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Reapplying lacquer to brass


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I have lacquered many French carriage clock cases and I always have used a very soft flat artist brush. brush in one way only. You don't say what you are going to lacquer. You must make sure it is clean with no specks of dirt/dust or tiny hairs. It dries very quick the one I used. You most never touch the parts because if you do your print will show. Here is the one I used, its the clear one for brass.

https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/lacquers-rapid-drying

Edited by oldhippy
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In the title. Brass primarily.

I have tested several different methods, but I keep getting an orange peel result.

Looking at other clocks we have that are lacquered, the coating is flawless and I just don't know how that has been achieved?

I am wondering about the purchase as well of an airbrush

I have tried brushing as well with another varnish that I have and that did not test well either. It well could be my lack of experience.

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If you are getting orange peel I assume you are spraying your lacquer, yes.

Orange peel is the result of an incorrect spraying technique, often the result from too much distance between gun/airbrush and subject, so the paint starts drying before it hits the subject, or you are putting too heavy a coat of lacquer down and it's drying at different rates.

Try lighter coats with more dry time between coats, or try a less hot thinner so it slows the dry time a little.

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I have never used a spray. I remember I was told that it sometimes leaves spots and it is harder to get an even coating then it is to use a very soft brush. I asked for a photo because I was wondering if the part was clean and dirt might have given an orange colour. 

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Don't need a photo really, Just flat brass plate was where I was experimenting.

Now, as to the spraying side, we are not talking about something I am mixing up to spray. We are talking about spray can lacquer and I think that may be 90% of the problem.

I have a compressor already and the thought of a professional airbrush versus the production line plastic nozzles on spray cans, or buying decent lacquer as @oldhippyhas shown above, though I am not sure if I can even get that brand here, is probably the direction that I will have to take.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 5/14/2022 at 9:15 AM, Paul80 said:

If you are getting orange peel I assume you are spraying your lacquer, yes.

Orange peel is the result of an incorrect spraying technique, often the result from too much distance between gun/airbrush and subject, so the paint starts drying before it hits the subject, or you are putting too heavy a coat of lacquer down and it's drying at different rates.

Try lighter coats with more dry time between coats, or try a less hot thinner so it slows the dry time a little.

Nothing wrong with your spelling better then mine, to me it's there problem i keeping having to go to google😂

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