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Vintage 10 rubis movement: Cannon pinion disassembly


Tino
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Hi,

I'm trying to work on an old movement that belongs to a vintage pocket watch. I couldn't find the reference of the movement but I've attached some pictures of the top and bottom plates. I'm a bit stuck on how to remove the cannon pinion. On more recent movements I would usually simply remove it from the bottom plate by using a pair of tweezers or a cannon pinion remover tool to pull it out. In this case I cannot manage to do it. I'm reluctant of forcing it and risking breaking the arbor. I found some information that on some old movements you may have to tap the top of the arbor but not having any experience on that I'm a bit hesitant. Would you have an tips/idea of how to proceed?

Thanks !

cannonPinion_BottomPlate.jpg

CenterWheel_TopPlate.jpg

top_plate.jpg

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Hi  I believe from other posts that tapping it out is the correct way.    I would be inclined to make a sliding punch. Hollow brass rod that fits snugly over the canon pinion and another brass punch that fits in the hollow rod/guide. Being brass it wont damage the pinion  surface and the guide rod will ensure a srtaght impact so no chance of bending the pinion either.

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Thank you so much watchweasol ! I didn't have the brass rod and tube to make a proper sliding punch but I've ordered the materials for next time. I ended up using the pin part of a Bergeon 6767 tool that was a good fit. I've added photos for reference although I would definitely recommend making a sliding punch for safety.

Cannon Pinion removed.jpg

Tool.jpg

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