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Seiko 7S26 / NH26 - Rectangular Diafix cap jewels spring


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2 hours ago, kd8tzc said:

Okay, so I am still confused here.  You are saying that if I am not comfortable removing the shock spring from the Seiko, then turn the balance wheel assembly over, and move the wheel out of the way stretching the spring (gently)?  The problem that I am seeing is that it sure doesn't leave a whole lot of room to get the oilier between the coils of the balance wheel springs so I can get it to the hole for the pivot.  Maybe I am being too cautious of how far I stretch the spring.

It can be done this way but it is risky . I often do this to adjust for beat error, as that can be a trial and error process to get it somewhere near. Removing the balance from the cock will simplify things and give you room if you wanted to oil from underneath. Personally i  always want to disassemble the jewel setting to make sure everything was clean in there. That does come with practice though as is something you would want to work towards

4 minutes ago, kd8tzc said:

Okay... well I will need to find some scrap Seiko movements then as all I have currently are the ones that are in my watches that I wear.

So completely detach the hair spring from balance wheel and cock? 

 

4 minutes ago, kd8tzc said:

Okay... well I will need to find some scrap Seiko movements then as all I have currently are the ones that are in my watches that I wear.

So completely detach the hair spring from balance wheel and cock? 

No the balance which would be the staff the balance wheel and the hairspring inc. Its attached components. You are just releasing the stud from cock to do this 

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  • 1 month later...

Hello everyone, I came across this tutorial while looking on the net for parts for an NH36. I'm just an amateur and rather a beginner (and French. Forgive me my English) but my level today allows me to disassemble / reassemble a movement, clean it, oil it, and finally adjust it. I mainly work on NH36, ETA 2836 and Miyota 8200 (watch mod). My first attempts with these small parts were catastrophic, losing them most of the time! Also not having tons of money to buy tons of expensive tools, I make them as much as possible. Specifically for these parts, I made a small box out of plexigass to avoid losing them if they jump out and a small tool which makes the operation incredibly easy in few secondes without loosing spring. If it can help newbies like me, I would appreciate it.

 

 

IMG_2631.thumb.jpg.d9fe4b9cd26268372cb59e3346d716f6.jpgIMG_2632.thumb.jpg.40f8388a486a30b5d17fc13c9a812420.jpgIMG_2634.thumb.jpg.7ef155310e9dec6060fc085ddbf5f5c5.jpgIMG_2635.thumb.jpg.123fad3db8505caa02e9b3e215a5c9c5.jpg. If

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 5/8/2023 at 12:54 PM, flannel77 said:

I can't post video here.

If you want, give me your email on MP and I will send you a little video I made this morning for you.

 If you can post on you tube, give us the link to your vid so we  can all see the mess you made. lol.

Hope this  is just to show how to use the tool and box,  but you don't really remove shock springs with balance attached to the cock, do you? 

Seperate the balance so it wont get damaged in case hand slips. 

Slip proof approach.

Rgds

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2 hours ago, Nucejoe said:

Hope this  is just to show how to use the tool and box,  but you don't really remove shock springs with balance attached to the cock, do you? 

What is wrong with removing a non captive spring on a Seiko balance whilst in situ? Probably safer to remove the cap on the mainplate first, so you don't damage the staffs or caps by putting too much pressure on the pegwood tool. Here's video of how easy it is. 

 

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7 minutes ago, Jon said:

What is wrong with removing a non captive spring on a Seiko balance whilst in situ? Probably safer to remove the cap on the mainplate first, so you don't damage the staffs or caps by putting too much pressure on the pegwood tool. Here's video of how easy it is. 

 

Hi Jon, 

The vid didn't open for lack of fast vpn on my device.

The oscilator is in harms way as shown in flannel picture, one slip of hand  and he needs a new replacement. 

I detach the oscilator from the cock so it isn't there to get damaged and when seperated I have a chance to give a good clean.

Rgds

 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, tomh207 said:

Maybe I have misunderstood something, why would you remove the balance complete to clean and oil a cap jewel?

 

Tom

Are you guys putting me on? 

I am not saying  that seperating balance complete and cock facilitates removal of cap stones, rather if flannel77  seperates and keep the balance complete out of harms way ( say in a box)  he  can't damage the it in case  his pegging tool slips , because the balance is  not there to get damaged, its far away from the crime secene safe  in a box.

