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A Seiko shows strange behavior


UhrTobi
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Hello,

I'm new here since a views hours and there is already my first problem I'm not able to solve. I did my first practice on a Seiko 7S26C movement. It is from a watch of a verry good friend. He was verry unsatisfied with its performance and told me, that the watch goes some times to fast, other times to slow. A timegrapher analytics shows this, too. In the same orientation the watch fluctuates between ca. +25s/day and -30s/day within a view minutes without any disturbance from outside. It had got a verry low amplitude of about 156°. He gave it to me just to practice. But now I have a strong motivation to fix the problem. I dissassembled it following Marks verry helpfull videos on youtube, cleaned and lubricated it and put it together two times. It still works nevertheless 😄. And the amplitude is now sometimes over 200° but suddenly it goes back to 180°. I could regulated the beat error down to ca. 0.1ms and it goes to max. 0.6ms depending on orientation. But the amplitude is still not stable and the accuracy is still fluctuating. The hair spring looks good ans all bearings seems to be clean. And so I can't guess, what the problem is. I would be verry glad if someone could give me some assotiations how I could fix the problem.

Many thanks an best regards🙂

Tobi

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I can generate an FFT on my scope.

So was my plan, too😉

I did some tests this eavening. At first I have had a look from side over the plain of the hair spring. There is a lot of space up to it's bridge, this was verry goot to see. However down to the balance it was verry hard to see anything because of the edge of the balance wheel. So I pushed the spring down verry softly and it moved down above the two spokes of the balance. So I don't think, the hair spring would scratch on brindge or hair spring.

But one thing I could see. The hair spring seems to be asymetric. I dissasebled it and took a photo through my microskop (see below). Is this normal or a deformation? I don't know...

Also I builded in both alternative balance-units and still the problem was the same in each case.

hair spring.jpeg

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10 hours ago, JohnR725 said:

Here's a question the ask everyone that's helping you today ask how many of us have a spectrum analyzer?

Anyone with a computer if they want it.  There is plenty of free software that can run on basically any computer that can act as a spectrum analyzer.  I was inspired by the previously mentioned signature analysis paper to add the kind of plot they used in the paper to tg-timer, which is even better than what you get with a basic spectrum analyzer or FFT mode on a scope.  So anyone who wants these tools can have them for less than the cost of nice pair of tweezers.

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9 hours ago, UhrTobi said:

Also I builded in both alternative balance-units and still the problem was the same in each case.

So swapping balance wheels didn't solve your problem? When you swap the balance wheel did you swap the entire balance wheel with bridge or just the balance wheel? Then did you check the balance jewels make sure that they were put back together correctly? Then yes it's really hard to see if the end stone is facing the correct direction as I think I mentioned hopefully one side is flat one side is domed that side goes out.

9 hours ago, UhrTobi said:

But one thing I could see. The hair spring seems to be asymetric. I dissasebled it and took a photo through my microskop (see below). Is this normal or a deformation? I don't know...

Compared to the other springs we sometimes see on this group Yours looks perfect that yes it's not centered. But is not the problem you're having because of it's a problem you're having that everybody in the group would be having the same problem.

5 hours ago, xyzzy said:

There is plenty of free software that can run on basically any computer that can act as a spectrum analyzer. 

I suppose it's my fault I didn't ask the right question? How many people on the group are currently using their spectrum analyzer to troubleshoot their watch problems? Then how many of those people that are using it find its superior to visually looking at the watch and trying to figure out how to fix the problems the old-fashioned way? hen the most important question of wall is since it appears to be the superior way to troubleshoot a watch explained the original person who has an spectrum analyzer how that analyzes watch and figure out what the problem is?

 

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11 minutes ago, JohnR725 said:

Then yes it's really hard to see if the end stone is facing the correct direction

One way is to look with the loupe, another place what you think is round up, very gently let the tip of pegwood on stone, if round up the stone will not tilt or move. Be aware that is one of the countless way to  loose the stone, so do that only on the bench mat that has gripping but if that happens, darken the room and use an UV flashlight.

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When you swap the balance wheel did you swap the entire balance wheel with bridge or just the balance wheel? ...

Yes, I changed the hole unit with bridge - changing the wheel is much to complicate for me at this time. I am brave but I also know my limits 😉. I cleaned the endstones, too, oiled it (with a tiny drop) and set it back ceartainly with the flat side to the axis. I checkt the correct possition on my microscope on both sides. 

