Jump to content

Seiko 8f32 perpetual calendar


Recommended Posts

The Seiko 8F32 line is one which seemed attractive to me, and as soon as I found several models on the shopping site (big A shall we say), I started acquiring a few models, but only after I watched Mark's tutorial on setting them. That was so helpful and entertaining, and satisfying to do that procedure myself - unlike the unfortunate cases of owners who placed themselves at the mercy of uninformed repair people. I only regret not buying more of them before they seemed to disappear from the "common" market, and only seem available on the "bay" or from other far-away sellers. 

The issue I have is that the three models I have do not keep time as per the claimed 20 s/y rate of accuracy. They seemed to run rather fast, maybe 1 or 2 seconds per week. The instructions do say to wear them about 12 hours per day, but I thought these would perform better than that, given that I have examples of quartz movements by Ronda and Miyota which seem to be like having "WWV on your wrist."  So that brings me to the question I would like to get an answer to:

First, I had found a piece of a technical document, obviously meant for service technicians or the like, which provided a procedure for regulating the 8F32 to +/- 0.056 s/d, in steps of 0.008 s/d.  This is accomplished by pulling the crown out two clicks, pushing it in just one click, waiting 5 seconds, then pulling it back out to the last click again. The calendar wheel then steps to the current regulation setting, which should be "8" on a movement as normally found, which represents "0" or a neutral setting. The 8 shows for three seconds, then the watch moves the date wheel to position 1 for three seconds, then 2 for another pause, and up the ladder to a maximum of 15, waiting for you at any time to push the crown back in to lock in your desired adjustment. These positions represent, according to the document, +0.056 s/d at position 1, +0.048 s/d at position 2, and so on, moving by 0.008 s/d until reaching -0.056 s/d at position 15. 

The question is firstly, where did this document go, as I cannot for the life of me pull it up again, seemingly having disappeared from the internet!  And secondly, as even position 15 seems unable to slow my movements down appreciably, do these movements simply age-out and become inaccurate after 10 or 15 years or so, to the point that no "regulation" will bring them back in line? 

If this post belongs in one devoted to quartz movements, please redirect me there, but I consider it a little adventure in problem-solving and the quenching of a burning curiosity. Thanks to anyone who can offer some insight - regards, Glenn (Watchhound)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Watchhound said:

The question is firstly, where did this document go, as I cannot for the life of me pull it up again, seemingly having disappeared from the internet!

Maybe you're referring to some '3rd party' document, of which there can be many, they do nothing but tell in more and different words what the service manual explains, here attached.

4F32A_8F32A_33A_35A.pdf

 

Or you can watch the excellent video by our Host Mark Lovick to the same effect.

 

4 hours ago, Watchhound said:

do these movements simply age-out and become inaccurate after 10 or 15 years or so

Not just that mov.t but all quartz watches may suffer of crystal aging which eventually slows them down. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_oscillator#Aging

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you, JDM, for your quick and detailed reply. I still don't see what I was referring to in the manual or Mark's video, as this is a sort of hidden feature of the movement, and it really does work, I am hoping someone will try it and verify it. I really do appreciate your link to quartz movements, and hope that this aging effect will help the 8F32s I have to finally slow down. I am really impressed at the helpfulness and friendliness of you and your fellow members. Thanks again

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/24/2022 at 12:34 PM, Watchhound said:

I still don't see what I was referring to in the manual or Mark's video, as this is a sort of hidden feature of the movement, and it really does work,

I'm sorry, I had read with brain disconnected and didn't understood what you were talking about. I never seen that mentioned anywhere, tried it on my watch (I use it almost every day) and it behaves exactly as you described. I will apply a correction the next time that it deviates too much. Then  I briefly searched the Internet and the only references I found was that at some point Seiko wanted GPB95 to 'restore accuracy' on one of these watches, presumably applying this procedure. Looks like a well kept secret, thank you very much for sharing it here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fascinating acting feature. I like it.

I am surprised that nobody designed a system using an RF link to calibrate the watch. Probably did, but before Bluetooth and smart phones it was cost prohibitive. The popular solution was to calibrate off of WWV in the US. Seiko approach is a brilliant compromise. Nowadays, if we want to know the precise time we use our smart phone...and we Re still late to meetings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, right?! Appreciate the validation, it is just a curiosity but I can't help noticing how timepieces run, since time standards are so available to us, also maybe it is a touch of OCD, since we are not talking about moon landings, but merely our day-to-day lives. Thanks again for your replies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Even after thorough cleaning unfortunately the issue persists. I have made sure that all wheels are perfectly clean, no teeth are chipped, no gunk is left built up on them etc. yet the issue is not gone. When reassembling the movement I of course checked if the wheel train moves freely as that was the suspected cause of the issue before. And the intersting thing is - it does - but only in the "wrong" direction. Driving the wheeltrain by turning the mainspring barrel in the opposite direction as it would turn in normal operation, all wheels spin freely, and continue spinning for a few moments even after I stop providing power by hand. They behave the way I'm used to and have seen with other wheels before. However: When I apply torque in the opposite direction, the power delivery througout the train is not smooth or continuous. While it does turn, there are stages of increased resistance in the train. In addition to this, you can hear a slight "rubbing" sound whenever the trian passes by this point of increased resistance. The sound, to me, is more indicative of a surface rubbing on another surface, rather than the teeth of two wheels getting stuck within each other. Installing the click and putting a wind in the mainspring confirms this same issue, it does unwind and all wheels are powered, yet when the power reserve approaches depletion, it doesn't have enough power to push the wheeltrain past this point of friction. The slightest bump on any of the wheels will free the train, make it spin for however many rotations and then get stuck in the same way. You can do this several times before the power is actually completely depleted. This has really left me dumbfounded. I have inspected all of the wheels, pivots, teeth etc. on the entire wheel train and can't find any traces of dirt, any bent teeth or any warped or out of plane wheels. Besides: If one of the wheels was bent and rubbing up against some other part of the movement during a rotation, shouldn't it be doing this regardless of the direction of the rotation? This is supremely confusing to me and I can't figure out for the life of me why there is increased friction in only ONE direction and not the other. Installing the balance yielded the same result as before the disassembly: the watch runs great for about 50 seconds and then get's stuck when the wheel train get's bogged down. I mentioned earlier that there is a periodic scraping noise that can be heard when the gear train turns fast, this noise is not present when turning the train the opposiste direction. Does anyone have any ideas about which parts of the movement I can check for rubbing? I found no signs of wear or scraping on any of the bridges etc. so what would cause this periodic friction in one direction but not the other? I am very much a novice and have never dealt with such an issue before so I would love to hear what you people think about this. Thanks.
    • For me the second site has been hacked. 
    • https://www.mikrolisk.de/show.php?site=280&suchwort=Tschuy-Vogt&searchWhere=all#sucheMarker Wierd the first link didn't work.  They used other manufacturers movements, like most watch companies.  The watch you are asking about has this movement  https://calibercorner.com/ronda-caliber-3540-d/
    • Is there a way to interpret that?  I assume that is information on the watch?  Thanks!
×
×
  • Create New...