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zenon

Omega De Ville ?560? With 1002 Movement?

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Hi,

 

(The roscopf here: http://www.watchrepairtalk.com/topic/2165-newbie-roscopf-puzzle/is on back burner awaiting materials).

 

I purchased today on auction Omega Automatic De Ville. I am confused by the numberings. It ought to have the 560 number on movement instead there is number 1002. I searched on Omega database these numbers and found that the 1002 movement in gilded style should have 166.0051 case instead there is 166.051. How come the differences?

 

Of course I had to get the tough one (opening and taking movement out! :)) Finally got it opened. As you see the case had a hard life and the gilding (40 microns!) is damaged and even peels off in places - sad. Otherwise I think it is very pretty watch. Runs well but needs complete service.

 

post-335-0-81679400-1432024644_thumb.jpg

 

Below you can see the numbers 1002 on the movement and 166.051 on the case. The more I am looking at watches the more confusion there is with the numbers... :)

 

post-335-0-33183800-1432024712_thumb.jpg

 

So:

 

1. Is there place where I can find (I looked a fair bit already) a hm... new replacement case for this Omega De Ville? Can the case be changed from gilded into stainless?

 

2. Is the servicing of this 560 very complex to do? Any special advice from those in the know here? I am reasonably brave to do it.

 

 

Regards

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Omega often do this re case number.  They add an extra 0 as you have found. I have a 165-003 case (on watch) but omega refer to this as 165-0003.  Maybe they are now using a later number system because they needed more digits for later models ! 

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Thanks for your answers. I thought that I might be going mad by noticing these different numbers. :D

 

I will need to do the cleaning by hand cause no cleaning machine yet.

 

After years of wearing quartz Tissot I will have nice, 'proper', traditional watch for adults. Looking forward to this.

 

Thank you

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When Omega do service cases they usually add a 0 to the reference number . Like speedmaster cases 145.012 .That service case is  a 145.0012 . So if you have a omega watch with an extra number it's probebly has had the case changed at some time . Omega only list one version in the database but their could be more versions available like SS 

 

1 . You could do that but you have to change the dial and hands also  . 

Edited by rogart63

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When Omega do service cases they usually add a 0 to the reference number . Like speedmaster cases 145.012 .That service case is  a 145.0012 . So if you have a omega watch with an extra number it's probebly has had the case changed at some time . Omega only list one version in the database but their could be more versions available like SS 

 

1 . You could do that but you have to change the dial and hands also  . 

If we talk about numbers then the story goes:

 

There is no extra zero '0' on the case (see above). I am wandering about the non standard numbers that appear on watches.

 

The caliber seems to be 1002 (even if the face says Omega, Automatic Deville). The case is stamped inside:

 

ACIER INOXYDABLE

in triangle:

      Ω

  OMEGA

WATCH CO

 

under triangle

 

FAB. SUISSE

SWISS MADE

 

166.051

 

in domed box;

CB

 

SCRIBED:

 

87578

in group: 2035

               BWC

               186

 

 

078071

 

 

PLAQUE OR G

40 MICRONS

 

outside of case (bottom): WATERPROOF

                                         166 051 TOOL 107

 

Any help in deciphering these will be very, very helpful - I am sure not just for me. :-)

 

Regards

Edited by zenon

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Okey . At first it.s Acier inox....  Meaning it's stainless steel . 

And the CB is the casemaker La Centrale Boites in Bienne .

And the reference numbers actually is a code for what the case is http://www.old-omegas.com/omrefcod.html

The other numbers i think is the pic code discribe here http://www.chronomaddox.com/omega_pic.html

The last number tool 107 is the Omega crystal tool for removing the crystal . 

078071 is a watchmaker that has serviced the movement at some time .

Edited by rogart63

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Thank you all for your answers. Very helpful. I just wander how many stories is there hidden in all those olde watches out there? I think that each old watch holds a little bit of a attending watchmaker's soul locked inside its case. :-) That is why we must be very gentle with them.

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Okey . At first it.s Acier inox....  Meaning it's stainless steel . 

And the CB is the casemaker La Centrale Boites in Bienne .

And the reference numbers actually is a code for what the case is http://www.old-omegas.com/omrefcod.html

The other numbers i think is the pic code discribe here http://www.chronomaddox.com/omega_pic.html

The last number tool 107 is the Omega crystal tool for removing the crystal . 

078071 is a watchmaker that has serviced the movement at some time .

Thank for the links rogart63 very valuable. A bit more of the mystery solved. :-)

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