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Compared to the other springs we sometimes see on this group Yours looks perfect that yes it's not centered. But is not the problem you're having because of it's a problem you're having that everybody in the group would be having the same problem.

Ok, thank you - good to know!

I guess, I will try something different - I don't know if it will work. My plan is to extract all wheels wich are not necessary for moving the balance and check for the amplitude geting higher and mor stable. If so, I would set back one wheel after an other, checking each time the movement. I can't say if it will work, but is there something that would advise me against it or is that a possible way to go?

 

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One way is to look with the loupe, another place what you think is round up, very gently let the tip of pegwood on stone, if round up the stone will not tilt or move. Be aware that is one of the countless way to  loose the stone, so do that only on the bench mat that has gripping but if that happens, darken the room and use an UV flashlight.

I did this so exactly, when ever I cleant the endstones. They are all fixed and centered and looks with their falt site in direction of wheels. 

Looking for a rubin using an UV source is a verry good idea! I did not lost any, but never say never😄

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14 hours ago, UhrTobi said:

My plan is to extract all wheels wich are not necessary for moving the balance and check for the amplitude geting higher and mor stable. If so, I would set back one wheel after an other, checking each time the movement.

I think that's an overkill. The standard way to check if the train is free is observing how it behaves with very little power, wind the barrel just a tiny bit observer how power is discharged? Does it stop slowly and gradually or it stops then  starts again at the lightest touch? Generally there can be a small counter-rotation of the escape wheel at the very end, but in fact there are perfectly fine Seiko mov.ts that do not do that at all. Seiko is a little bit different in many subtle aspects, I believe that is because it's more optimized and more sensible to the slightest wear or manufacturing imperfection. It will keep running, but not so precisely as it should. Most watchmakers will not spend even little time in repairing these, considering that a direct replacement NH36 that manual wind and hacka cost a little more than EUR 30.

 

14 hours ago, UhrTobi said:

But one thing I could see. The hair spring seems to be asymetric.

Slightly, but as mentioned it's good enough, is not that causes the major amplitude. All Seiko hairsprings in this class tend to do that with time, the space between the outer coils becomes narrower at the point opposite the end stud. That can be corrected, but is difficult for a beginner, the most common result is the hairspring being ruined for good.

 

14 hours ago, UhrTobi said:

I disassembled it and took a photo through my microskop (see below).

A next time take pictures with the mat as background. Also, the best way to judge the hairspring is with the balance installed, and even better when is running, as one can see if it "breaths" acceptably, and how it moves in the regulator.

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I think that's an overkill....

Thats right, but I think it's a hobby - and think of its definition: hobby is to achieve the smallest effect with the greatest possible effort 😉

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The standard way to check ...

I will try this, thanks 🙂

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Slightly, but as mentioned it's good enough, is not that causes the major amplitude...

Ok, I will leave it in that state.

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A next time take pictures with the mat as background. Also, the best way to judge the hairspring is with the balance installed, and even better when is running, as one can see if it "breaths" acceptably, and how it moves in the regulator.

Ok, I will do so 🙂

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On 1/11/2022 at 11:31 AM, UhrTobi said:

I forgot: I cleaned the main spring to and brought it back to its barrel  - I hope, I did it not such bad

 

16 hours ago, UhrTobi said:

oiled it!) the amplitude becoms a little higher

Too many problems?

Your watch by the way probably has more than one problem which in itself presents a problem.

Then there's the other problem you're new to watch repair can we assume we are doing things correctly?

Lubrication is really interesting you can get some really interesting effects if you try really hard to do it wrong. Except your new and what exactly is right and wrong?

Could you give us a list of the lubrication's you using?

Then the mainspring barrel did you use any lubrication here?

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5 hours ago, UhrTobi said:

I guess, I will try something different - I don't know if it will work. My plan is to extract all wheels wich are not necessary for moving the balance and check for the amplitude geting higher and mor stable. If so, I would set back one wheel after an other, checking each time the movement. I can't say if it will work, but is there something that would advise me against it or is that a possible way to go?

Did you check for backspin when you service the watch?

With no power on the watch remove the balance wheel in the pallet fork. Then wind the watch and is the gear train jump to life the instant you wind it or does it take a little bit of pressure from the mainspring before it takes off. Then this is somewhat of a subjective thing. So basically you're not going to have an instantaneous wind the mainspring and the trains spins but you shouldn't have to wind a lot to have the trains start to spin. Another would you want to see if the gear train is nice and free.