Pegging tool, screw drivers can slip as flannel77 shows, thus easily damage the balance.

😁🙃🤠

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello everyone, I'm not sure I translate what you write correctly. I made a video which is not famous because I don't really have what it takes. From there my message took a little time to be validated by a Moderator and I haven't come back here since.

So, I do exactly the same way as on the video that was posted with just in addition my little "anti-loss" plexiglass box that I use as soon as I fear that a part could jump in a distant galaxy ! 🙂

Contrary to the photos which were only there to show the "principle", obviously I temporarily fix the movement holder to the table with rodico so that it does not move otherwise nothing can be done of course !

All this works perfectly for me in complete safety and without risk of loss. Exactly as on the video, I perform this operation when the movement is completely disassembled.

If I understand correctly, I believe that when you touch a movement there will always be a risk of damaging it, even for an excellent watchmaker, right ? The risk becomes smaller and smaller the better you get, but it will always exist, in my opinion. When I was a complete beginner and wanted to learn, I broke a few, lost parts, and I knew the risk was great. But that's also how I learned from my mistakes and it hasn't happened to me for a while now, even if the risk is still there !

 

Besides, I watched hundreds of videos on youtube to learn and I've never seen a watchmaker do anything differently or anything other than what I do or what the video shows.

Am I missing something?

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1 hour ago, flannel77 said:

Hello everyone, I'm not sure I translate what you write correctly. I made a video which is not famous because I don't really have what it takes. From there my message took a little time to be validated by a Moderator and I haven't come back here since.

So, I do exactly the same way as on the video that was posted with just in addition my little "anti-loss" plexiglass box that I use as soon as I fear that a part could jump in a distant galaxy ! 🙂

Contrary to the photos which were only there to show the "principle", obviously I temporarily fix the movement holder to the table with rodico so that it does not move otherwise nothing can be done of course !

All this works perfectly for me in complete safety and without risk of loss. Exactly as on the video, I perform this operation when the movement is completely disassembled.

If I understand correctly, I believe that when you touch a movement there will always be a risk of damaging it, even for an excellent watchmaker, right ? The risk becomes smaller and smaller the better you get, but it will always exist, in my opinion. When I was a complete beginner and wanted to learn, I broke a few, lost parts, and I knew the risk was great. But that's also how I learned from my mistakes and it hasn't happened to me for a while now, even if the risk is still there !

 

Besides, I watched hundreds of videos on youtube to learn and I've never seen a watchmaker do anything differently or anything other than what I do or what the video shows.

Am I missing something?

No i don't think you are Flannel, it was a very good post you made and a good added tip with the plexiglass to prevent loss 👍.  Basic ideas and techniques are all we should really need, i dont feel the need to have from a post or provide to a post every little detail. We are not small children that need to be spoon fed, the rest we should be able to figure out for ourselves by trying the technique ourselves and honing the details ourselves. You crack on Flannel and keep posting ideas. 

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20 hours ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

No i don't think you are Flannel, it was a very good post you made and a good added tip with the plexiglass to prevent loss 👍.  Basic ideas and techniques are all we should really need, i dont feel the need to have from a post or provide to a post every little detail. We are not small children that need to be spoon fed, the rest we should be able to figure out for ourselves by trying the technique ourselves and honing the details ourselves. You crack on Flannel and keep posting ideas. 

Thank you for your answer 👍

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 1/28/2022 at 1:34 PM, MaGa said:

Hi All, 

in my first attempt of lubricating the jewels and lowering down agin the spring, i mess it up. The spring literally disappeared, I'm not sure where wanted to fly :).
Where i can source this diafix from? Anyone can help is super much appreciated. Thanks 

Screenshot 2022-01-28 at 11.31.04.png

This may help

 

7S26A_7S36A.pdf

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On 1/28/2022 at 1:34 PM, MaGa said:

Hi All, 

in my first attempt of lubricating the jewels and lowering down agin the spring, i mess it up. The spring literally disappeared, I'm not sure where wanted to fly :).
Where i can source this diafix from? Anyone can help is super much appreciated. Thanks 

Screenshot 2022-01-28 at 11.31.04.png

  These springs numbered 014577 , they describe by seiko as SHOCK ABSOSBING SPRING .

 

20230626_001638.jpg

20230626_001654.jpg

Edited by dave74
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