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1970s Omega Speedmaster damaged


Watchguy2
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Greetings,

I've recently acquired a vintage Speedmaster that has some unfortunate damage to it. See a video of the damage at this link:

https://imgur.com/a/rGWQG4K

I'm struggling to see what's actually been damaged here, if it's part of the dial or something else (tension ring?). It's under the glass right on the edge of the dial (see image).

Would love to just know some more on this, what's exactly damaged, if it's an easy change (e.g just a replacement or fix)

Thank you.

Screenshot_20220515-214858_Gallery.jpg

20220515_214130.jpg

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5 minutes ago, Watchguy2 said:

Greetings,

I've recently acquired a vintage Speedmaster that has some unfortunate damage to it. See a video of the damage at this link:

https://imgur.com/a/rGWQG4K

I'm struggling to see what's actually been damaged here, if it's part of the dial or something else (tension ring?). It's under the glass right on the edge of the dial (see image).

Would love to just know some more on this, what's exactly damaged, if it's an easy change (e.g just a replacement or fix)

Thank you.

Screenshot_20220515-214858_Gallery.jpg

20220515_214130.jpg

From the second photo does look like a broken tension ring. Does the crystal feel secure ?

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Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

From the second photo does look like a broken tension ring. Does the crystal feel secure ?

Yep, feels secure!

What does this mean?

Edited by Watchguy2
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34 minutes ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

broken tension ring.

I'm not sure I've ever seen a broken tension ring? Now it could be a broken poly propylene or whatever the plastic gaskets are that holds the crystal in place they can disintegrate. The normal tension rings: the inside their metal and I don't think I've ever seen one go bad but this is watch repair everything is possible.

Then I didn't see any back pictures like a picture of the backside where we can get a serial number or a case number although usually case numbers inside the back but serial number would work I can look up how the crystal holes in place but I can't do it without a number.

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4 minutes ago, JohnR725 said:

I'm not sure I've ever seen a broken tension ring? Now it could be a broken poly propylene or whatever the plastic gaskets are that holds the crystal in place they can disintegrate. The normal tension rings: the inside their metal and I don't think I've ever seen one go bad but this is watch repair everything is possible.

Then I didn't see any back pictures like a picture of the backside where we can get a serial number or a case number although usually case numbers inside the back but serial number would work I can look up how the crystal holes in place but I can't do it without a number.

Thank you john. I do agree the tension rings i have come across have been of a mild type steel so are more inclined to bend as apposed to a hardened brittle steel that would fracture. So could this be of a non tension crystal type fitting ?

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15 minutes ago, JohnR725 said:

I'm not sure I've ever seen a broken tension ring? Now it could be a broken poly propylene or whatever the plastic gaskets are that holds the crystal in place they can disintegrate. The normal tension rings: the inside their metal and I don't think I've ever seen one go bad but this is watch repair everything is possible.

Then I didn't see any back pictures like a picture of the backside where we can get a serial number or a case number although usually case numbers inside the back but serial number would work I can look up how the crystal holes in place but I can't do it without a number.

No identifying numbers on the back besides the strap.

20220516_101158.jpg

20220516_101259.jpg

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1 hour ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

So could this be of a non tension crystal type fitting ?

Problem is I went back and looked at the pictures and it's really hard to tell what were seeing. Although if it was a plastic crystal it would have a tension ring. If it was some form of glass or worst-case sapphire because Sapphire would be astronomically expensive then there would be an outer Polly propylene ring holding the crystal in place typically.

But the best way to do an evaluation is to take the back off the size we would get the case back number from the inside. But taking the watch apart does bring up a minor problem like?

2 hours ago, Watchguy2 said:

've recently acquired a vintage Speedmaster that has some unfortunate damage to i

Recently acquired was it expensive? Casually one is looking for a crystal the seems to be an expensive watch I wouldn't really recommend it for your first watch repair. Even taking the movement out could be interesting if you've never done it before and Omega watches the parts are astronomically expensive if you can find them. As they have restrictions on who can purchase those parts.

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5 minutes ago, JohnR725 said:

Omega watches the parts are astronomically expensive if you can find them. As they have restrictions on who can purchase those parts.

Thank you for that information. I have been looking at ebay and drooled over an Omega as an idea for a future project when I have experience. Thank goodness I saw your comment.

Regards

Ross

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, JohnR725 said:

 

But the best way to do an evaluation is to take the back off the size we would get the case back number from the inside. But taking the watch apart does bring up a minor problem like?