Then there is something called backspin not all watches have this. If the gear train is spinning but preferably not at warp speed it's bad the spin anything a watch at warp speed and have it accidentally stop. So with the gear train spinning nicely as your winding it because there's no fork to hold it in place stop winding. Book very very carefully at the escape wheel on a lot of watches the momentum of the train will go past the end of the mainspring wind the mainspring a little bit back words and the gear train will then stop and actually spin backwards for just a moment you'll see it in the escape wheel. That's usually a sign not always unfortunately they are train is really free.

The problem of the Seiko is it's hard to see all the wheels but if you had some really fine probe you could also go in and gently lift up and down each the wheels and make sure they are proper end shake in other words they have to have some end shake you don't want any the wheels binding up

5 hours ago, UhrTobi said:

Yes, I changed the hole unit with bridge - changing the wheel is much to complicate for me at this time. I am brave but I also know my limits 😉. I cleaned the endstones, too, oiled it (with a tiny drop) and set it back ceartainly with the flat side to the axis. I checkt the correct possition on my microscope on both sides. 

When you are swapping almost balance wheels was the dial-up and dial down amplitude exactly the same as the previous balance wheel?

 

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Your watch by the way probably has more than one problem which in itself presents a problem.

I think so, too. Hope I will fix it some day🙃

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Could you give us a list of the lubrication's you using?

I took a photo of my oiling equipment. The oil bowl and the oilers are home made.

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Then the mainspring barrel did you use any lubrication here?

Yes, I did. After extracting the spring I cleaned it with a optic-paper and do some little lubrication on the edge of barrel. Than I lubricated it with this by spreading the B52 material whith plastic gloves verry sparing.

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Did you check for backspin when you service the watch?

No, I did not. But I do now like you suggest. Thanks for the instructions 🙂

Without the fork all wheels are moving without stopping and restarting. The velocity goes down constantly until it stops finaly. Without click spring I can move the escape wheel backwards with out any problems by winding the mainspring backwards without lagging. I hope I did this in the right way.OilingEquipment.thumb.jpeg.784ae206c86688831ec59cd50d398cf5.jpeg

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58 minutes ago, UhrTobi said:

Than I lubricated it with this by spreading the B52 material whith plastic gloves verry sparing.

Interesting? I usually think of this grease as setting parts I think you're the first that I know of this using it on the mainspring. I'll have to look up the specifications and see if it says it's for that. On modern mainspring is no lubrication is normally required on the spring itself as it's supposed to have? It's supposed to be either magically lubricates itself or it has some sort of dry Teflon lubrication know the package does not save magical but I just feel like using the term right now so basically a very light lubrication or no lubrication on the mainspring itself. Unless it's an ancient blued steel spring but even then it shouldn't be something really sticky.

Then what did you use for your breaking grease? Somebody else will probably tell you what breaking grease is otherwise a link you ponder what that's for as I believe this is an automatic watch isn't it?

 

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4 hours ago, JohnR725 said:

Interesting? I usually think of this grease as setting parts I think you're the first that I know of this using it on the mainspring. I'll have to look up the specifications and see if it says it's for that. On modern mainspring is no lubrication is normally required on the spring itself as it's supposed to have? It's supposed to be either magically lubricates itself or it has some sort of dry Teflon lubrication know the package does not save magical but I just feel like using the term right now so basically a very light lubrication or no lubrication on the mainspring itself. Unless it's an ancient blued steel spring but even then it shouldn't be something really sticky.

Then what did you use for your breaking grease? Somebody else will probably tell you what breaking grease is otherwise a link you ponder what that's for as I believe this is an automatic watch isn't it?

 

 

In at least one of Mark's videos, he demonstrates oiling a mainspring in that way. And then disposes of his fouled finger cots. 

This was after cleaning the mainspring and barrel, so *some lubrication should probably be applied. I haven't read through the long thread in this forum about different methods. 

This is in fact an automatic, so braking grease is preferred on the walls of the barrel. But i think without it, the problem will be low reserve time due to slipping, but not a lack of power. 

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5 hours ago, TimpanogosSlim said:

This is in fact an automatic, so braking grease is preferred on the walls of the barrel. But i think without it, the problem will be low reserve time due to slipping, but not a lack of power. 

