they have or have not. Which is why typically on American pocket watches with movable banking pins they been moved.   Then related to these so-called wostep handout is this lecture. Yes a perfect example of what happens when you film a lecture given at AWCI convention the audio sucks. But it's an extremely good lecture he's a very good teacher is well worth your time and effort to try to make it through it.     Elgin watch company Escapement Terminology.PDF Escapement Detached Lever Escapement.PDF Escapement Elgin setting up the escapement.PDF
×
×
  • Create New...