Recently acquired was it expensive? Casually one is looking for a crystal the seems to be an expensive watch I wouldn't really recommend it for your first watch repair. Even taking the movement out could be interesting if you've never done it before and Omega watches the parts are astronomically expensive if you can find them. As they have restrictions on who can purchase those parts.

It was a gift and came as is. Is it something I could send off to get serviced and they can fix it then?

 

Dont know if I'm prepared to open it myself

Edited by Watchguy2
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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Watchguy2 said:

No identifying numbers on the back besides the strap.

20220516_101158.jpg

20220516_101259.jpg

You would maybe want to weight up the cost of having it repaired against leaving it as it is and just being careful having it around water as the broken seal tension ring ? will affect its water resistance. Tbh i would never have water near a vintage watch full stop. But as John says too expensive to try to repair yourself without any experience .

5 minutes ago, Watchguy2 said:

It was a gift and came as is. Is it something I could send off to get serviced and they can fix it then?

 

Dont know if I'm prepared to open it myself

I wouldnt open it yourself. Not without a good amount of learning and experience under your belt.

Edited by Neverenoughwatches
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11 minutes ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

You would maybe want to weight up the cost of having it repaired against leaving it as it is and just being careful having it around water as the broken seal tension ring ? will affect its water resistance. Tbh i would never have water near a vintage watch full stop. But as John says too expensive to try to repair yourself without any experience .

I wouldnt open it yourself. Not without a good amount of learning and experience under your belt.

Thanks for the information. At least I know it can be fixed if necessary. Will have a think

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9 hours ago, Watchguy2 said:

No identifying numbers on the back besides the strap.

 

The bracelet doesn't seem to match the watch, it seems far more modern. Do you know much of the watch’s history?

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5 hours ago, Watchguy2 said:

At least I know it can be fixed if necessary. Will have a think

Depending upon the country you live in you may have a Omega/Swatch group service center. I have a link below it talks about the servicing of you send the watch in it is completely restored the movements restored faulty components are replaced the case is stripped refinished everything is you basically get a brand-new watch back.  But then there is the problem this isn't a cheap watch and the servicing is not going to be cheap I used to think they had the price list on the website but I don't see it there probably because too many people had a heart attack and were unable to send their watch in. Although considering what you get and they have original parts it is typically a good deal it just isn't cheap

https://www.omegawatches.com/customer-service/interventions-and-prices

 

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If the crystal has been replaced with an aftermarket one the original ring could have been cut to reduce its diameter, an original crystal should have the Omega symbol in the middle.

Parts are availabel but pricey and you need a friendly watchmaker to get it for you.

Anilv

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2 hours ago, anilv said:

If the crystal has been replaced with an aftermarket one the original ring could have been cut to reduce its diameter, an original crystal should have the Omega symbol in the middle.

Parts are availabel but pricey and you need a friendly watchmaker to get it for you.

Anilv

A replacement crystal would come with its own ring wouldn't it? It's probably just a generic type that's too small. 

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1 hour ago, Plato said:

A replacement crystal would come with its own ring wouldn't it? It's probably just a generic type that's too small. 

The last Omega crystal I bought had a ring inside but that was for a seamaster not speedmaster,

Anilv

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, anilv said:

If the crystal has been replaced with an aftermarket one the original ring could have been cut to reduce its diameter, an original crystal should have the Omega symbol in the middle.

Parts are availabel but pricey and you need a friendly watchmaker to get it for you.

Anilv

Crystal is original. If I get it repaired, would they need to change that?

Edited by Watchguy2
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On 5/16/2022 at 1:16 AM, Watchguy2 said:

I've recently acquired a vintage Speedmaster

I don't suppose you've got specifications for your watch? Like what kind of movement is in that case for instance?

8 minutes ago, Watchguy2 said:

Crystal is original. If I get it repaired, would they need to change that?

All you have to do is take the old crystal out you would have to have the case number to get the proper Crystal. The crystal of this type is listed as a Plexiglas crystal with a black ring. You would just need a crystal press to the right type to push it in.

 

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16 hours ago, Watchguy2 said:

Crystal is original. If I get it repaired, would they need to change that?

Plastic crystals have a lot of stress and this will eventually show up as a lot of hairline fractures on the crystal. If you are saying you want to save the original I would recommend not bothering they are considered consumables. Get an original crystal installed by a proffessional is the best route. Not much difference in price to buying one from them and installing  it yourself.

Anilv

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