Seiko barrels are sealed not meant to be opened, only the barrel complete be replaced, problem is it is not anymore and even if found it would be way too expensive compare to the cost of a new mov.t . Nothing to gain from doing that, as many have found themselves. The commercial replacement mainspring that one can buy is expensive, not identical to the original, and gives iffy performances.

 

2 minutes ago, UhrTobi said:

Yes, this video I took as guidance. 🙂

Unfortunately removing an hairspring and refitting by hand always introduce undesirable deformation, reason for which professional use mainspring winders.

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I must be blind... Eaven now, I found Marks video of the 7S36 (https://youtu.be/tDa1ZZFwoBU)🙃

And at the verry beginning there he do a timegrapher measurment wich shows as nearly the same behaviour as my movement exept of the amplitude - mine is just a bit lower. So could it be, that I just did not cleaned enough? Also I did no demagnetising because my demagnetiser is just on the way to me... Maybe I should restart all over and do a better job by cleaning this watch?! 

 

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13 hours ago, UhrTobi said:

Without click spring I can move the escape wheel backwards with out any problems by winding the mainspring backwards without lagging. I hope I did this in the right way.

No it's not the right way. The mainspring must never, ever, be wound backwards. I had explained before that "backspin" is a small "natural" reversing of the escape wheel immediately before it stops, and that as noted, not all watches do that, in fact Seiko of this type do not.

 

54 minutes ago, UhrTobi said:

So could it be, that I just did not cleaned enough? Also I did no demagnetising 

I don't think so it's neither of that, and also that since this is your very first, lubrication is imperfect too. Anyway, when Looking Mark's videos that is a Master watchmaker at work, they are able to work magic sometime. Before I tried to convey the fact that a low amplitude Seiko is something very difficult to resolve for a beginner, of course I'd be happy if you could.

 

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55 minutes ago, UhrTobi said:

Maybe I should restart all over and do a better job by cleaning this watch?! 

 Dirt like any other fault can cause amplitude fluctuation, so if a clean fixes the problem ! you have washed away the fault without finding it. Thats not going to be very educational.

I believe its a faulty tooth or pinion leaves. perhaps even a wobbling wheel, most common is a wobbling escape wheel.

Amplitude fluctuations if periodic has to do with a gear in the train or in the escapement.

Intermittent fluctuations, however not neccessarily periodic are generally a hairspring issue, in which case a simple demag or a one dip hairspring clean would fix the problem, this doesn't seem to be the case here.

We know the issue with the watch on your bench is not one of loose object/screw/ spec of dirt .... inside the movement.

So far we know there is a patient who occasionally feels pain,  but where does it hurt. 

Regards 

 

 

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No it's not the right way. The mainspring must never, ever, be wound backwards. I had explained before that "backspin" is a small "natural" reversing of the escape wheel immediately before it stops, and that as noted, not all watches do that, in fact Seiko of this type do not.

Oh, thas is because of my worse english... Im so sorry. I hope I did not any damage... 

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Anyway, when Looking Mark's videos that is a Master watchmaker at work, they are able to work magic sometime.

Oh yes, I think so, too - a verry verry long way to go 🙂

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...of course I'd be happy if you could.

I will go on and try my verry best. 

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...so if a clean fixes the problem ! you have washed away the fault without finding it. Thats not going to be very educational.

Thats true again 🙂

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I believe its a faulty tooth or pinion leaves. perhaps even a wobbling wheel, most common is a wobbling escape wheel.

Ok, thank you, so this will be my next step - examine all wheels. 

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We know the issue with the watch on your bench is not one of loose object/screw/ spec of dirt .... inside the movement.

Yes, I'm sure there is no large stuff within. I would have seen it at least at my microskope.

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So far we know there is a patient who occasionally feels pain,  but where does it hurt.

Yes, that is true - he cries a little bit but I will tell him to be patient. We will find the problem 😉

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1 hour ago, UhrTobi said:

I must be blind... Eaven now, I found Marks video of the 7S36 (https://youtu.be/tDa1ZZFwoBU)🙃

And at the verry beginning there he do a timegrapher measurment wich shows as nearly the same behaviour as my movement exept of the amplitude - mine is just a bit lower. So could it be, that I just did not cleaned enough? Also I did no demagnetising because my demagnetiser is just on the way to me... Maybe I should restart all over and do a better job by cleaning this watch?!

 

9 hours ago, TimpanogosSlim said:

In at least one of Mark's videos, he demonstrates oiling a mainspring in that way. And then disposes of his fouled finger cots. 

This was after cleaning the mainspring and barrel, so *some lubrication should probably be applied. I haven't read through the long thread in this forum about different methods. 

This is in fact an automatic, so braking grease is preferred on the walls of the barrel. But i think without it, the problem will be low reserve time due to slipping, but not a lack of power. 

I've quoted two things above what do they have in common?

In the video Mark talks about watch doesn't run well and he shows a watch that's not running well. He comments about the lubrication's basically gone bad he doesn't mention what happens if you use bad lubrication in the first place?

Then much further in in the video he shows putting the mainspring back in uses breaking grease and? I don't see him wiping grease on this mainspring?

Well what's the worst that could happen if you do not lubricate the mainspring correctly? The problem is I don't know if the grease is a suitable grease or not? For those good at reading tech sheets may be you can tell me that we have a tech sheet for each of the lubricants but because a different manufacturers they don't really translate at all. But we also have Mark not putting grease on this mainspring?

If we have sticky mainspring grease is that going to be an issue at all? If the coils do not slip properly or evenly or well could they simulate a dirty bad lubrication like in the start of the video? Would uneven power to cause any issues? What about the breaking grease that Mark uses did he really needed or not? The purpose of breaking greases is let the mainspring slipped when it nears the end and the breaking part holds the spring once slips a little bit. But without breaking grease how far will it slip with the lack of power because the mainsprings slips too much be an issue?

Then further in the video he demagnetized is the watch I wonder if that's necessary?

Then on the timing machine it definitely looks better. But he has a concern about one of the pivots Then he takes It apart and cleans it again and it's much better.

TF1410EN b52.pdf tinf_8200_en_0-1.pdf

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5 hours ago, JohnR725 said:

Well what's the worst that could happen if you do not lubricate the mainspring correctly? The problem is I don't know if the grease is a suitable grease or not? For those good at reading tech sheets may be you can tell me that we have a tech sheet for each of the lubricants but because a different manufacturers they don't really translate at all. But we also have Mark not putting grease on this mainspring?

 

I am far from qualified or expert. And there's a whole thread here about mainspring lubrication that would be a better place to read and discuss on the issue. 

I am not well versed in when a modern white alloy mainspring in a hand-wound watch should or shouldn't be lubricated. 

What i am proposing is more that for the forces inside the barrel, "sticky" is probably not a concern for any brand new grease. We also know that aside from problems with the oil spreading, barrels that are dripping with thin oil seem to deliver power reliably in hand-wound movements. 

Having no lubrication at all on the inside walls of the barrel in an automatic could eventually damage the winding mechanism. 

I suspect that having a non-braking grease on the inside walls of an automatically wound barrel would mostly manifest as poor power reserve because it will slip earlier. If we search around here and out on the internet in other fora, anecdotally that seems to be the case. 

My main thesis, fwiw, is that the mainspring is not where i would focus my attention if this movement was on my bench. 

I keep saying, because it's true, that having high magnification has caused me a great deal of frustration with regard to my cleaning processes. Because it turns out that what i thought may be adequate cleaning is frequently discovered to have been inadequate. 

If it were on my bench, i would be closely inspecting every pivot and every jewel. 

But I'm only marginally more experienced than the OP.

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7 minutes ago, TimpanogosSlim said:

We also know that aside from problems with the oil spreading, barrels that are dripping with thin oil seem to deliver power reliably in hand-wound movements. 

Of course they are, as the mainspring is held on both ends, its force easily wins excessive or wrong lubrication. 

 

7 minutes ago, TimpanogosSlim said:

Having no lubrication at all on the inside walls of the barrel in an automatic could eventually damage the winding mechanism.

That is your statement, but is not supported by evidence.  Consider, in almost nine years of existence of this forum members reported all kinds if problems with mainsprings and barrels, but nobody showed wear on the bridle or outer wall if an automatic. The reason why braking grease is often recommended on these is not to protect parts, but to increase friction to avoid early slipping of the mainspring, as you noted also. 

 

7 minutes ago, TimpanogosSlim said:

My main thesis, fwiw, is that the mainspring is not where i would focus my attention if this movement was on my bench.

I agree with that, with the only addition that messing with the hairspring of a Seiko can only have added imperfection to the elusive equation that produce high amplitude on them.

 

7 minutes ago, TimpanogosSlim said:

If it were on my bench, i would be closely inspecting every pivot and every jewel. 

We have a member here (apparently now inactive) that claimed he reached good amplitude on entry level Seikos by scrupolouos cleaning, etc. Maybe that was for one or few pieces, that I don't know but I would be happy to see that demonstrated, as it's not my experience. With that I'm not saying that a Seiko can tolerate dirtiness, but simply that predicating to dedicated beginner that his watch will run better with repeated cleaning, is setting the wrong expectation in my opinion. 

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On 1/11/2022 at 3:52 PM, UhrTobi said:

. the amplitude is now sometimes over 200° but suddenly it goes back to 180°. 

Hiw long would you say it stays at 180?  and how long is duration of 200 amplitude? 

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52 minutes ago, jdm said:

Of course they are, as the mainspring is held on both ends, its force easily wins excessive or wrong lubrication. 

 

That is your statement, but is not supported by evidence.  Consider, in almost nine years of existence of this forum members reported all kinds if problems with mainsprings and barrels, but nobody showed wear on the bridle or outer wall if an automatic. The reason why braking grease is often recommended on these is not to protect parts, but to increase friction to avoid early slipping of the mainspring, as you noted also. 

 

I agree with that, with the only addition that messing with the hairspring of a Seiko can only have added imperfection to the elusive equation that produce high amplitude on them.

 

We have a member here (apparently now inactive) that claimed he reached good amplitude on entry level Seikos by scrupolouos cleaning, etc. Maybe that was for one or few pieces, that I don't know but I would be happy to see that demonstrated, as it's not my experience. With that I'm not saying that a Seiko can tolerate dirtiness, but simply that predicating to dedicated beginner that his watch will run better with repeated cleaning, is setting the wrong expectation in my opinion. 

 

I didn't say wear on the barrel or mainspring, I said on the winding mechanism. Excessive wear on ETA reversing wheels is frequently seen, but precise causes are not necessarily investigated because the only way to deal with it is to replace them. 

The pawls on seiko magic lever mechanisms gradually wear down, causing them to engage with fewer teeth on the winding wheels and reduced effectiveness of automatic winding. 

Anyway, what i suggested was close inspection. Merely throwing the parts through the same process they have been through once already probably won't change anything, and he certainly wouldn't learn much from it if it did. 

With close enough inspection he may detect residues that require special attention, or a subtly bent pivot, or some damaged teeth on a wheel, or a damaged jewel. 

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4 minutes ago, TimpanogosSlim said:

The pawls on seiko magic lever mechanisms gradually wear down

Since that you pointed that out in  the context of a Seiko topic. Within the OP's lubricants we didn't saw the graphite loaded grease which is applied there and few other places. Of course, not that it would make any difference with the problem at hand, but goes toward showing that doing things 100% right even on a simple and economical watch is not so immediate.

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    • Say that fast 5 times 😂
    • I have a few questions on the use of a (lever-type) jeweling tool in the adjustment of jewel endshakes, as I have never done this before. 1. If the endshake is too much or too little, how do you choose where to adjust the endshake? Do you adjust the endshake on the train bridge, or the main plate, or both? How do you decide which is the best? 2. When inserting the pusher into the spindle of a lever-type jeweling tool, such as a Favourite, is the best practice to take out the entire spindle from the tool frame to insert the pusher? And likewise, take out the entire spindle from the tool frame to remove the pusher? Or is it perfectly ok to insert or remove the pusher when the spindle is still inside the jeweling tool frame. Which way is safer/ best practice. 3. Is there an attachment to the base of the jeweling tool to hold the mainplate or bridges? I don’t seem to see any for sale, new or otherwise. Can I make one?
    • In the USA, you could try: https://www.jewelerssupplies.com/ or http://www.julesborel.com/ Cousins in the UK might be a possibility (although Waltham is a US watch, I'm sure some of them made it across the pond). https://www.cousinsuk.com/ Mark also has a list here: https://www.watchfix.com/category/watch-parts-tools-suppliers/watch-parts-tools-suppliers-us/
    • Yup. It's like the song from The Greatest Showman.... Never Enough! Never, never...
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